FREE Report: How & Why to Read An Operating Room Report

Special 12-page report by Steve S. Ryan, PhD

New FREE 12-page report by Steve S. Ryan

In our new FREE 12-page Report, How & Why to Read Your Operating Room Report, we examine the actual O.R. report of the catheter ablation of Travis Van Slooten, publisher of Living With Atrial Fibrillation performed by Dr. Andrea Natale, Austin, TX.

What is an O.R. Report?

An O.R. report is written by the electrophysiologist who performed the catheter ablation. It contains a detailed account of the findings, the procedure used, the preoperative and postoperative diagnoses, etc.

It’s a very technical document. Because of this, it’s usually given to a patient only when they ask for it.

New Report: How & Why to Read Your Operating Room Report

In our new FREE 12-page Report: How & Why to Read Your Operating Room Report, I make it easy (well, let’s say ‘easier’) to learn how to read an O.R. report.

Along with an introduction, I’ve annotated every technical phrase or concept so you will understand each entry. I then translate what each comment means and summarize Travis’ report.

Read more at: Special Report How & Why to Read Your Operating Room Report

Tip: If you’ve had an ablation, ask for your O.R. Report. If you or a loved one is planning a catheter ablation, make a note to yourself to ask for the O.R. report.

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