"This book is incredibly complete and easy-to-understand for anybody. I certainly recommend it for patients who want to know more about atrial fibrillation than what they will learn from doctors...."

Pierre Jaïs, M.D. Professor of Cardiology, Haut-Lévêque Hospital, Bordeaux, France

"Dear Steve, I saw a patient this morning with your book [in hand] and highlights throughout. She loves it and finds it very useful to help her in dealing with atrial fibrillation."

Dr. Wilber Su Cavanaugh Heart Center, Phoenix, AZ

"Your book [Beat Your A-Fib] is the quintessential most important guide not only for the individual experiencing atrial fibrillation and his family, but also for primary physicians, and cardiologists."

Jane-Alexandra Krehbiel, nurse, blogger and author "Rational Preparedness: A Primer to Preparedness"


"Steve Ryan's summaries of the Boston A-Fib Symposium are terrific. Steve has the ability to synthesize and communicate accurately in clear and simple terms the essence of complex subjects. This is an exceptional skill and a great service to patients with atrial fibrillation."

Dr. Jeremy Ruskin of Mass. General Hospital and Harvard Medical School

"I love your [A-fib.com] website, Patti and Steve! An excellent resource for anybody seeking credible science on atrial fibrillation plus compelling real-life stories from others living with A-Fib. Congratulations…"

Carolyn Thomas, blogger and heart attack survivor; MyHeartSisters.org

"Steve, your website was so helpful. Thank you! After two ablations I am now A-fib free. You are a great help to a lot of people, keep up the good work."

Terry Traver, former A-Fib patient

"If you want to do some research on AF go to A-Fib.com by Steve Ryan, this site was a big help to me, and helped me be free of AF."

Roy Salmon Patient, A-Fib Free; pacemakerclub.com, Sept. 2013

 FAQs Coping with A-Fib: Circulation

FAQs A-Fib afib19. “I am in Chronic (all-the-time) A-Fib. I feel tired and a little light-headed, probably because my atria aren’t pumping properly. Is there any way I can improve my circulation, without having to undergo a Catheter Ablation (poor success rate and risky at my age) or Surgery (even more risky)?”

In theory, yes. In Chronic A-Fib it’s not unusual to feel tired and light-headed. Your atria are fibrillating instead of pumping blood into the ventricles. Blood flow to your brain and other organs is reduced by about 15%-30%. But your ventricles still function by suctioning blood from the atria much like a turkey baster sucks up liquid.

To some extent, you can improve the strength and capacity of your ventricles by exercise, such as by walking on a treadmill or at the shopping mall.

You can also improve the oxygen saturation of your blood by using an Oxygen Concentrator ($500-$1,000). While on a treadmill, for example, you can breath in concentrated oxygen through a cannula, a flexible tube you insert into your nostrils. You can measure how much oxygen is in your blood by using an pulse oximeter ($50). The desired range is 95-100% oxygen saturation. (Some athletes with good circulation use this technique to improve their athletic performance.)

Don’t dismiss the treatment options of catheter ablation or mini-maze surgery. Both have high success rates with low rates of complication. With Chronic A-Fib, the longer you wait to cure your A-Fib, the harder it gets.

Be cautious: While improved circulation is good for your overall health, don’t over do the exercising. It could be counterproductive. With Chronic A-Fib your heart is already working harder than a normal healthy heart. Adding even more demand can lead to more enlargement and remodeling.

The Bottom Line: the real question is whether these techniques will improve your A-Fib symptoms of feeling tired and light-headed. I’m unaware of any studies demonstrating the effectiveness of the above techniques for the symptoms of Chronic A-Fib.

¤  The Link Between Infections and Inflammation in Heart Disease. Life Extension Vitamins. Last accessed November 5, 2012   http://www.lifeextensionvitamins.com/cadico6otco.html

¤  Atrial Flutter. Heart Rhythm Society website. Last accessed March 30, 2014. URL: http://www.hrsonline.org/Patient-Resources/Heart-Diseases-Disorders/Atrial-Flutter

¤  “Atrial Fibrillation Educational Material” University of Pennsylvania. 2002, p. 3.[/su_pullquote]

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