Cardioversion

New Story: Cardiologists Offer Little A-Fib Advice to Fellow Doctor

John Bennett, MD, practices emergency medicine in Miami, Florida. Dr. Bennett is known for his series of Google Hangouts live videos featuring experts in a variety of medical fields. To learn more, visit his website, Internetmedicine.com, “Where the Internet Meet Medicine.” His Atrial Fibrillation started at age 57.

John Bennett MD personal A-Fib story at A-Fib.com

John Bennett MD

“As a physician, I had the usual knowledge most physicians have about A Fib—which is not much. Especially the care of chronic Atrial Fibrillation. Like most people, I trusted my cardiologist to do the best thing for me.

First Cardiologist No Options But Drugs—I Hated Coumadin

My first cardiologist did the usual workup, and prescribed Coumadin. I hated that medicine. Made me feel tired, no energy, but I accepted it.

Finally, I got tired of being tired, so I started to do some online research.

I found out that you could elect to be cardioverted, which my first cardiologist did not even mention (since, of course, he would lose me as a patient, if I returned to normal sinus rhythm).

Electrocardioversion Works for 7 Years

I then went straight to an Electrophysiologist (EP), who converted me, and it lasted 7 years. Then last year…” Continue reading Dr. John Bennett’s story->

Staying in A-Fib Reduces Brain Volume & Cognitive Function

A study of brain atrophy from Iceland found that A-Fib in the elderly caused accelerated loses of brain volume and cognitive function.

Study of brain volume and cognitive function in A-Fib patients

Study of brain volume and cognitive function in A-Fib patients

This is yet another study driving a stake into the heart of the notion that you can just leave patients in A-Fib with anticoagulants and rate control drugs, and they will live happily ever after.

“It’s better for the brain to remain in sinus rhythm than to pursue rate control of A-Fib” stated Dr. David O. Arnar, speaking of the AGES-Reykjavik Study results at the 2015 Euro Society of Cardiology Annual Congress.

The AGES-Reykjavik Study

Over two thousand elderly subjects without dementia (mean age 67 years old) were tested and followed for over 5 years. Participants had brain MRIs and structured cognitive function testing during the duration of the study.

The 2,472 elderly patients fell into three groups: those who remained A-Fib-free throughout the study, those with confirmed A-Fib at the start (121), and those who developed new-onset A-Fib (132) by the end of the study.

AGES Findings: Brain Matter

At the end of the follow-up period, all participants had a reduction in brain grey matter. The amount of reduction varied significantly by group:

• A-Fib-free: 1.8% decrease
• Ongoing A-Fib: 2.79% decrease
• New-onset A-Fib: 6.5% decrease

… Continue reading this report…->

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