ABOUT 'BEAT YOUR A-FIB'...


"This book is incredibly complete and easy-to-understand for anybody. I certainly recommend it for patients who want to know more about atrial fibrillation than what they will learn from doctors...."

Pierre Jaïs, M.D. Professor of Cardiology, Haut-Lévêque Hospital, Bordeaux, France

"Dear Steve, I saw a patient this morning with your book [in hand] and highlights throughout. She loves it and finds it very useful to help her in dealing with atrial fibrillation."

Dr. Wilber Su Cavanaugh Heart Center, Phoenix, AZ

"Your book [Beat Your A-Fib] is the quintessential most important guide not only for the individual experiencing atrial fibrillation and his family, but also for primary physicians, and cardiologists."

Jane-Alexandra Krehbiel, nurse, blogger and author "Rational Preparedness: A Primer to Preparedness"



ABOUT A-FIB.COM...


"Steve Ryan's summaries of the Boston A-Fib Symposium are terrific. Steve has the ability to synthesize and communicate accurately in clear and simple terms the essence of complex subjects. This is an exceptional skill and a great service to patients with atrial fibrillation."

Dr. Jeremy Ruskin of Mass. General Hospital and Harvard Medical School

"I love your [A-fib.com] website, Patti and Steve! An excellent resource for anybody seeking credible science on atrial fibrillation plus compelling real-life stories from others living with A-Fib. Congratulations…"

Carolyn Thomas, blogger and heart attack survivor; MyHeartSisters.org

"Steve, your website was so helpful. Thank you! After two ablations I am now A-fib free. You are a great help to a lot of people, keep up the good work."

Terry Traver, former A-Fib patient

"If you want to do some research on AF go to A-Fib.com by Steve Ryan, this site was a big help to me, and helped me be free of AF."

Roy Salmon Patient, A-Fib Free; pacemakerclub.com, Sept. 2013


Volunteers

My A-Fib Story: The Healing Power of Prayer

Jon Murray - My A-Fib Story at A-Fib.com

Jon Murray

By Jon, August 2016

I have been cured of A-Fib since 2011 and simply wanted to share my testimony with you and your readers at A-Fib.com.

A-Fib Medications Didn’t Work

I struggled with A-Fib for almost eight months in the year of 2011. It began in January, and I had episodes of it throughout the year. My episodes weren’t too bad—as in I never had any side effects of the A-Fib like fainting or clotting. The only real thing I had during the episodes was an irregular heartbeat and a fast heart rate.

Being as young as I am and having a family of my own, it was a lot to have on my shoulders.

I wanted the A-Fib gone, and the medication I was taking did not make it go away.

My Pastors Prayed for My Healing

I knew of another way that the A-Fib could go away—by God supernaturally healing me.  Well, in August of 2011 I asked the pastors of my church to pray for me that God would heal me.  After the Sunday service they prayed for me. And a week after that my A-Fib was gone. I was healed by prayer.

I haven’t had an episode or problem since 2011!  It’s a miracle!

Helped by Great Physicians Too

I am not writing this to refute your book, Steve, nor am I saying that the medical field should not be called upon for help in the time of need.

If it wasn’t for the great physicians here where I live on the East Coast, I would be in bad shape—who knows what would have happened if they didn’t break those episodes I had. And, I’ve read testimonies of others where medicine helped them with, if not cured, their A-Fib episodes.

I simply wanted to share with you my experience – since it included A-Fib.  Who knows—maybe God can bless you through my e-mail.

Jon
ayatingl@gmail.com

Editor’s Comments
A-Fib.com's Positive Thought/Prayer group

A-Fib.com’s Positive Thought/Prayer group

At A-Fib.com one of our volunteer groups is a Positive Thought/Prayer group comprised of wonderful people worldwide. If you would like their support, especially at the time of your ablation or surgery, please email us your request. It’s comforting to know that others who’ve had A-Fib care about you and wish you well.

How to Send Your Request: Send your request to our coordinator, Barbara. Write to barbara: babareeba(at)aol.com (substitute an “@” for the “(at)”).

Join our Group: We invite you to join our ‘A-Fib Positive Thought/Prayer’ group. Learn more on our page: The Healing Power of Hope, Belief and Expectations. All are welcome.

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Related Reading:
Anatomy of Hope book cover 350 pix wide at 96 resThe Anatomy of Hope: How People Prevail in the Face of Illness

by Jerome E. Groopman

There’s more to hope than we thought. Hope triggers biochemical changes.

Written by an oncologist and citing actual patient cases (mostly cancer), Dr. Groopman explores the role of hope in fighting disease and healing. Top scientists are interviewed who study the biological link between emotion and biological responses; the most relevant studies are reviewed.

The author shows how hope, belief and expectations can alter the course of our lives, and even of our physical body. HOPE works! (Read Patti’s review on Amazon.com.)

If you find any errors on this page, email us. Last updated: Thursday, August 18, 2016

Marilyn Shook Updates Her 2008 Personal A-Fib Story

Support Volunteer Marilyn Shook

Support Volunteer Marilyn Shook

We published Marilyn Shook’s A-Fib personal story in 2008 (story #25). She emailed me an update in August 2014. In July 2015, I added the following to her A-Fib personal story:

Marilyn was A-Fib free for 7 years after her pulmonary vein ablation in late 2007. In the last few years, she occasionally felt a weird irregular heartbeat that never showed up in the doctor’s office or with short duration monitors.
In August 2014, she had a Medtronic Reveal LINQ ICM (Insertable Cardiac Monitor) installed to identify these arrhythmias. The Reveal monitor did document 2 or 3 episodes of A-Fib. She opted to have a repeat PVA.
In July 2015 she emailed me an update. “It’s been 9 months since my repeat PVA, and there is no evidence of A-Fib. I have not felt that arrhythmia, and my implanted cardiac monitor has been negative for A-Fib.
I no longer take Xarelto or any cardiac medications. I do take a daily 325 mg Aspirin. I am optimistic that the repeat PVA will be effective, and I will continue to be A-Fib free.”

We are most grateful to Marilyn for sharing with us how effective the Reveal monitor was in identifying very intermittent irregular heartbeats that probably never would have been documented otherwise.

Not everyone would have been as aggressive as Marilyn. But she knew how relatively safe a second PVI would be, and she had confidence in her EP, Dr. David Haines, at William Beaumont Hospital in Royal Oak, Michigan.

Her personal A-Fib story is #25.

Our A-Fib Support Volunteers: Just an Email Away

Marilyn Shook is one of our many A-Fib Support Volunteers. You can find her contact information on our A-Fib Support Volunteers page. We are blessed to have many generous people who have volunteered to help others get through their A-Fib ordeal. Check our Support Volunteers page to learn more about how to contact any of our 50 volunteers.

Our Worldwide A-Fib Support Volunteers

A few of our many A-Fib.com Support Volunteers; Learn about becoming a A-Fib Support Volunteer

Learn about becoming a A-Fib Support Volunteer

When diagnosed with Atrial Fibrillation, you have many questions. It helps to have someone who has “been there” and is there for you now. Our A-Fib Support Volunteers want to help and are just an email message away.

This list of worldwide A-Fib Support Volunteers is arranged by geographical region. Note: substitute an “@” symbol for the “(at)”.

Read the special poem A-Fib’s Demise
by support volunteer, Emmett Finch, The Malibu Poet

WORLDWIDE

A-Fib Support Volunteers

WESTERN EUROPE

Ira, Rome, Italy; (Fluent in English & Italian) E-mail: idl.sorbo(at)mclinknet.it  (Experience in overcoming heart problems—heart attacks, pericarditis, cardiac asthma, bradycardia, tachycardia, PVCs & PACs, A-Fib [cured 2004], and pacemakers. He wears an ICD.) (see his personal experience story, #31: Living With a Pacemaker/ICD).

AUSTRALIA

Allan, Brisbane, Australia; Email: a-fibfriendallan(at)live.com.au

Ian, Sydney, Australia; E-mail: vagalman(at)optusnet.com.au

Roy, Adelaide, Australia; E-mail: roys1(at)tpg.com.au

Warren, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; E-mail: redolent(at)bigpond.com (see his personal experience story, #34: A-Fib Free After Two Ablations Down Under)

EASTERN CANADA

Mark G., Barrie, Ontario; E-mail: stoneabba007(at)gmail.com

WESTERN CANADA

Darrell, Alberta, Canada; E-mail: bronc9239(at)hotmail.com

UNITED KINGDOM (ENGLAND)

David W., Norwich, Norfolk, England; E-mail: david(at)dandrhomesltd.co.uk

SOUTHERN AFRICA

Leon, South Africa, Johannesburg, Cape Town; E-mail: leon(at)mbanet.co.za

SOUTHEAST ASIA

Lee, Malaysia; E-mail: amirlee2(at)yahoo.com

Max, Shanghai, China; E-mail: max.jussila(at)gmail.com (see his personal experience story, #34: “From Shanghai to Bordeaux—a very difficult case requiring two ablations”)

For more information about our A-Fib Support Volunteers and how to volunteer, see my article: ‘Want to become a A-Fib Support Volunteer?’

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Return to Resources and Links
Return to A-Fib Support Volunteers

If you find any errors on this page, email us.  Last updated: Tuesday, October 6, 2015

DISCLAIMER: A-Fib.com Support Volunteers are not medical doctors and are not affiliated with any medical school or organization. Any communication with A-Fib.com Support Volunteers is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health professional prior to starting any new treatment or with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Nothing communicated by A-Fib.com Support Volunteers is intended to be for medical diagnosis or treatment. Their opinions are their own.

 

Our U.S. A-Fib Support Volunteers

A few of our many A-Fib.com Support Volunteers; Learn about becoming a A-Fib Support Volunteer.

Learn about becoming a A-Fib Support Volunteer.

When diagnosed with Atrial Fibrillation, you have many questions. It helps to have someone who has “been there” and is there for you now. Our A-Fib Support Volunteers want to help and are just an email message away.

This list of U.S. A-Fib Support Volunteers is arranged by geographical region. Note: substitute an “@” symbol for the “(at)”.

Read the special poem A-Fib’s Demise
by support volunteer, Emmett Finch, The Malibu Poet

UNITED STATES

A-Fib Support Volunteers

New England, USA
Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, Vermont

David H., Lexington, Massachusetts, Email: dholzman1776(at)gmail.com

Fred, Boston, Massachusetts; E-mail: fredfan1(at)aol.com

Mark S., New Hampshire; E-mail: seagullsnest(at)comcast.net

Rich, Boston, Massachusetts; E-mail: celtic8586(at)aol.com

Northeast, USA
Delaware, Indiana, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, West Virginia

Jerry, Long Island, New York; E-mail: Jerrynmn1(at)aol.com

Joe B., Greater New York City area; (E-mail: NG; needs updating as of 6-29-2014)

Ken, Loveland, OH; E-mail: closeks(at)fuse.net (expertise: Dr. Sirak’s Five Box Mini-Maze operation)

Scott, Montrose, NY (North of New York City): E:mail: Matrix058(at)yahoo.com. (expertise: Dealing with the ablation process)

Southeast, USA
Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Maryland, North Carolina,
South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia

Ed W., Fort Lauderdale, Florida; E-mail: edwebbfl(at)gmail.com (Athlete, Heart Rate Monitor expertise) (see his personal experience story, #15: Cyclist/Triathlete with Persistent A-Fib)

Alan A., Richmond, Virginia; E-mail: adanet56(at)gmail.com

Alvin, Delray Beach, Florida; E-mail: adrelich(at)bellsouth.net (Medicines keep Alvin A-Fib free)

Bob, Palm Coast, Florida (Veteran); E-mail: bobwhitehurst(at)gmail.com

Jay, Atlanta, Georgia; E-mail: jjteresi(at)yahoo.com (see his personal experience story, #55: In A-Fib at age 25!—A guy deals with the anxiety. A-Fib free after two ablations at Texas Cardiac Arrhythmia Institute)

Michael, Raleigh, North Carolina; E-mail: halfmooncorp(at)hotmail.com

Sheri, Winchester, Virginia; E-mail: sheriweber47(at)yahoo.com. (Cox-Maze IV experience) Read Sheri’s story in our book Beat Your A-Fib: The Essential Guide to Finding Your Cure, A Life on Meds Wasn’t Good Enough—Selects a Minimally Invasive Cox-Maze IV, p. 105.

Stuart, Virginia; E-mail: ssutphin(at)vt.edu

Northwest, USA
Alaska, Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Washington, Wyoming

Dick, Walla Walla, Washington. (E-mail: NG; needs updating as of 6-29-2014) (had both a Mini-Maze, then Catheter Ablation) (see his personal experience story, #62)

Karl, Salem, Oregon. Telephone: (503) 949-1162—Karl prefers to talk over the phone after 4:00 pm PST. E-mail: karlgranat(at)msn.com. (Two ablations by Dr. Natale in San Francisco).

Todd F., Spokane, Washington. Email: cco2coug(at)gmail.com. (Three failed ablations in the Pacific Northwest, then successful ablation by Dr. Natale in San Francisco.)

Southwest, USA
Arizona, California, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah

Beverly, Los Angeles, CA; E-mail: beverlywelsh(at)msn.com (expertise: Living with A-Fib, Drug Therapies)

Ed N., Monterey Peninsula, CA; E-mail: trigeeked(at)gmail.com

Joyce, Los Angeles, CA; E-mail: JET7700(at)aol.com (Joyce coordinates our Southern CA A-Fib Support Group)

Kathy, Oceanside, CA. E-mail: Katbuda(at)aol.com

Michele, Salt Lake City, Utah; Email: mstraube(at)mindspring.com (see her personal experience story, #42: Cured After 30 Years in A-Fib by Dr. Marrouche)

Monique, Irvine, CA; E-mail: mvancansun(at)yahoo.com (expertise: Women who exercise )

Bob Muenckler, Santa Monica, CA; By phone only 310-613-5413 (Expect an enthusiastic but long conversation. If you leave Bob your phone number, he will call you back on his own dime.) (expertise: Dr. Sirak’s Five-Box Thoracoscopic operation).

Mike Jones, Redding (Sacramento Valley), CA; E-mail: mjonesrdg(at)gmail.com (expertise: A-Fib drugs, amiodarone, Finding the Right Doctor) (see his personal experience story, #64: Triathlete 18 years in A-Fib, on Amiodarone for eight years—then A-Fib free after ablation by Dr. Padriag O’Neill)

Emmett Finch (The Malibu Poet; read his poem “A-Fib’s-Demise“): Malibu, CA; Phone: 310-457-7895. E-mail: sunbro(at)mindspring.com. Expertise: Watchman Device, AV Node Ablation and Pacemaker. (Read Emmett’s story “40-Year Battle With A-Fib Includes AV Node Ablation With Pacemaker” on page 161 of Beat Your A-Fib. Emmett celebrated his 94th birthday in 2015.)

Hawaii, USA

Joe L., Honolulu, Hawaii; E-mail: jleonardo98(at)yahoo.com

North Central, USA
Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, 
North Dakota, South Dakota, Wisconsin

Chris, Jackson, MI (South Central Michigan); Email: daddyzegar(at)gmail.com  (Expertise: young people with A-Fib);(see his personal experience story, #56: A-Fib Started at Age 23!—Ablation by Dr. Eric Good at Un. of Michigan)

Greg, Carbondale, Illinois; E-mail: ga2607(at)cba.siu.edu.  (see his personal experience story, #32: Not Necessary To Go To Top-Name A-Fib Centers To Have Excellent Care and Good Results)

Howard, Highland Park, Illinois; E-mail: howard.felix(at)comcast.net

Linda, Grand Junction, Michigan; E-mail: linda-seaman(at)btc-bci.com

Marilyn, Commerce Township, MI (near Detroit);  E-mail: nmshook(at)sbcglobal.net. (expertise: Pill-In-The-Pocket); (see her personal experience story, #25: Two Different “Pill-In-The-Pocket” Approaches—Both Turn to Catheter Ablation for a Cure)

Steven (17-year-old) & Steven’s Mother Sue (Teenager with A-Fib & Parent ready to help others), Michigan.  Email: suegaston(at)gmail.com.

Kathy R. Hollister, Missouri. (Expertise: Natural Remedies for A-Fib) Email: katheemarie77(at)yahoo.com. See Kathy’s personal experience story #73: A-Fib Success with Naturopathic Assistance—Over 10 Months A-Fib Free

 South Central, USA
Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Oklahoma, Texas

Steve P, Dallas, TX: Email: sjpully(at)yahoo.com (Expertise: A-Fib & Flutter Ablations, Finding the Best EPs, 20+ Years in A-Fib). Phone: 214-587-6133.

Mike M. Friendswood, TX. E-mail: mmmontz(at)aol.com. (Expertise: Living with A-Fib after Heart Surgeries and Years of Chronic A-Fib)

For more information about our A-Fib Support Volunteers and how to volunteer, see my article: Want to become a A-Fib Support Volunteer?’

Back to the Top
Return to Resources and Links
Return to A-Fib Support Volunteers

If you find any errors on this page, email us.  Last updated: Wednesday, June 15, 2016

DISCLAIMER: A-Fib.com Support Volunteers are not medical doctors and are not affiliated with any medical school or organization. Any communication with A-Fib.com Support Volunteers is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health professional prior to starting any new treatment or with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Nothing communicated by A-Fib.com Support Volunteers is intended to be for medical diagnosis or treatment. Their opinions are their own.

Steve’s Inbox: International Mail & A-Fib Awareness Month

Many people email me for advice and support. This past week was quite the international experience for me. In addition to emails from the US, I also received emails from Syria, South Africa and Ecuador! Let me share a few with you.

The A-Fib Patient in a War Zone: Someone in a war-torn country was trying to find medical help for his A-Fib. A doctor started him on a heavy dose of amiodarone for his A-Fib. I told him about the toxic effects of amiodarone, but recognized that he was lucky to find any kind of medical help in a war zone. I couldn’t find any EPs still practicing in his country, but did find two centers in an adjacent country not at war. But I don’t know if he will be able to travel there. Please think positive thoughts/pray for him.

Airport Rendezvous: A traveler described a chance meeting in an airport with a well-known EP. This was more like a ‘sign’ than a chance occurrence. This wonderful EP answered her A-Fib questions and referred her to another EP near her for an ablation. She wrote that talking with the ‘airport’ EP helped her make the big decision to have a catheter ablation. (She had been looking at another surgery treatment option which I suggested might be overkill for her.)

Our A-Fib Support Volunteers were so supportive and helpful that she decided to become a volunteer, too.

A-Fib Support Volunteers in Action: Another woman described an all too common frustration with her primary care doctors and cardiologists who didn’t take her A-Fib symptoms seriously. They wouldn’t even refer her for a cardioversion. She was helped a lot by getting in touch with five of our great A-Fib Support Volunteers who had widely different experiences. They were so supportive and helpful that she decided to become an A-Fib Support Volunteer herself.

Amiodarone Advice: Another patient wrote that his cardiologist put him on a heavy dose of amiodarone when he first started having A-Fib episodes. I recommended the patient get a second opinion, that amiodarone is a very toxic med usually only prescribed as a last resort or for short periods of time like during the blanking period after a catheter ablation.

Negative Feedback: I warned someone about an EP whom I had heard negative things about. I referred the patient to a ‘master’ EP in his area for his ablation. I also told him to give his long-suffering wife a hug from all of us. All too often spouses of A-Fib patients put up with a lot and often feel alone and overwhelmed. I told them about the wonderful story “The Spouse’s Perspective: A Young Wife and Mother Copes with Husband’s A-Fib” in our book “Beat Your A-Fib: The Essential Guide to Finding Your Cure.”Top 10 Questions Families Ask About A-Fib - 150 pix at 96 res

September is A-Fib Awareness Month: As you see, there are many, many A-Fib patients out there seeking help and answers for their particular situation. A-Fib is not a one-size-all kind of disease. But A-Fib can be Cured! You don’t have to live a life on meds! Won’t you pass on our message to others with A-Fib and their families and friends? Send them a link to our special FREE report: The Top 10 Questions Families Ask About Atrial Fibrillation.

—Your A-Fib friend, Steve

“You’re Exaggerating Your A-Fib Symptoms” Her Doctor Said

By Steve S. Ryan, PhD

I received an email from a woman from England who described her horrendous A-Fib symptoms—palpitations, extreme fluttering, breathlessness, “absolute extreme fatigue.”

She then relayed how her doctor told her that her symptoms had nothing to do with her A-Fib, that these symptoms were all in her head, that she was exaggerating her breathlessness and exhaustion.

To add insult to injury, her doctor was a woman! (It’s usually male doctors who tell female patients that’s its all in their mind.)

I wrote back to her and reassured that her symptoms are real and recommended contacting one or more of our A-Fib Support Volunteers. They offer hope and encouragement through exchanging emails and sharing their stories. (Not all Support Volunteers are ‘cured’ of their A-Fib, but have found the best outcome for themselves.)

I also suggested she change doctors.

To learn more about our A-Fib Support Volunteers, go to our Resources page: Our A-Fib Support Volunteers: Just an Email Away.

Participate at A-Fib.com

Photo collage of patients who have shared their story on A-Fib.com

A few of the many readers who participate on A-Fib.com

There are many ways you can participate at A-Fib.com. You can join our support volunteers who offer others hope and encouragement. You can share your A-Fib story to inspire others. Or, write an article about a topic you’re passionate about. (We welcome other ideas too.)

Which is right for you? which will you choose?

Share Your A-Fib Personal Experience

Our Personal Experiences stories are one of the most visited areas of A-Fib.com. Patients often seek hope and encouragement. They look to others with similar symptoms, or who are in the same age group, or have experience with the treatments options they are considering. Visit our Personal Experiences page. Then, read how to write and submit your personal experience A-Fib story.

Join our Support Volunteers

When you have A-Fib, it helps to talk with someone who has (or had) A-Fib. That’s the role of our Support Volunteers. On a one-to-one basis, these individuals offer support and hope by exchanging emails, listening and sharing their stories. Would you like to help others struggling with A-Fib?

See our list of support volunteers. We are blessed to have many generous people who have volunteered to help others get through their A-Fib ordeal. They are not paid. They come from widely different backgrounds and live around the world. They have received help along the way and want to return the favor. (Note: not all Support Volunteers are ‘cured’ of their A-Fib, but have found the best outcome for themselves.) Read more about becoming an A-Fib Support Volunteer.

Our Prayer/Positive Thoughts Group

At A-Fib.com, we believe in healing through prayer, and in the power of positive thoughts. For those who have a treatment decision to make, have an upcoming procedure or surgery, or are seeking guidance from a higher power— support from this group is just an email away. You can join this effort by contacting our coordinator, Barbara, at email: babareeba(at)aol.com. Read more about our group…

Seeking Guest Writers

Like to read and write about what you’ve learned? Read an interesting research study and want to share with our readers? Or have a passion for a specific A-Fib-related topic or issue you’d like to report about? (As an example, see a report written by Lynn Haye.) Got questions? Topic ideas? Email Steve using our Contact Us form.

Have you thought of another way to Participate?

We welcome your thoughts and ideas. Use our Contact Us form if you have other suggestions.

Amazon.com review of Beat Your A-Fib book at A-Fib.com

If you find any errors on this page, email us. Y Last updated: Sunday, February 21, 2016
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Seven Ways to Reduce A-Fib Fear and Anxiety

7 Ways to Cope with the Fear and Anxiety of Atrial FibrillationCoping With the Fear and Anxiety of Atrial Fibrillation

by Steve S. Ryan, PhD

For a substantial portion of A-Fib patients, the impact on ‘quality of life’ extends beyond our beating heart. Atrial Fibrillation wreaks havoc with your head as well as your heart. Anxiety, fear, worry, confusion, frustration and depression. And at times, anger.

The psychological and emotional effects of Atrial Fibrillation can be debilitating. Recent research indicates that “psychological distress” worsens A-Fib symptoms’ severity.1

(Don’t expect much help from your heart doctors. They aren’t trained or often have little effective experience in dealing with the psychological and emotional aspects of A-Fib.)

Don’t be ashamed to admit how A-Fib makes you feel (especially if you’re a guy). Your psyche is just as important as your physical heart. Just acknowledging you have some or all of these symptoms is a step in the right direction.

Seven WAYS TO COPE WITH YOUR A-FIB FEAR AND ANXIETY

1. Knowledge is Power and Control!

Read about your treatment options, learn about your A-Fib. Read how others have dealt with their A-Fib. Search the list of Personal Experiences published on his site. With over 80 stories, you’re sure to find a few patients with similar symptoms as yourself. Knowing others have beaten their A-Fib is a tremendous psychological relief. This helps replace fear with hope!

2. Anxiety Thought Log

Confront your A-Fib fears directly. Don’t let them mill around in your subconscious. Former A-Fib patient, Anthony Bladon, suggests you keep an ‘anxiety thoughts log.’ Write down word-for-word what the anxious thought was, when, and what was the trigger. Confront each fearful thought and try to re-state it in a more reasonable frame of mind, thereby reducing the anxiety. (See Anthony Bladon and his anxiety log.)

This may sound a bit bizarre, but try repeating anxious thoughts to yourself. Express a fear to yourself over and over. Let the monotony make your mind wander to more enjoyable thoughts. Or set aside a 20 minute worrying time during the day and refuse to think about troubling fears at any other time.

3. Yoga, Relaxation Techniques, Meditation and Walking 

In preliminary studies, Yoga has been demonstrated to improve A-Fib symptoms and to reduce A-Fib attacks, as well as improve quality of life, depression and anxiety.2 (See also FAQ #8 I do Yoga. It relaxes me and helps with my stress level. Is there any evidence on Yoga helping with other A-Fib symptoms?)

Relaxation techniques and meditation may also offer you relief from your anxieties.

A specific type of meditation called ‘Mindfulness’ is recommended by Harvard Pilgrim nurse case manager Linda Bixby. The technique is to ‘Observe and Feel the Physical Sensations’ of the A-Fib Episodes. At first this may seem counter-intuitive and may not work for you. The idea is to observe rather than resist or worry. You allow a frightening health event like an A-Fib attack to just run its course. For example, Neil Blanchette was diagnosed with A-Fib when he was 17. Meditation and “mindfulness” was a great help to him. “Just taking it in and letting myself feel the physical A-Fib experience was actually relaxing.”3(Thanks to David Holzman for calling our attention to this article.)

Walking curbs anxiety. Try to walk outdoors at approximately the same time each day. Breathing fresh air and having an established routine enhance the calming and relaxing effects of walking. But even if you can’t walk at the same time or outdoors, 20 minutes of walking daily reduces anxiety.

4. Natural Remedies:

Lavender Oil Aromatherapy: the light, soothing fragrance of lavender oil has long been used to ease anxiety (and insomnia). One example of many is Nature’s Way Calm Aid. “It contains Silexan, a type of lavender oil shown in clinical studies to ease anxiety as effectively as the benzodiazepine drug lorazepam (Ativan).”4

PharmaGABA: is a bioidentical form of GABA (gamma-ami­nobutyric acid), which serves as a critical calming agent in the central nervous system, works on the same chemical pathways as Xanax, Valium, and other drugs—without all the negative side effects; helps combat stress and anxiousness.5 One example is Natural Factors PharmaGABA

Relora: a blend of two botanical extracts (Magnolia officinalis and Phellodendron amurense) that helps reduce cortisol levels and promotes feelings of relaxation.6

Chamomile: “calms the nerves, reduces irritability and lessens the muscle spasms, headache and abdominal pain that can accompany anxiousness.” Substitute chamomile tea for caffeinated beverages, or take 60 drops of chamomile tincture in two ounces of water four times a day before or after meals, or add two drops of concentrated chamomile essential oil to a hot bath at night.7

Gotu Kola: restores health to brain and nerve cells by promoting blood circulation to the brain which has a calming effect.8

 

5. Counseling and Meds

Recognize that you may need professional help. Don’t be embarrassed to seek counseling. In addition, discuss if anxiety medication would be appropriate or helpful. (See Jay Teresi’s story, “Anxiety the Greatest Challenge” and Kelly Teresi’s story “A Young Wife Copes with Husband’s A-Fib” in my book, Beat Your A-Fib, pgs. 101-105)

6. Our A-Fib Support Volunteers

It might calm your fears to talk with or email someone who knows first-hand how A-Fib makes you feel. Each of our A-Fib Support Volunteers has gone through a lot to be cured of their A-Fib. They were helped along the way and now they want to return the favor by offering you support and hope. Learn more on our A-Fib Support Volunteers page (under Resources and Links).

7. Enlist Support From Your Loved Ones

Recognize that A-Fib can have significant consequences on your social interactions with your family and colleagues. Sit down and have a talk with your significant other, your friends and co-workers. Explain what A-Fib is, how it affects you and how it makes you feel. Ask for their understanding. They will want to help you, so be prepared to answer their questions.

Takeaway: Fight your fears! Ambush your anxiety! Atrial Fibrillation may be in your heart but it doesn’t have to be in your head. Seek your freedom from anxiety and improve the quality of your life.

Other ideas? If you have suggestions or programs that helped reduce your A-Fib-related anxiety, please email me and let me know.

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Last updated: Sunday, February 7, 2016

References    (↵ returns to text)
  1. Gehi AK at al. Psychopathology and symptoms of atrial fibrillation: implications for therapy. J Cardiovasc Electrophysiol. 2012 May;23(5):473-8. doi: 10.1111/j.1540-8167.2011.02264.x. Epub 2012 Mar 19. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22429764
  2. Neale, T. Yoga May Calm Afib. MedscapeToday.com. Jan 23, 2013. Last accessed Jan 23, 2014. URL:http://www.medpagetoday.com/Cardiology/Arrhythmias/37121
  3. Harvard Pilgrim Health Care. Your Health, Fall 2014.
  4. Lucile, H. (DrHollyLucille.com) Natural remedy for anxiety, Bottom Line Health, April, 2014, p. 16.
  5. Whitaker, J. PharmaGABA Chewables for Immediate Stress Relief. Whitaker Wellness Institute website. Last accessed March 29, 2014. URL: http://www.whitakerwellness.com/pharmagaba/
  6. Whitaker, J. Innovations in Wellness Medicine, Natural Solutions for Stress Relief. Dr. Whitaker’s Health & Healing, March 2015, Vol. 25, No. 3.
  7. Starbuck, Jamison. The Natural Way/No More Drugs for Anxiety. Bottom Line Health, Volume 29, Number 10, October 2015, p. 10.
  8. Ibid.

Healing Power of Positive Thoughts & Prayer

A-Fib.com - A-Fib Positive Thoughts & Prayer Group

Support is just an email away

Our A-Fib Positive Thoughts & Prayer Group

The Healing Power of Hope, Belief and Expectations

Do you have an important decision to make about your treatment? Or an upcoming procedure or surgery? Do you need prayer? Positive thoughts? Are you seeking guidance from a higher power? 

At A-Fib.com we believe—in healing through hope, belief, prayer—and in the power of positive thoughts. To support you in seeking your cure (or best outcome) we offer the assistance of our dedicated A-Fib Positive Thought/Prayer Group. This support group is just an email away. 

How to Send Your Request

Send your request to our coordinator, Barbara. Write to barbara: babareeba(at)aol.com (substitute an “@” for the “(at)”).

Additional Readings

You may enjoy reading the following articles and book: 

Can Positive Thoughts Help Heal Another Person? Barbara Bradley Hagerty. All Things Considered/NPR. May 21, 2009.

Book: order from Amazon.com

How the Power of Positive Thinking Won Scientific Credibility. The Atlantic Monthly. April 23, 2012.

Redefining Women’s Health: for Heart, Mind, Body, and Spirit. Lisa Rankin, M.D. Psychology Today. December 27, 2011.

You may also enjoy the book The Anatomy of Hope: How People Prevail in the Face of Illness by Jerome E. Groopman.  Written by an oncologist and citing actual patient cases (mostly cancer), Dr. Groopman explores the role of hope in fighting disease and healing. Top scientists are interviewed who study the biological link between emotion and biological responses; the most relevant studies are reviewed.

The author shows how hope, belief and expectations can alter the course of our lives, and even of our physical body. HOPE works! (Read my review on Amazon.com.)

Want to volunteer and support others? Volunteer for our dedicated A-Fib Positive Thought/Prayer Group! Contact Barbara at babareeba(at)aol.com.

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Last updated: Thursday, August 18, 2016

 

A-Fib Online Discussion Groups and Resources

One-to-one support and online support groups can be very helpful to patients and others interested in A-Fib. First, it’s helpful to know you are not alone.

Our A-Fib Support Volunteers are just an email away

One-to-One, our A-Fib Support Volunteers are just an email away

Many, many others are dealing with Atrial Fibrillation. Second, the discussion with fellow patients can often benefit those just reading the discussion, perhaps offering a new perspective. But, don’t stay on the sideline, participate! Join in. You’ll feel better talking with others who know what you are dealing with.

These services are free. Some may require registration before you can post messages or even read the messages.

Each service is unique. Membership numbers vary greatly. Some offer useful databases of information. And while some are focused on a specific type of A-Fib, they often cover many subjects relevant to anyone with A-Fib.

• A-Fib Support Volunteers: One-to-One Support; Atrial Fibrillation: Resources for Patients: http://a-fib.com/a-fib-support-volunteers/
• AFIB Support Forum: http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/AFIBsupport/
• A-fibcures Forum: http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/A-fibcures/
• Atrial Fibrillation Association UK Forum: https://healthunlocked.com/afassociation
• Daily Strength Atrial Fibrillation Support Group: http://www.dailystrength.org/c/Atrial-Fibrillation-AFib/support-group
• Facebook Group Atrial Fibrillation Support Forum: https://www.facebook.com/groups/AtrialFibrillationSupportForum/?fref=ts
• Facebook Group “What Is Atrial Fibrillation?”: https://www.facebook.com/groups/28241296298/
• Lone Atrial Fibrillation Forum: 
http://www.afibbers.org/toboards.htm
• StopAfib Discussion Forum: http://forum.stopafib.org

Do you have a favorite discussion group not listed here? Email us, so we can add it to our list.

Warning:  If you join any of these groups, you may not want to use your real name, address, etc. Insurance companies, employers, mortgage lenders, credit card companies, etc. may ‘Google’ you and find you belong to an Atrial Fibrillation site or have A-Fib. This may influence their decision-making about you.

If you find any errors on this page, email us. ♥ Last updated: Tuesday, October 6, 2015

A-Fib Support Volunteers: Just an Email Away

  Our A-Fib Support Volunteers: Just an Email Away

A few of our many A-Fib.com Support Volunteers

A few of our many A-Fib.com Support Volunteers

Your first experiences with A-Fib has changed your life in a number of ways. In addition to the emotional impact you may have had after being diagnosed, you now have important decisions to make about your treatment and about how you may need to adjust to life with your A-Fib symptoms and new medications.

It helps to have someone who has “been there” and is there for you now.

Our A-Fib Support Volunteers

Having someone you can turn to for advice, emotional support, and a sense of hope that you can be cured, may bring you peace of mind. (Click on title to jump to that list.)

List of U.S. Volunteers
List of Worldwide Volunteers

Our A-Fib Positive Thoughts/Prayer Group

At A-Fib.com we believe—in healing through hope, belief, prayer—and in the power of positive thoughts. Learn more at The Healing Power of Hope, Belief and Expectations

Got A-Fib - Revised Oct 6 2015 550 deep pix wide at 96 resBlessed by our World-Wide Volunteers

We are blessed to have many generous people who have volunteered to help others get through their A-Fib ordeal.

Most A-Fib Support Volunteers are not medical personnel. They can’t be expected to have every medical A-Fib fact at their fingertips. They are not paid. They come from widely different backgrounds. But you can be sure they care about you and understand what you are going through.

These volunteers have gone through a lot while seeking their A-Fib cure. They have been helped along the way and want to return the favor. They offer you support and hope through exchanging emails and sharing their stories. (Not all Support Volunteers are ‘cured’ of their A-Fib, but have found the best outcome for their situation.) Some have special skills which are listed in parentheses.

For more information about our A-Fib Support Volunteers and how to volunteer, see my article: ‘Want to become a A-Fib Support Volunteer?’

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Return to Resources and Links

If you find any errors on this page, email us. ♥ Last updated: Monday, August 8, 2016

DISCLAIMER: A-Fib.com Support Volunteers are not medical doctors and are not affiliated with any medical school or organization. Any communication with A-Fib.com Support Volunteers is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health professional prior to starting any new treatment or with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Nothing communicated by A-Fib.com Support Volunteers is intended to be for medical diagnosis or treatment. Their opinions are their own.

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