"This book is incredibly complete and easy-to-understand for anybody. I certainly recommend it for patients who want to know more about atrial fibrillation than what they will learn from doctors...."

Pierre Jaïs, M.D. Professor of Cardiology, Haut-Lévêque Hospital, Bordeaux, France

"Dear Steve, I saw a patient this morning with your book [in hand] and highlights throughout. She loves it and finds it very useful to help her in dealing with atrial fibrillation."

Dr. Wilber Su Cavanaugh Heart Center, Phoenix, AZ

"Your book [Beat Your A-Fib] is the quintessential most important guide not only for the individual experiencing atrial fibrillation and his family, but also for primary physicians, and cardiologists."

Jane-Alexandra Krehbiel, nurse, blogger and author "Rational Preparedness: A Primer to Preparedness"


"Steve Ryan's summaries of the Boston A-Fib Symposium are terrific. Steve has the ability to synthesize and communicate accurately in clear and simple terms the essence of complex subjects. This is an exceptional skill and a great service to patients with atrial fibrillation."

Dr. Jeremy Ruskin of Mass. General Hospital and Harvard Medical School

"I love your [A-fib.com] website, Patti and Steve! An excellent resource for anybody seeking credible science on atrial fibrillation plus compelling real-life stories from others living with A-Fib. Congratulations…"

Carolyn Thomas, blogger and heart attack survivor; MyHeartSisters.org

"Steve, your website was so helpful. Thank you! After two ablations I am now A-fib free. You are a great help to a lot of people, keep up the good work."

Terry Traver, former A-Fib patient

"If you want to do some research on AF go to A-Fib.com by Steve Ryan, this site was a big help to me, and helped me be free of AF."

Roy Salmon Patient, A-Fib Free; pacemakerclub.com, Sept. 2013


Will You Help Us? Our 5-Question Reader Survey

We value your feedback on how we are doing at A-Fib.com. Will you help us by answering just 5 simple questions? It’s easy and should only take 1–2 minutes.

Go to our Reader Survey. We’ll be collecting responses through October 26th. (We’ll share the results shortly after that date.)

We’ll use the information to help us set future goals while continuing what’s already useful to you. Help us make A-Fib.com the ‘go to’ site for Atrial Fibrillation patients and their families.

Please share this request. Pass it on.

Take our Reader Survey.

We Need Your Opinion!

How Are We Doing? 5-Question Reader Survey

How often do you visit A-Fib.com?
Do you read our monthly A-Fib Alerts newsletter?
Which of the following is most valuable to you (check one or more answers)?
What do you like most about A-Fib.com?

What can we do better? What are we missing? (If you want a response, include your email address.)

Why You Need an A-Fib Notebook and 3-Ring Binder

As you search for your Atrial Fibrillation cure, you will want to organize the information you are collecting. Start with a notebook and a three-ring binder or a file folder.

What to Include in Your A-Fib Binder

Your A-Fib binder is where you should file and organize all your A-Fib-related treatment information, such as:

• contact list of all health care providers and facilities
• lab test results, EKG strips and other medical records
• office visit notes and phone calls
• list of all medications
• health insurance claims and records
• records of any major medical event from the past two years
• completed worksheets and blanks ready for use
• research from the internet or medical center library

Available free worksheets: 10 Questions to Ask Before Taking Any Drug; 10 Questions to Ask When Interviewing any Doctor; Pre-visit First Appointment Worksheet; Keep an Inventory List of Your Medications

Make Medical Record-Keeping a Habit Graphic at A-Fib.com

Make Medical Record-Keeping a Habit

Make Medical Record-Keeping a Habit

We strongly encourage you to get in the habit of keeping a copy of every test result you get in your three-ring binder. Don’t leave your doctor’s office, medical center or hospital without a copy of every test or procedure they perform. If the test result isn’t immediately available, have them mail it to you.

If you are missing some records, read our article, How to Request Copies of your Medical Records. We give you three ways to request your medical records from your doctors and medical providers.

Add Your Personal A-Fib Summary

My personal A-Fib Medical summary at A-Fib.com

Doctors appreciate knowledgeable, informed, and prepared patients. Each doctor will probably ask you much the same questions.

For efficiency, prepare your ‘Personal A-Fib Medical Summary’ and include a copy with each packet of medical records you send to doctors. Store the original and copies in your binder.

See our article on how to create Your Personal A-Fib Medical Summary.

Atrial Fibrillation is a progressive disease Infographic at A-Fib.com

Click to enlarge this Infographic

Packets for Each New Doctor

Your A-Fib Binder holds all the information you need when seeing a new doctor (or interviewing a prospective doctor). You will want to send ahead of time a packet with your medical records, test results, and any applicable images or X-rays.

Monitor Progress of your A-Fib

Because A-Fib is a progressive disease, you should track if your heart’s measurements are getting worse, and by how much.

Ask your doctor for details of your heart dimensions and functions, including the diameter and volume of the left atrium, your Ejection Fraction (EF) and any other test results.

For future reference, store this benchmark data in your A-Fib binder.

Your A-Fib Binder is a Valuable Resource.
It will help you find your A-Fib cure!

That Demon on Your Shoulder Called ‘A-Fib-Zebub’

For Atrial Fibrillation Awareness Month, we are introducing a little character called “That Demon A-Fib-Zebub“. He’s that little voice that’s whispers in your ear “You don’t look sick! A-Fib’s not that bad. You can live with it”.


That little voice has a name: A-Fib Zebub.

When That Demon A-Fib-Zebub pops up, it time to remember that A-Fib is not benign, but a progressive disease. It’s not a “nuisance arrhythmia” as some doctors consider it.

And you should not just “take your meds and get used to it” (as one doctor told his patient). Who wants this demon on their shoulder?

From time to time, That Demon A-Fib-Zebub will float into our infographics and posts.

Don’t Settle for a Lifetime on Meds: Aim for A Cure

A-Fib is definitely curable. (I was cured of my A-Fib in 1998). If you have A-Fib, no matter how long you’ve had it, you should aim for a complete and permanent cure.

Don’t listen to A-Fib-Zebub. Instead, seek encouragement from other patients. Select from our list of over 80 Personal A-Fib stories of Hope to learn how others are dealing with this demon we call Atrial Fibrillation.

Do not learn to live with Atrial Fibrillation. 

Seek Your Cure!


Announcing: The A-Fib.com Advisory Board

I’m proud to announce the launch of The A-Fib.com Advisory Board.

Since the start of A-Fib.com in 2002, many cardiac electrophysiologists (EP) and surgeons have given me invaluable advice and support. They have helped make our website the ‘go-to’ destination for over 350,000 visitors a year. In fact, for three years running, we’ve been recognized by Healthline.com as a top A-Fib blog.

It’s a great blessing to be able to tap into the knowledge and experience of these talented professionals when writing on a difficult A-Fib subject or to get help for an A-Fib.com reader with a difficult case.

From all regions of the U.S., and from France, The Netherlands, Switzerland and Australia, these doctors may not always agree with all my positions, but they try to point me in the right direction.

The A-Fib.com Advisory Board is my way to publicly thank them and acknowledge their continued support. We invite readers to browse the names of members and their affiliations.

Visit our “About Us” to find the link to The A-Fib.com Advisory Board page (or use the ‘Search” box).

September is A-Fib Awareness Month: Share our Infographic

Infographic - September is Atrial Fibrillation Month at A-Fib.com

Click image to see full Infographic.

This is the month we focus on reaching those who may have Atrial Fibrillation and don’t know it.

An estimated 30%−50% of those affected with Atrial Fibrillation are unaware they have it—often only learning about their A-Fib during a routine medical exam.

Of untreated patients, 35% will suffer a stroke. Half of all A-Fib-related strokes are major and disabling.

To spread the word about Atrial Fibrillation, A-Fib.com offers a new infographic to educate and inform the public about this healthcare issue.

See the full infographic here. (Then Share it, Pin it, Download it.)

My Top Articles About Exercise and Atrial Fibrillation

My Top 3 Articles - Exercise and A-Fib 400 sq at 96 resby Steve S. Ryan, PhD

When you develop A-Fib, you have to think seriously about changing your exercising routine. In general, you want to do whatever you can to stay active and exercise normally. Review these articles to help you determine the right choices for you.

1. Exercising During an Episode: “When I’m having A-Fib symptoms, should I go ahead and exercise as I would normally?

2. Returning to “Normal” Exercise Level: “I love to exercise and I’m having a catheter ablation. Can I return to what’s ‘normal’ exercise for me? 

3. Exercise to Improve Circulation: “Is there any way I can improve my circulation, without having to undergo a Catheter Ablation or Surgery?

Do Whatever You Can to Stay Active

Having Atrial Fibrillation doesn’t mean you have to stop exercising, but you have to be smart about it. (In some people, light exercise helps get them out of an A-Fib attack. In others, like me when I had A-Fib, exercise makes it worse.) Do whatever you can to stay active even though you have A-Fib.

Additional Resources

Guide to DIY Heart Rate Monitors: A-Fib patients sometimes want to monitor their heart rate and pulse when exercising. A consumer ‘DIY” monitor can be useful. Continue reading…

Lessons You Can Learn About Intense Exercise: Why Elite Athletes Develop A-Fib. Continue reading…

My Search for the Best 7-Day Medicine/Vitamin Organizer

By Patti J. Ryan

Do you struggle with the daily mix of supplements and prescriptions you take? Some are small, but some are horse-pill size! Some you take in the AM, others you take in the PM.

Trying to find the right pill organizer has been a trial for me. Most often the compartments are too small and hard to open.

EZ Dose 7-Day AM/PM organizer at A-Fib.com

EZ Dose 7-Day AM/PM organizer with push-button lids

I Found the Best Organizer

After years of trial and effort, I’ve FINALLY found a great pill organizer―the EZY Dose AM/PM 7-Day Push Button organizer.

This 7-day organizer has two rows for AM/PM dosages with large letters for the days of the week.

Compartments are extra large―about 1 1/8″ wide by 1 3/8″ deep. That’s large enough for those ‘horse pill’ size tablets. The compartments have rounded bottoms― making it effortless to get the pills out. And the cherry on top? Push button lids―easy open and easy close.

EZY Dose - 4-times a day organizer

EZY Dose – 4-times a day organizer

Do you carry your meds with you? The EZY Dose is also compact and portable for carrying in your purse or jacket pocket.

Note: If you take pills four times a day, there’s an EZY Dose for you too: 7-Day XL Medtime Planner

Use our Link to Amazon.com and Support A-Fib.com

For my needs, I bought two 7-Day EZY Dose organizers from Amazon.com, so I’m set for two weeks at fill up time.

amazon_logo white square

Use our Amazon.com portal link: Here’s a link to get two EZY Dose AM/PM 7-Day Push Button organizers and Free Amazon Prime shipping. (Purchases through our portal link helps support A-Fib.com―at no extra cost to you!)

The EZY Dose AM/PM 7-Day organizer is also available from other retail and online sources.

Pinterest: My Best A-Fib.com Posts

A-Fib.com on Pinerest


I’m traveling for a few days, so this post has to be short, but not necessarily brief! Did you know I’ve listed my Best A-Fib News posts from 2015 on Pinterest? Each year Patti and I write about 150 posts, so we selected the best ‘evergreen’ posts for you.

To browse through our hand-picked selections, just click the Pinterest logo and click on a few picks.  You may find something you have missed or want to reread.

Ellen Degeneres on A-Fib.com

Ellen D.

Just For Fun

What do Mother Theresa, Ellen Degeneres and Vice President Dick Cheney have in common? If you guessed Atrial Fibrillation, you’re right! For fun, look at our board with 50 Celebs with A-Fib!

My Top 5 Picks: DIY Heart Rate & Handheld ECG Monitors

By Steve S. Ryan, PhD

Many A-Fib patients want to monitor their heart rate when exercising or when performing physically demanding activities, i.e., mowing the lawn, loading equipment, etc. (I wore one when I had A-Fib.) A consumer ‘DIY” monitor or Handheld ECG monitor may meet this need.

My Top 5 Picks for DIY Heart Rate & Handheld ECG Monitors

To get you started, here are my Top 5 Picks. 
These products are available from many online sources, but to make it easy for you and to read my other recommendations, see my ‘Wish List’ on Amazon.com. (Note: Use our Amazon portal link, and your purchases help support A-Fib.com.) 

Polar FT2 Heart Rate Monitor at A-Fib.com1. Polar FT2 Heart Rate Monitor

Used by runners and other athletes, this basic model has a clear, LARGE number display of your heart rate (as number).

The included Polar FT2 chest strap picks up the electrical signals from your heart and transmits to the wrist watch. Simple one-button start. Includes FT2 Getting Started Guide.

Also look at Polar FT1. Polar is my brand of choice, but there are many good brands.

2. Polar RS300X Heart Rate Monitor

A more advanced Polar model. Water resistant. Many built-in fitness features in addition to displaying your heart rate as a number (not a tracing). The included H1 heart rate sensor chest strap sends a continuous heart rate signal to the wrist watch.

Also look at Polar FT4; in colors.

Polar H7 Bluetooth Heart Rate Sensor & Fitness Tracker 150 x 75 pix at 300 res3. Polar H7 Bluetooth Heart Rate Sensor (Chest Strap)

Bluetooth-compatible heart rate sensor chest strap; Pair it with an app on your iPhone, iPad and Android device (instead of the Polar wrist watch).

AliveCor 250 x 150 pix at 300 res4. AliveCor Mobile ECG for Apple and Android devices

For ECG tracings. Attaches to most smartphones and works with tablets. Records and displays an actual medical-grade ECG in just 30 seconds that you can share with your doctor. Shows whether your heart rhythm is normal or if atrial fibrillation is ‘detected’.

BioMedetrucs Performance Monitor 150 x 110 pix at 300 res5. BodiMetrics Performance Monitor

For ECG tracings & more. Stand alone unit captures and displays actual ECG and other vitals in less than 20 seconds. Palm-size, slips into your pocket or purse. Wireless, syncs with your Android or iPhone. More than just heart activity, set goals with daily reminders, etc.

BONUSFacelake Fl400 Pulse Oximeter

Many A-Fib patients also suffer with sleep apnea. An easy way to check is to measure your blood’s oxygen level. A reading of 90% or lower means you should talk to your doctor, you may need a sleep study.


Consumer Heart Rate Monitors by Polar

Guides to DIY HRMs

Learn More About DIY Heart Rate Monitors

For more information about these monitors, see my Guide to DIY Heart Rate Monitors & Handheld ECG Monitors (Part I).

To learn how they work, see DIY Heart Rate Monitors: How They Work For A-Fib Patients (Part II).

Reduce Your Family’s Risk of Arrhythmia: Don’t Store Food in Plastic

The harmful chemical compound, BPA, may have been removed from many plastic bottles and food packaging, but “BPA-free” products may not be much safer.

The BPA chemical replacements, BPS and BPF, can also leach into food and beverages and may have the same impact on the human body (heart problems, as well as cancer, infertility and other health issues).

BPA Replacement Linked to Arrhythmias in Female Rats

Kinetic GoGreen Glasslock Elements food storage at A-Fib.com

Avoid BPS leaching: Use glass or ceramic containers to store or microwave food

A study published in the Journal Environmental Health Perspectives (Seltenrich) shows that the chemical compound BPS has nearly identical impacts on the cardiovascular system of rats as those previously reported for BPA. Researchers reported a link between BPS and irregular heartbeat. More research is needed.

What to Do: It Doesn’t Hurt To Be Cautious

Water bottle - Got A-Fib-Lets Talk at A-Fib.com

Aluminum water bottle at Spreadshirt.com

To reduce your risk of arrhythmia from BPS/BPF, decrease or eliminate your use of plastic storage containers for food or drink.

Drink from steel or glass containers, not plastic ones.

Don’t microwave your food in plastic containers. The heat from the microwave can separate BPA-like compounds from plastic containers, making them easier to ingest. If you must use plastic containers, avoid the microwave.

Ideally, just store food in ceramic, glass or stainless steel containers in the first place.

To read more, see the April 2015 TIME magazine article by Justin Worland, Why ‘BPA-Free’ May Be Meaningless.
References for this article

My Top 7 Picks: Books for A-Fib Patients and Their Families

By Steve S. Ryan, PhD

Knowledge is power. Educate yourself about Atrial Fibrillation. Empower yourself as a patient. Learn to see through the hype of healthcare websites!
My top 7 A-Fib reference books and guides at A-Fib.com

My Top 7 Recommendations for A-Fib Patients and Their Families

For patients and their families, these are our favorite books about A-Fib as well as patient empowerment, unmasking the facts behind health statistics, the importance of Magnesium supplements and insights into the pharmaceutical industry. And a Bonus: the best medical dictionary for A-Fib patients.

These books and guides are available from many online sources, but to make it easy for you (and to read my other recommendations), see my ‘Wish List’ on Amazon.com. (Note: Use our Amazon portal link, and your purchases help support A-Fib.com.) 

Beat Your A-Fib book cover at A-Fib.com1. Beat Your A-Fib: The Essential Guide to Finding Your Cure: Written in everyday language for patients with Atrial Fibrillation

A-Fib can be cured! That’s the theme of this book written by a former A-Fib patient and publisher of the patient education website, A-Fib.com. Empowers patients to seek their cure. Written in plain language for A-Fib patients and their families.

Practice Guide to Heart Rhythm Problems at A-Fib.com2. A Patient’s Guide to Heart Rhythm Problems (A Johns Hopkins Press Health Book)

Up-to-date resource on heart arrhythmias. Good overview of the heart and its functions. Several good chapters on Atrial Flutter and Atrial Fibrillation. Also a very good chapter entitled ‘Defensive Patienting’.

Medifocus Guide to Atrial Fibrillation report cover at A-Fib.com3. Medifocus Guidebook on: Atrial Fibrillation

Updated annually. Categories of research studies, drug therapies and non-drug therapies. Synopis only. Must find full-length documents online or at a library. For current issue go to: http://tinyurl.com/MedifocusGuide-AFIB

The Magnesium Miracle book cover at A-Fib.com4. The Magnesium Miracle (Revised and Updated Edition)

Comprehensive book on the importance and helpful benefits of magnesium as well as just what a magnesium deficiency causes. Easy-to-read with organized sections and easy-to-use dosing recommendations. Best seller on Amazon.com

Know Your Chances book cover at A-Fib.com5. Know Your Chances: Understanding Health Statistics

Do you question the facts behind today’s barrage of health risk messages? Unmask the truth. Learn to see through the hype in medical news, TV drug ads and pitches from advocacy groups.

The Empowered Patient book cover at A-Fib.com6. The Empowered Patient: How to Get the Right Diagnosis, Buy the Cheapest Drugs, Beat Your Insurance Company, and Get the Best Medical Care Every Time

Excellent resource. Learn about the times when we need to be a ‘bad patient’. It’s okay to ‘rock the boat’ or be a ‘nuisance’. When it comes to medicine, trust no one completely. Everyone should read this book.

Bad Pharma book cover at A-Fib.com7. Bad Pharma: How Drug Companies Mislead Doctors and Harm Patients

A real eye-opener to the decades-long goals and tactics of the pharmaceutical industry to create and maintain demand for their products. A must read for anyone taking prescription meds for the long-term (i.e. hypertension, high cholesterol, etc.).

Oxford Concise Medical Dictionary book cover at A-Fib.comBONUS: Concise Medical Dictionary (Oxford Quick Reference)

An  excellent medical dictionary, the best I’ve found for patients with Atrial Fibrillation who are conducting research into their best treatment options. Includes occasional illustrations (for fun check p. 276 for the types of fingerprint patterns).

Read More, Learn More

Knowledge is power. Educate yourself and become your own best patient advocate!

To see my complete list of all items I recommend for A-Fib patients and their families, see my list on Amazon.com: By a Former A-Fib Patient: My Recommended Products.

What's working for you? Share your tips at A-Fib.com

Email us what’s working for you.

Share Your Tip

Do you have a favorite book that has helped you with your Atrial Fibrillation? Email me about it.

Is a specific treatment working for you? Have lifestyle changes helped? Or, perhaps, an alternative or homeopathic remedy?

Won’t you email us and share your tip?

Conflicts of Interest—The Hidden Cost of Free Lunch for Doctors

by Steve S. Ryan, PhD, updated September 18, 2016

Few people in the U.S. today are shocked or scandalized that the Drug and Device Industry (DDI) basically bribes doctors and hospitals to prescribe their drugs or use their equipment. It’s so commonly done that we take it for granted.

In the U.S., in general, it isn’t considered unethical or immoral for doctors to accept payments or favors from the Drug and Device Industry (DDI). Nor is it illegal.

But soon U.S. patients will be able to simply type in our doctor’s name in the Open Payments Database and see how much they are being paid by the DDI and what conflicts of interest they have.

Open Payments DataThanks to the Sunshine Act (a provision of the U.S. 2010 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act), the DDI must report when they make a payment to a doctor for meals, promotional speaking or other activities.

This data is available at https://projects.propublica.org/docdollars/ Just type in your doctor’s name. See also, OpenPaymentData.CMS.gov and the ProPublica Dollars for Docs project.

Influencing Doctors’ Prescriptions for the Price of a Meal

In a recent JAMA Internal Medicine report (DeJong, C., June 2016), the authors compared meal payments to doctors with the drugs they prescribed to Medicare patients.

Even doctors who accepted only one free meal were more likely to prescribe the brand name drug.

Not surprisingly, they found that physicians who accept free meals from a drug company are more likely to prescribe that company’s brand name drugs rather than cheaper (and usually more proven) generic drugs. This study only focused on physicians who received meals.

Even doctors who accepted only one free meal were more likely to prescribe the brand name drug. Doctors who accepted four or more meals were far more likely to prescribe brand name drugs than doctors who accepted no meals. Furthermore, doctors who accepted more expensive meals prescribed more brand name drugs.

In another related JAMA Internal Medicine report (Yeh, JS, June 2016), researchers found similar evidence that industry payments to physicians are associated with higher rates of prescribing brand-name statins.

Steer Clear of Conflicts of Interest

The publication, Bottom Line Personal, offered words of wisdom on this subject.

“Studies have found that when there is a conflict of interest, it is almost impossible for even well-meaning people to see things objectively.”

Dr. Dan Ariely of Duke University described how, if a doctor must choose between two procedures, they are likely to pick the one that has the better outcome for their bottom line.

“That doesn’t mean the doctor is unethical…it just means he is human. We truly seem to not realize how corrosive conflicts of interest are to honesty and objectivity.”

He advocates that we steer clear of people and organizations with conflicts of interest “because it does not appear to be possible to overcome conflicts of interest.”

Conflicts of Interest: Be Suspicious of Doctors

Doctors are only human. If a drug rep gets them great tickets to a sporting event, for example, of course they will be inclined to favor that rep’s drug.

Whenever you visit a health/heart website ask yourself: “Who owns this site?” and “What is their agenda?”

But be suspicious if your doctor tells you:

• to take an expensive new drug
• to just “live with your A-Fib”
• insists that catheter ablation is too dangerous or unproven
• that A-Fib can’t be cured
• that you have to take drugs for the rest of your life

If this happens to you, RUN and get a second opinion (and even a third opinion).

Conflicts of Interest: Be Suspicious of Health/Heart Websites

When I attend talks at most A-Fib conferences, the first slide a presenter shows is often a list of their Conflicts of Interest.

But this is not required of websites! Health/Heart websites are not required to be transparent and reveal their conflicts of interest.

Whenever you visit a health/heart website ask yourself: “Who owns this site?” and “What is their agenda?” (Hint: Check their list of “sponsors” and follow the money!)

Drug Industry Owns or Influences Most Heart/Health Web sites

The drug and device industry owns, operates or influences almost every health/heart related web site on the Internet!

The fact is most health/heart web sites are supported by drug companies who donate most of their funding.

For example, did you know that the drug company Ely Lilly partially owns and operates WebMD, the Heart.org, Medscape.com, eMedicine.com and many other health web sites?

The fact is that most health/heart web sites are supported by drug companies who donate most of their funding. Consider how that may affect the information they put on their web sites―they’re not going to bite the hand that feeds them.


About A-Fib.com: Read A-Fib.com disclosures on our website and check
A-Fib.com’s 990s at GuideStar.org.

Be Suspicious of A-Fib Info on the Internet

Steve Ryan video at A-Fib.com

Video: Buyer Beware of Misleading or Inaccurate A-Fib Information.

In our crazy world, you can’t afford to trust anything you read on the Internet.

At one time I tried to keep track of all the mis-information found on various A-Fib web sites. When we’d find something wrong, we would write the site. I don’t think we’ve ever received a reply. Finally, we gave up. (See my video: Buyer Beware of Misleading or Inaccurate A-Fib Information.)

Many web sites put out biased or mis-information. Be skeptical. You can tell if someone is trying to pull the wool over your eyes. Truth will out. If you feel uncomfortable or that something is wrong with a site, it probably is. When you find a good site, the truth will jump out at you.

In today’s world, you have to do your own due diligence. You know what makes sense and what doesn’t.

For more, see my article: EP’s Million Dollar Club—Are Payments to Doctors Buying Influence?

References for this article


A-Fib Patient Conference Sept. 16-18, 2016 in Dallas

The 2016 Get in Rhythm, Stay in Rhythm™ Atrial Fibrillation Patient Conference will be September 16-18 at the Sheraton DFW Airport Hotel in Dallas, TX. For further info and to register, visit the Get in Rhythm, Stay in Rhythm conference website.

StopAfibOrg 200 x 80 pix at 96 resHosted by Mellanie True Hills, Founder and CEO of StopAfib.org, the Get in Rhythm, Stay in Rhythm™ Atrial Fibrillation Patient Conference is designed to give you the tools and information you need to take care of yourself, and to communicate effectively with your doctors and other healthcare professionals. Confirmed topics are listed in the “Agenda”. For presenters, go to the Get in Rhythm, Stay in Rhythm website and hover over each faculty photo.

Costs: Admission is $127–$157 (Early Bird rate) Special hotel rate is $119/night (normally up to $289/night). This special rate is good from 3 days before until 3 days after the conference (so you can vacation in Dallas before/after the conference).

Event Sponsors: The conference is made possible with support from industry sponsors including Bristol-Myers Squibb, Janssen, Boston Scientific and Medtronic. Co-sponsors include Heart Rhythm Society, MyAFibExperience.org and Health eHeart. Promotional partners include Alliance for Aging Research, American Sleep Apnea Association, WomenHeart.org and National Blood Clot Alliance.

Just for Fun Friday: The ECG Business Card

Startup company, MobilECG has created an electrocardiograph (ECG) business card as a novelty to promote their actual clinical product, a low cost ($150-$250) holter or resting ECG.

As long as you’re touching both of the business card’s scanner pads, the screen will show a basic but accurate ECG readout.

While it is not a diagnostic device, it is good enough to clearly capture the P, Q, R, S and T waves of the ECG signal.

Want one? You can sign up to get an email if/when it’s available (for about $29).

MobilECG Business Card


June 14th is World Blood Donor Day: Blood Connects Us All!

World Blood donor day sign at A-Fib.comAs a former A-Fib patient, I’m very much aware of blood as the most precious gift that anyone can give to another person — the gift of life.

I regularly donate blood (just donated last week). It’s invigorating to help others, and it doesn’t cost you anything but your time. (But be advised that certain A-Fib medications such as some blood thinners may preclude you from giving blood.)

Every year, on June 14th, countries around the world celebrate World Blood Donor Day. There is a constant need for regular blood supply because blood can be stored for only a limited time before use.

Regular blood donations by healthy people ensure that safe blood will be available whenever and wherever it is needed. A decision to donate your blood can save a life. For more, read Why should I donate blood?

Where Can I Donate Blood?

Quiz: How Much Do You Know About Blood Donation? At A-Fib.com

Quiz: How Much Do You Know About Donating Blood?

In the U.S. check The American National Red Cross website. In Canada, go to the Canadian Blood Service. In Australia, go the the Australia Red Cross. For 29 countries in the EU, go to the European Commission/Become a blood donor website. In other countries, check with your national health services.

Quiz: How Much Do You Know About Donating Blood?

Test your knowledge with this online quiz at the World Health Organization (WHO), sponsor of World Blood Donor Day.

Remember: Blood Connects Us All!


A-Fib.com 2016 Top-Rated by Healthline.com For Third Year

A-Fib.com top rated by Healthline.com for the third year.

A-Fib.com top rated by Healthline.com for the third year.

We are proud to announce, for the third year, A-Fib.com has been named to the Healthline.com list of the ‘Best Atrial Fibrillation Blogs’Atrial Fibrillation: Resources for Patients (A-Fib.com) is one of a ten websites selected for special recognition by the Healthline.com Marketing Team.

Of the ten heart health websites, A-Fib.com is one of only four websites dedicated exclusively to Atrial Fibrillation patient education. The other three are ‘Atrial Fibrillation by Dr. John M’ (Dr. John Mandrola),  ‘Living with Atrial Fibrillation’ (by our friend, Travis Van Slooten) and ‘Stop A-Fib Atrial Fibrillation Blog’.

About Healthline: Healthline.com is  the fastest growing consumer health information site — with 65 million monthly visitors. Their goal: “Healthline’s mission is to be your most trusted ally in your pursuit of health and well-being.”

From the Healthline.com article:

“We’ve carefully selected these blogs because they are actively working to educate, inspire, and empower their readers with frequent updates and high quality information…new medical research, personal stories, and helpful advice.”

Visit Healthline’s The 10 Best A-Fib Blogs of 2016 to review all ten winners.

OUR MISSION: A-Fib.com offers hope and guidance to empower patients to find their A-Fib cure or best outcome. We are your unbiased source of well-researched information on current and emerging Atrial Fibrillation treatments.

Did you read…Steve’s A-Fib Alerts: May 2016 Issue?

A-Fib patients around the world are reading the A-Fib Alerts May 2016 issue.

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Read the latest issue here. Even better—have our A-Fib Alerts sent directly to you via email. Subscribe NOW.

Our A-Fib Alerts monthly newsletter is presented in a condensed, easy-to-scan format. (There’s no risk! Unsubscribe at any time.) Subscribe NOW.

Special Signup Bonus: Subscribe HERE and receive discounts codes to save up to 50% off my book, Beat Your A-Fib: The Essential Guide to finding Your Cure by Steve S. Ryan, PhD.

Help Others with A-Fib: Share What’s Working for You

You’ve done your homework. You’ve learned about your A-Fib triggers. You’ve found some relief from your symptoms.

Why not share an insight or two with other patients with your same symptoms? Is a specific treatment working for you? Have lifestyle changes helped? Or, perhaps, an alternative or homeopathic remedy?

Won’t you email us and share your tip?

Sharing is What This Website is All About.

As Steve writes in his own personal A-Fib story: “I started A‑Fib.com to spare others the frustration, depression, and debilitating quality of life the disease caused me.” Won’t you join us in this noble effort?

Do it NOW! Send us an email. What can you share to help others deal with this ‘demon’ Atrial Fibrillation?

Send us a tip to help other A-Fib patients

Do it TODAY!
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P. S. Have more than a tip share? How about sharing your A-Fib story! Read how to write and submit your personal experience A-Fib story.

Your Nearest ‘Certified Stroke Center’ Could Save Your Life

A Certified Stroke Center could save your life or avert the debilitating effects of an A-Fib stroke. But only if you get there within four hours.

What is a Certified Stroke Center?

A certified or ‘Advanced Comprehensive Stroke Center’ is typically the largest and best-equipped hospital in a given geographical area that can treat any kind of stroke or stroke complication.

Only a fraction of the 5,800 acute-care hospitals in the U.S are certified as providing state-of-the-art stroke care.

Why Do I Need to Know the Closest?

If you have a stroke and get yourself to a Certified Stroke Center within four hours, there is a good chance specialists can dissolve the clot, and you won’t have any lasting damage. (Hurray, you dodged a bullet.)

A Certified Stroke Center will have drugs such as Tissue Plasminogen Activator (tPA) to dissolve the clot. They can use Clopidogrel or acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) to stop platelets from clumping together to form clots. Or use anticoagulants to keep existing blood clots from getting larger.

Be Prepared for a Stroke Emergency: Do Your Homework

We offer you two sources to look up the nearest certified or ‘Advanced Comprehensive Stroke Center’. Just enter your zip code or other parameter to see a map and list of centers:

Find A Certified U.S. Stroke Center Near You/NPR News
Find a Certified Comprehensive Stroke Center

How about your workplace? Find and post the closest ‘Advanced Comprehensive Stroke Center’.

Graphic: Keep your medical records in a binder or folder. A-Fib.com

Print the name, address and phone number of the closest Certified Stroke Center. Store extras in your A-Fib Records binder or folder.

Post at home for easy access during a medical emergency.

If EMT responders come to your home, tell them where to take you and give them a handout (insist they take you there).

For more tips on preparing your family in the event you have a stroke, see our FAQ and answer: In Case of Stroke, What Your Family Should Know Now.

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A-Fib.com top rated by Healthline.com for the third year.
A-Fib.com top rated by Healthline.com for the third year. 2014  2015  2016

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