Doctors & patients are saying about 'A-Fib.com'...


"A-Fib.com is a great web site for patients, that is unequaled by anything else out there."

Dr. Douglas L. Packer, MD, FHRS, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN

"Jill and I put you and your work in our prayers every night. What you do to help people through this [A-Fib] process is really incredible."

Jill and Steve Douglas, East Troy, WI 

“I really appreciate all the information on your website as it allows me to be a better informed patient and to know what questions to ask my EP. 

Faye Spencer, Boise, ID, April 2017

“I think your site has helped a lot of patients.”

Dr. Hugh G. Calkins, MD  Johns Hopkins,
Baltimore, MD


Doctors & patients are saying about 'Beat Your A-Fib'...


"If I had [your book] 10 years ago, it would have saved me 8 years of hell.”

Roy Salmon, Patient, A-Fib Free,
Adelaide, Australia

"This book is incredibly complete and easy-to-understand for anybody. I certainly recommend it for patients who want to know more about atrial fibrillation than what they will learn from doctors...."

Pierre Jaïs, M.D. Professor of Cardiology, Haut-Lévêque Hospital, Bordeaux, France

"Dear Steve, I saw a patient this morning with your book [in hand] and highlights throughout. She loves it and finds it very useful to help her in dealing with atrial fibrillation."

Dr. Wilber Su,
Cavanaugh Heart Center, 
Phoenix, AZ

"...masterful. You managed to combine an encyclopedic compilation of information with the simplicity of presentation that enhances the delivery of the information to the reader. This is not an easy thing to do, but you have been very, very successful at it."

Ira David Levin, heart patient, 
Rome, Italy

"Within the pages of Beat Your A-Fib, Dr. Steve Ryan, PhD, provides a comprehensive guide for persons seeking to find a cure for their Atrial Fibrillation."

Walter Kerwin, MD, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA


Media Library

Media Library

Newest Member of Our A-Fib Support Volunteers Was Diagnosed at Age 18

I’m pleased to welcome Warren Darakanada from Los Angeles, CA to our group of A-Fib Support Volunteers. At age 23, he’s one of our youngest volunteers. He hopes to be a resource for those patients closer to his age.

His cardiac health story started about 10 years ago. At age 13, a severe acne breakout landed him in the doctor’s office. While checking his vitals, a problem was found with his blood pressure (and an elevated cholesterol level). Warren shares:

Warren D.

“While the diastolic pressure was normal, the systolic was above 140 mmHg. Without a doubt, I needed to see a cardiologist. I went through a series of tests to rule out causes of secondary hypertension. Luckily or unluckily, nothing was found.
Over the next years, I had several EKGs, but it was not until a routine cardiologist visit when I was 18 that I was diagnosed with atrial fibrillation. I think I had A-Fib for some time prior to my diagnosis, but had no idea my heart beat was irregular. I was in shock! I didn’t know what to think or feel.
I was put on a beta-blocker and warfarin. Given my young age and the perpetual nature of atrial fibrillation, I knew I was headed toward a cardiac ablation.
Suffers Most from Mental and Psychological Effects: While I had few A-Fib symptoms, what I found hard to endure and most debilitating was the mental and psychological effects. I would ask myself:
‘Why is this happening to me and not anybody else?
Why can’t I go back to college and enjoy my freshman year with my friends?
Given all these circumstances, is my life worth living?’
These questions may sound stupid to a mature person in good mental condition. But that wasn’t me. Remember, I was only 18 years old and just starting college… Continue reading Warren’s story…
One-to-One, our A-Fib Support Volunteers are just an email away at A-Fib.com

Our A-Fib Support Volunteers Offer One-to-One Support

When you need someone who will listen and who understands A-Fib, our A-Fib Support Volunteers are just an email away. These volunteers have gone through a lot while seeking their A-Fib cure. They have been helped along the way and want to return the favor. Learn more.

At Age 13, Treatment for Acne Reveals Need for a Cardiologist! A-Fib Hits Early

Warren D.

By Warren Darakanada, Los Angeles, CA, August 2017

“As I write about my A-Fib, I am 23 and just starting my adult life as a financial and economic consultant. But my cardiac story actually starts about ten years ago.

At age 13, I got a severe acne breakout that brought me to the doctor’s office. While waiting to see the doctor, a nurse decided to take my vitals and blood pressure. While the diastolic pressure was normal, the systolic was above 140 mmHg. Without a doubt, I needed to see a cardiologist.

Further investigation revealed that I also had an elevated cholesterol level. Luckily, my blood glucose level was normal. I went through a series of tests to rule out causes of secondary hypertension. Luckily or unluckily, nothing was found.

Since I was a low-risk patient who could benefit from lifestyle modification, and given my age, I was not prescribed any medication or procedure.

At Age 18, A Shock to be Diagnosed with A-Fib!

Over the next years, I had several EKGs, but it was not until a routine cardiologist visit when I was 18 that I was diagnosed with atrial fibrillation. I think I had A-Fib for some time prior to my diagnosis, but had no idea my heart beat was irregular.

I was 18, and in shock! I didn’t know what to do. I didn’t know what to think or feel.

I was in shock! I didn’t know what to do. I didn’t know what to think or feel. The attending cardiologist called in medical residents and fellows to show them that “this is what atrial fibrillation sounds like” through the stethoscope.

Referred to an electrophysiologist, I was put on a beta-blocker and warfarin. Given my young age and the perpetual nature of atrial fibrillation, I knew I was headed toward a cardiac ablation.

[For someone as young as Warren, it’s unthinkable to leave him taking dangerous A-Fib drugs for a lifetime (60 or 70 years). In addition, a catheter ablation was his most reasonable option with a high success rate in young people like Warren.]

Suffers Most from Mental and Psychological Effects

While I had few A-Fib symptoms, what I found hard to endure and most debilitating was the mental and psychological effects. I would ask myself:

‘Why is this happening to me and not anybody else?
Why can’t I go back to college and enjoy my freshman year with my friends?
Given all these circumstances, is my life worth living?’

These questions may sound stupid to a mature person in good mental condition. But that wasn’t me. Remember, I was only 18 years old and just starting college, and college students are prone to depression for various reasons. (See Seven Ways to Cope with the Fear and Anxiety of A-Fib)

My solution: Instead of staying home and pondering about these life problems, I decided to keep myself busy with activities, online classes, and occasional meet-ups with friends.

In hindsight, that helped tremendously.

My Catheter Ablation

It was roughly 3 months between my diagnosis and my ablation in March 2013. So, I only “knowingly” lived with A-Fib for a few months before my ablation.

The day of my RF catheter ablation came just as any other day. I had been admitted the night before. Except for not eating after 9 pm, I did nothing to prepare myself for it. I think the procedure lasted about 1 1/2 hours. I stayed in the hospital overnight.

As a child, I had had many surgeries, so hospitalization was not a big deal. (To keep this short, I’ll skip my childhood medical history.)

Post Ablation

After the procedure, I was almost always in sinus rhythm. But my atrial fibrillation would come back intermittently. Most episodes were really short with the frequency decreasing over time. [This is common during the three-month ‘blanking period’ following an ablation.]

However, because my heart rate was not well controlled and because of the risks of recurrences, I was put on diltiazem, a calcium channel blocker.

Because of my hypertension and high cholesterol (added risk factors of atrial fibrillation), I am also on Cozaar and a statin.

Now A-Fib-Free 

Since I started diltiazem, I’ve not had an episode…except one time after being under general anesthesia. The cardiologist believes that was a side effect of propofol [used to help you relax before and during general anesthesia for surgery].

It would be great if I could live without my various medications, but taking them, honestly, is not a big deal.

Lessons Learned

Emotionally Stronger and Healthier: I feel the entire A-Fib/ablation process has made me an emotionally stronger person. I also started to work out and take care of my own health more. (But that’s also a function of becoming more mature with age rather than the ablation alone.)

In the process, I have learned to enjoy and appreciate life in the way most people my age could never do.

I have learned to enjoy and appreciate life in ways others my age could never do.

Atrial Fibrillation―It Comes in a Package: By that I mean, cardiovascular disorders often come “packaged” together, often congenitally and genetically.

I’m trying to suggest that people with A-Fib/arrhythmia often have other cardiovascular risk factors. For instance, I have hypertension and high cholesterol and a family history thereof.

Moreover, cardiovascular diseases are also risk factors of diseases for other organs, such as the kidneys and liver.

My advice for younger patients diagnosed with Atrial Fibrillation:

Exercise: I would suggest that young adults work out more, at least 3 times a week for one hour each time.

Seek Help for Mental Health: For those suffering from A-Fib, make sure that you have a good attitude. Seek counseling if you have mental conditions from A-Fib.

Evaluate & Reduce Other Risk Factors:  Young A-Fib patients should also see general cardiologists to evaluate A-Fib related risk factors.

When young people get A-Fib, they could be living with it for possibly more than 50 years. Take actions to reduce your risk factors and take care of your body.

Positive Attitude Trumps All: I’m dealing with my ‘package’ of conditions. While getting rid of my ‘package’ once and for all might not be an option for me, I can choose to live with a positive attitude.

I welcome your emails.”

Warren Darakananda
warrenddara(at)gmail.com

Editor’s Comments:
We are most grateful to Warren for his frank discussion of how A-Fib affected him psychologically and emotionally. He was only 18 years old when diagnosed with A-Fib and just starting college. He’s learned the hard way how to develop a “positive attitude.”
Psychological Distress:  For Warren, the psychological effects were hard to endure, much more so than his physical symptoms.
Recent research indicates that “psychological distress” worsens A-Fib symptoms’ severity. For many patients the anxiety, fear, worry and depression can become debilitating.
To learn how to deal with the psychological aspect, see my article, Seven Ways to Cope with the Fear and Anxiety of A-Fib.
A-Fib Support Volunteers: I’m pleased to welcome Warren to our group of A-Fib Support Volunteers. He hopes to be a resource for those patients closer to his age. (He’s one of our youngest volunteers.)
We are blessed to have many generous people who have volunteered to help others get through their A-Fib ordeal. Most A-Fib Support Volunteers are not medical personnel. They come from widely different backgrounds. But you can be sure they care about you and understand what you are going through. Visit our A-Fib Support Volunteers page to learn more.

Magnesium Deficiency & Fatal Arrhythmias: Two Videos with Dr. Carolyn Dean

Mineral deficiencies like magnesium (Mg) can force the heart into fatal arrhythmias. Magnesium is one of the most common nutritional deficiencies. It’s chronically lacking in most diets. Almost everyone with A-Fib is magnesium deficient.

Two Videos About Magnesium Deficiency with Dr. Dean

C. Dean, MD

We have two videos in our A-Fib Video Library featuring Dr. Carolyn Dean, author of The Magnesium Miracle, talking about magnesium deficiency and calcium overload:

The Best Way to Supplement Magnesium” with Dr. Carolyn Dean. Getting nutrients through food is not always possible; discusses side effects of too much Mg and how you can tell if you have a deficiency.(3:39) Go to video.

Importance of Balancing Calcium & Magnesium”. Dr. Dean discusses the importance of balancing your intake of magnesium and calcium (2:1); the benefits of both and why you need to have both in the body; the problem of ‘calcium overload’. (2:30) Go to video.

Should You Take Magnesium Supplements?

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As Dr. Carolyn Dean states, it’s hard to get enough magnesium from today’s food. Magnesium has been depleted from the soil by industrial scale farming. Therefore, A-Fib patients should consider taking magnesium supplements. (Note: it takes about 6 months of magnesium supplements to build up healthy level of Mg.)

For more about magnesium, see my article: Cardiovascular Benefits of Magnesium: Insights for Atrial Fibrillation Patients.

Video: A Live Case of Catheter Ablation for Long-Standing Persistent A-Fib Through 3D Mapping & ECG Images

Presented entirely through 3D mapping and ECG images, a live demo of ablation for long-standing, persistent A-Fib is followed from start to finish. Titles identify each step. No narration, music track only (I turned down the volume as the music track was distracting.)

3D mapping and ECG images show the technique of transseptal access, 3D mapping, PV isolation, and ablating additional drivers of AF in the posterior wall and left atrial appendage. (8:03) Produced by Dr. James Ong, Heart Rhythm Specialist of Southern California.

NOTE: Before viewing this video, you should already have some basic understanding of cardiac anatomy and A-Fib physiology.


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Video: Stroke Prevention in A-Fib and Anticoagulant Therapy

Through interviews and animations explains how atrial fibrillation can cause stroke and why anticoagulation is so important. Discussion of warfarin (brand name Coumadin), the required (weekly or monthly) monitoring, interactions with food, alcohol and other drugs and the newer anticoagulants (NOACs).

Developed in association with Boehringer Ingelheim [one manufacturer of the new NOACs]. (5:36)

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Video: When Drug Therapy Fails: Why Patients Consider Catheter Ablation

For Insidermedicine.com. Dr. Susan M. Sharma discusses why patients with atrial fibrillation turn to ablation when drug therapy doesn’t work. Presenting research findings by David J. Wilber and MD; Carlo Pappone, MD, Dr. Sharma discusses the success rates of drug therapy versus catheter ablation. (See transcript below.) (3:00 min.) Published Jan. 26, 2010 on Insidermedicine.com.

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Transcript of this video
Research Reference for this Video

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VIDEO: Catheter Ablation For A-Fib: What it is, How it’s Done and What Results Can Be Expected

Dr. Patrick Tchou and Dr. Bryan Baranowski, cardiologists from the Cleveland Clinic describe the catheter ablation procedure for the treatment of atrial fibrillation (A-Fib), what it is, how it’s done and what results can be expected from this surgery.

Excellent animations: showing A-Fib’s chaotic signals, and the pattern of ablation scars around the openings to the pulmonary veins. By the Cleveland Clinic (4:00 min.)

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Video: Inside the EP Lab with Dr. James Ong: Using Mapping & CT Scan Technologies During a Pulmonary Vein Isolation

Cardiac Electrophysiologist Dr. James Ong begins with a brief tour of the EP lab and control room; Dr. Ong explains how pulmonary vein isolation is done with radiofrequency ablation to cure atrial fibrillation.

Included are: Mapping technology; the Virtual Geometrical shell of the heart displayed next to the CT scan; Placement of the catheter, real time tracking; the Complex Fractionated Electrogram (CFE) Map used to identify and eliminate the extra drivers (aside from the pulmonary veins). (6:01) From a series of videos by Dr. Ong, Heart Rhythm Specialists of Southern California.

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Video: Understanding Mini-Maze Ablation with Cardiac Surgeon Dr. Dipin Gupta

Cardiothoracic surgeon Dipin Gupta, MD, discusses this minimally invasive surgical treatment for persistent atrial fibrillation. Mini-Maze Ablation is done without open-heart surgery and using a small incision on the side of the chest.

Dr. Gupta is with MedStar Heart Institute & Vascular Institute at MedStar Union Memorial Hospital. Published  Mar 31, 2015, by MedStar Heart & Vascular Institute and Cleveland Clinic (4:35)

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Video: An Impulse That’s Lost its Way—Insight to A-Fib, the Most Common Arrhythmia

A medical description of the mechanism and effects of Atrial Fibrillation (i.e., initiating triggers, abnormal substrate, electrical and structural remodeling, blood stasis and hypercoagulable state, etc.).

Animation with narration. 3:24 min. Uploaded by OverdrivePacing, Feb 8, 2012.

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EO: “Know Your Pulse: It Could Save Your Life” Awareness Campaign

As an A-Fib patient, do you know how to take your pulse? This short video explains why and how to take your pulse.

From the Arrhythmia Alliance (A-A) and The Heart Rhythm Charity in the UK. (Our British friend Trudie Lobban is Founder and Trustee.) 1:56 min.

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New Video Added to A-Fib Library

We’ve add a video to our library of Atrial Fibrillation videos:

Mechanism and effects of Atrial Fibrillation

An Impulse That’s Lost its Way

A medical description of the mechanism and effects of Atrial Fibrillation (i.e., initiating triggers, abnormal substrate, electrical and structural remodeling, blood stasis and hypercoagulable state, etc.). Animation with narration.

Difficulty level: Intermediate. 3:24 min. Watch video.

A-Fib.com Library of Videos and Animations

We have loads of A-Fib-related videos in our Video Library. For the reader who learns visually through motion graphics, audio, and personal interviews, these short videos are organized loosely into three levels: introductory/basic, intermediate and in-depth/advanced. Click to browse our video library.

Click image to go to video.

A Popular Video: Buyer Beware of Misleading or Inaccurate A-Fib Information’, with Steve Ryan and host, Skip E. Lowe. Click image to go to video.

Steve Ryan Videos: We’ve edited Steve’s most interesting radio and TV interviews to create several short (3-5 min.) videos. Check out Videos Featuring Steve S. Ryan, PhD, publisher of A-Fib.com.

3:59 min. Click to Watch video.

My Top 5 Articles About Warfarin Therapy, Associated Risks and Alternatives

my-top-5-picks-stamp-warfarin-400-pix-sq-at-96-res

Any treatment plan for Atrial Fibrillation must address the increased risk of clots and stroke. By far the most commonly used medicine for stroke prevention is the anticoagulant warfarin (brand name Coumadin).

But warfarin is a tough drug to take long term with monthly blood tests and possible side effects. These are my top 5 articles to help you understand warfarin therapy, the associated risks and some of the alternatives.

Review these articles to learn more about Warfarin therapy:

1. Clinical Trials Results: Watchman Better Than a Lifetime on Warfarin;

2. Arterial Calcification From Warfarin: Vitamin K May Reverse it;

3. “Is there a way to get off blood thinners all together? I hate taking Coumadin. I know I’m at risk of an A-Fib stroke.”;

4. How to Avoid the Bleeding Risk of Anticoagulants;

5. If Sixty and Older: 99% Have Microbleeds—So Are Anticoagulants Risky?

Bonus: Video about Warfarin

A-Fib.com video libraryLiving with Warfarin: Patient Education
Excellent introduction to anticoagulant therapy with warfarin (Coumadin). Patients and medical professionals (clinical nurse, doctors, a pharmacist  and clinical dietician) discuss the practical issues associated with taking warfarin. (16:22) Uploaded on Mar 7, 2011. Produced by Johns Hopkins Medicine.

An Alternative to Blood Thinners

WATCHMAN device at A-Fib.com

The WATCHMAN device

Do you hate having to take Coumadin? Hate the monthly testing? Bothered by side effects? An alternative to taking blood thinners is closing off your Left Atrial Appendage (LAA) with the Watchman, an occlusion device. Learn more: The Watchman™ Device: The Alternative to Blood Thinners.

My Top 5 Picks: Intro A-Fib Videos for the Newly Diagnosed

A-Fib.com video libraryThe A-Fib.com Video Library is for those readers who learn visually through motion graphics, audio, personal interviews and animations.
These are my top 5 picks of basic videos for the newly diagnosed patient or anyone who wants to better understand Atrial Fibrillation. Great for the A-Fib patient’s family, friends and co-workers.

1. How Your Heart Works and Understanding Arrhythmias

Video frame - Understanding Arrhythmias - CU 150 pix at 96 res

Understanding Arrhythmias

Animation of the normal heart with narration. Illustrations of the four steps of every heart beat; Identifies the parts of the heart. Describes heart arrhythmias; Visualizes how during an arrhythmia, the heart may not be able to pump enough blood to all parts of the body, especially to the brain. The lack of blood flow can damage the brain, heart, and other organs. (1:33) Posted by Apollo Hospitals Dhaka.

2. Stroke Prevention in A-Fib and Anticoagulant Therapy

Treatment for stroke prevention in AFThrough interviews and animations explains how atrial fibrillation can cause stroke and why anticoagulation is so important; Discussion of: warfarin (Coumadin), the required monitoring, interactions with food, alcohol and other drugs: newer anticoagulants (NOACs) that do not require regular testing, aren’t affected by foods [but are expensive]. The need for anticoagulation is an important decision to be made with your doctor. On-camera interviews with AF Association CEO, Trudie Lobban MBE and other experts (5:36)  Developed in association with the drug maker, Boehringer Ingelheim.

3. The EKG Signal and Conduction System of the Heart

A-Fib EKG Signal video at A-Fib.com

The EKG signal

Excellent illustration of the heart and a fully labeled graphic of theConduction System of the Heart’. Descriptive text accompanies each step in the animation. Step 2 animates a normally beating heart and shows the electrical signal path. Along side is the corresponding EKG tracing (signal) in perfect sync. The 3rd step shows the same heart but this time in Atrial Fibrillation. Along side is the EKG tracing of the heart in A-Fib with the EKG of a normal heart below it. From the American Heart Association website.

4. About Magnesium Deficiency with Dr. Carolyn Dean

C. Dean, MD

C. Dean, MD

Most A-Fib patients are deficient in Magnesium.The Best Way to Supplement Magnesium with Dr. Carolyn Dean, the author of The Magnesium Miracle. Getting nutrients through food is not always possible; discusses side effects of too much and how you can tell if you have a deficiency. (3:39). See also: Importance of Balancing Calcium & Magnesium“: Why you need to have both in the body; the problem of ‘calcium overload’. (1:00)

5. When Drug Therapy Fails: Why Patients Consider Catheter Ablation

InsiderMedicine.com-When Drug Therapy Fails-Catheter Ablation

Why Patients Consider Catheter Ablation

Dr. Susan M. Sharma discusses why patients with atrial fibrillation turn to ablation when drug therapy doesn’t work. Dr. Sharma presents research findings about the success rate of catherter ablation. Includes transcript of the narration. (3:00 min.) From Insidermedicine.com.

Disclaimer: Videos provided for your convenience only; we make no endorsement of a specific treatment, physician or medical facility.

Visit our A-Fib.com Video Library
for more introductory-level videos

STEVE RYAN VIDEOS:
We’ve edited Steve’s most interesting radio and TV interviews to create several short (3-5 min.) videos. Check out Videos Featuring Steve S. Ryan, PhD, publisher of A-Fib.com.

Call for Guest Writers for Articles, Posts and Editorials: Share Your Insights!

Are you a writer? Are you passionate about a specific A-Fib topic or issue? Why not share your insights with our A-Fib.com readers? Get your byline and photo on our website. We welcome guest writers!

You don’t have to agree with the publisher’s point-of-view. For example, see the editorial by Ken Close, Editorial: A-Fib.com Bias in Coverage of Mini-Maze?

Ken Close, guest writer at A-Fib.com

Ken Close

Author, Lynn Haye, PhD guest writer at A-Fib.com

Lynn Haye,

Examples of articles by other guest writers include Lyn Haye,  Obesity in Young Women Doubles Chances of Developing A-Fib and Frances Koepnick’s “Patient Review: AliveCor Heart Monitor for SmartPhones“.

If you’re interested in being an A-Fib.com guest writer (or just have questions about it), send us an email. Do it NOW!

Like Videos? Browse our A-Fib Library of Videos and Animations

We have loads of A-Fib-related videos in our Video Library. For the reader who learns visually through motion graphics, audio, and personal interviews, these short videos are organized loosely into three levels: introductory/basic, intermediate and in-depth/advanced. Click to browse our video library.

Video with Steve S. Ryan, PhD

Click image to go to video

Steve Ryan Videos: We’ve edited Steve’s most interesting radio and TV interviews to create several short (3-5 min.) videos. Check out Videos Featuring Steve S. Ryan, PhD, publisher of A-Fib.com.

A Popular Video: ‘Buyer Beware of Misleading or Inaccurate A-Fib Information’
Beware of misleading and incorrect A-Fib information published by reputable sources on the internet and in print media. Steve S. Ryan, PhD, gives three specific examples of why you need to be on the lookout for inaccurate statements about Atrial Fibrillation. 3:59 min. Click to Watch video.

My A-Fib Story: The Healing Power of Prayer

Jon - My A-Fib Story at A-Fib.com

by AGL

A-Fib Patient Story #88

My A-Fib Story: The Healing Power of Prayer

By AGL, August 2016

I have been cured of A-Fib since 2011 and simply wanted to share my testimony with you and your readers at A-Fib.com.

A-Fib Medications Didn’t Work

I struggled with A-Fib for almost eight months in the year of 2011. It began in January, and I had episodes of it throughout the year. My episodes weren’t too bad—as in I never had any side effects of the A-Fib like fainting or clotting. The only real thing I had during the episodes was an irregular heartbeat and a fast heart rate.

Being as young as I am and having a family of my own, it was a lot to have on my shoulders.

I wanted the A-Fib gone, and the medication I was taking did not make it go away.

My Pastors Prayed for My Healing

I knew of another way that the A-Fib could go away—by God supernaturally healing me.  Well, in August of 2011 I asked the pastors of my church to pray for me that God would heal me.  After the Sunday service they prayed for me. And a week after that my A-Fib was gone. I was healed by prayer.

I haven’t had an episode or problem since 2011!  It’s a miracle!

Helped by Great Physicians Too

I am not writing this to refute your book, Steve, nor am I saying that the medical field should not be called upon for help in the time of need.

If it wasn’t for the great physicians here where I live on the East Coast, I would be in bad shape—who knows what would have happened if they didn’t break those episodes I had. And, I’ve read testimonies of others where medicine helped them with, if not cured, their A-Fib episodes.

I simply wanted to share with you my experience – since it included A-Fib.  Who knows—maybe God can bless you through my e-mail.

AGL
ayatingl@gmail.com

Editor’s Comments
A-Fib.com's Positive Thought/Prayer group

A-Fib.com’s Positive Thought/Prayer group

At A-Fib.com one of our volunteer groups is a Positive Thought/Prayer group comprised of wonderful people worldwide. If you would like their support, especially at the time of your ablation or surgery, please email us your request. It’s comforting to know that others who’ve had A-Fib care about you and wish you well.

How to Send Your Request: Send your request to our coordinator, Barbara. Write to barbara: babareeba(at)aol.com (substitute an “@” for the “(at)”).

Join our Group: We invite you to join our ‘A-Fib Positive Thought/Prayer’ group. Learn more on our page: The Healing Power of Hope, Belief and Expectations. All are welcome.

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Related Reading:
Anatomy of Hope book cover 350 pix wide at 96 resThe Anatomy of Hope: How People Prevail in the Face of Illness

by Jerome E. Groopman

There’s more to hope than we thought. Hope triggers biochemical changes.

Written by an oncologist and citing actual patient cases (mostly cancer), Dr. Groopman explores the role of hope in fighting disease and healing. Top scientists are interviewed who study the biological link between emotion and biological responses; the most relevant studies are reviewed.

The author shows how hope, belief and expectations can alter the course of our lives, and even of our physical body. HOPE works! (Read Patti’s review on Amazon.com.)

If you find any errors on this page, email us. Last updated: Thursday, December 15, 2016

‘Doctor Health’ Radio: A-Fib Patients & Common Mineral Deficiencies

INTERVIEW: Dr David Snow, host of Doctor Health Radio, talks with Steve S. Ryan, PhD, publisher of A-Fib.com, about magnesium and potassium deficiencies, both common among A-Fib patients; how ‘calcium overload’ can actually bring on Atrial Fibrillation; other supplements to promote a healthy heart; and a few warnings for A-Fib patients.

See our library of videos about Atrial Fibrillation

Video Format: radio interview with lower third graphic titles.
Length: 5:27 min. Click to listen in.

VIDEO LIBRARY: We have loads of A-Fib-related videos in our Video Library. For the reader who learns visually through motion graphics, audio, and personal interviews, these videos are organized loosely into three levels: introductory/basic, intermediate and in-depth/advanced.

See our video library for more videos featuring Steve S. Ryan, PhD.

Videos: Dr. Carolyn Dean Discusses Magnesium Deficiency

Video: Importance of Balancing Calcium & Magnesium Dr. Carolyn Dean.

Video: Importance of Balancing Calcium & Magnesium Dr. Carolyn Dean.

Magnesium information for A-Fib patients. We’ve two videos to our A-Fib Video Library featuring Dr. Carolyn Dean, author of The Magnesium Miracle, talking about magnesium deficiency and calcium overload:

The Best Way to Supplement Magnesium” with Dr. Carolyn Dean. Getting nutrients through food is not always possible; discusses side effects of too much Mg and how you can tell if you have a deficiency.(3:39) Go to video. From iHealthTube.com.

Importance of Balancing Calcium & Magnesium”. Dr. Dean discusses the importance of balancing your intake of magnesium and calcium (2:1); the benefits of both and why you need to have both in the body; the problem of ‘calcium overload’. (2:30) Go to video. From iHealthTube.com.

VIDEO: My Family’s A-Fib was Misdiagnosed for Years

Susan Klein - personal a-fib story at A-Fib.com

Susan Klein A-Fib free

A new video and a new personal A-Fib story. Susan Klein writes that A-Fib runs in her family.

“I come from a long line of people with cardiac rhythm disorders. As I write this, I am 67, female and live in Chicago. At age 42, I realized I hadn’t escaped the family ‘curse’―referred to as “it” or “the mouse running around in my chest.”

Misdiagnosed for Years

Watching my family members suffer with “it”, convinced me that doctors were powerless to stop it. It took me a long time to seek medical advice; and when I first did, I was misdiagnosed.” Continue reading her personal A-Fib story.

Includes a video featuring Susan talking about her ablation using the FIRM mapping system pioneered by her Stanford cardiologist, Dr. Sanjiv Narayan.

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