ABOUT 'BEAT YOUR A-FIB'...


"This book is incredibly complete and easy-to-understand for anybody. I certainly recommend it for patients who want to know more about atrial fibrillation than what they will learn from doctors...."

Pierre Jaïs, M.D. Professor of Cardiology, Haut-Lévêque Hospital, Bordeaux, France

"Dear Steve, I saw a patient this morning with your book [in hand] and highlights throughout. She loves it and finds it very useful to help her in dealing with atrial fibrillation."

Dr. Wilber Su Cavanaugh Heart Center, Phoenix, AZ

"Your book [Beat Your A-Fib] is the quintessential most important guide not only for the individual experiencing atrial fibrillation and his family, but also for primary physicians, and cardiologists."

Jane-Alexandra Krehbiel, nurse, blogger and author "Rational Preparedness: A Primer to Preparedness"



ABOUT A-FIB.COM...


"Steve Ryan's summaries of the Boston A-Fib Symposium are terrific. Steve has the ability to synthesize and communicate accurately in clear and simple terms the essence of complex subjects. This is an exceptional skill and a great service to patients with atrial fibrillation."

Dr. Jeremy Ruskin of Mass. General Hospital and Harvard Medical School

"I love your [A-fib.com] website, Patti and Steve! An excellent resource for anybody seeking credible science on atrial fibrillation plus compelling real-life stories from others living with A-Fib. Congratulations…"

Carolyn Thomas, blogger and heart attack survivor; MyHeartSisters.org

"Steve, your website was so helpful. Thank you! After two ablations I am now A-fib free. You are a great help to a lot of people, keep up the good work."

Terry Traver, former A-Fib patient

"If you want to do some research on AF go to A-Fib.com by Steve Ryan, this site was a big help to me, and helped me be free of AF."

Roy Salmon Patient, A-Fib Free; pacemakerclub.com, Sept. 2013


FAQ: After Ablation—What’s my Chance of Staying A-Fib Free?

There is a tendency for ablated heart tissue to heal itself, regrow the ablated tissue, reconnect, and start producing A-Fib signals again. But if this happens, it usually occurs within the first three to six months of the initial PVA(I).

An A-Fib.com reader sent me this question about recurrence of his A-Fib after a successful ablation:

Illustration of catheter ablation

Illustration of catheter ablation of pulmonary vein

“Since my PVI, I have been A-Fib free with no symptoms for 32 months. What do you think my chances of staying A-Fib free are?”

Regrowth/Reconnection of Ablated Heart Tissue

I think your chances of staying A-Fib free are pretty good.

If your Pulmonary Veins (PV) are well isolated and stay that way, you can’t get A-Fib there again. When the PVs are isolated and disconnected and haven’t reconnected, it seems to be permanent. But it’s too early in the history of PVA(I)s to say this definitively. …read the rest of my answer.

In Persistent A-Fib? Time Matters: Ablate Sooner for Better Outcomes

Note: This research study is important if you have Persistent A-Fib or your Paroxysmal A-Fib has progressed to Persistent A-Fib.

The Cost of Waiting to Ablate

In patients with persistent atrial fibrillation undergoing ablation, the time interval between the first diagnosis of persistent A-Fib and the catheter ablation procedure had a strong association with the ablation outcomes.

Cleveland Clinic researchers found that shorter diagnosis-to-ablation time spans were associated with better outcomes. Longer diagnosis-to-ablation times was associated with a greater degree of atrial remodeling.

When A-Fib becomes persistent A-Fib, the ‘first diagnosis-to-ablation time span’ had a stronger impact on outcomes than the time spent in paroxysmal A-Fib.

According to electrophysiologist Dr. Oussama Wazni, “once the diagnosis of atrial fibrillation is made, it’s important not to spend too much time trying to keep a patient in normal rhythm with medical [drug] therapy” before referring for radio-frequency ablation.” Dr. Wazni is Co-Director of the Center for Atrial Fibrillation at the Cleveland Clinic.

His comments are based on the published analysis of two-year outcomes among 1,241 consecutive patients undergoing first-time ablation of persistent atrial fibrillation over an eight-year period at Cleveland Clinic. All patients had successful isolation of all 4 PVs (pulmonary veins), and the superior vena cava was isolated in 69.6%. In addition, Left Atrium ablations (including complex fractionated electrograms) were performed in 65.6% of patients.

First Diagnosis-to-Ablation Time Span: The Shorter the Better

Importantly, the first diagnosis -to-ablation time interval (of persistent A-Fib) had a stronger impact on outcomes than the time spent with a paroxysmal A-Fib diagnosis or the duration of continuous A-Fib before the ablation procedure.

These findings suggest that A-Fib is a disease with a continuous spectrum…
The findings suggest that A-Fib is a disease with a continuous spectrum, with patients at the extreme end of that spectrum having higher arrhythmia recurrence rates after catheter ablation, whereas patients with shorter diagnosis-to-ablation times having lower recurrence rates.

The analysis was published in the Jan. 2016 issue of Circulation: Arrhythmia and Electrophysiology. (Read online or download as a PDF.)

VIDEO: Ablation for Persistent Atrial Fibrillation.  In this short video, Dr. Wazni describes the results of research showing that time interval between first diagnosis of persistent atrial fibrillation and catheter ablation had a strong association with ablation outcomes. (Posted by the Cleveland Clinic, Jan 2016; 3:11 min)

Reference for this Article

A-Fib.com Glossary of Terms and Phrases: Recent Additions

Recent additions to our A-Fib.com Glossary of Medical Terms and Phrases:A-Fib.com Glossary of Terms on notepad

Heart Failure:
A “failed” heart is NOT one that has suddenly stopped. Instead, it occurs when the heart is unable to pump enough blood to the other organs to satisfy their need for oxygen and nutrients. It usually manifests as tiredness and weakness, breathlessness and swelling of the legs and abdomen.

Atrial Kick:
The force or strength of the atrial contraction (which forces blood into the ventricles).

Fibrosis:
Fiber-like characteristics that develop in place of the normal smooth walls of the heart making you more vulnerable to A‑Fib…Over time it makes the heart stiff, less flexible and weak, overworks the heart, reduces pumping efficiency and leads to other heart problems…read the entire definition

Check it out. Bookmark it! Refer to it often!

The A-Fib.com Glossary of Medical Terms and Phrases is the most complete online glossary devoted exclusively to Atrial Fibrillation. Each definition is written in everyday language—a great resource for patients and their families.

(See Glossary of Terms in the left menu.) If you don’t find the term you are looking for—email us and we’ll add it to our Glossary.

2017 AF Symposium: FIRM Rotor Mapping System During Live Ablation

Dr David Wilber Loyola University

D. Wilber

In a live case from the 2017 AF Symposium, Dr. David Wilber from Loyola University Medical Center showed how he uses the Topera FIRM rotor mapping system to identify rotors in conjunction with a PVI. (‘FIRM’ stands for Focal Impulse and Rotor Modulation.)

Dr. Wilber described how he first does voltage mapping while the patient is in normal sinus rhythm. He started in the right atrium, then moved to the left; he used the FIRM system to map where rotors were coming from. (In patients with persistent A-Fib, he typically finds as many as 4-8 rotors.) He mapped and ablated until there were no more rotors.

Only after using the FIRM system did he do a Pulmonary Vein ablation…Continue reading my report.

NOAC or Warfarin for Valvular A-Fib?

Patients with ‘Valvular Atrial Fibrillation’ are often restricted from most A-Fib clinical studies and research. In particular, for NOAC trials, people with Valvular A-Fib have generally been excluded because they may have a higher rate of forming clots (e.g.: left atrial clots). 

“Valvular Atrial Fibrillation” refers to those A-Fib patients with artificial heart valves or mitral stenosis.

Like most A-Fib patients, Valvular A-Fib patients with bioprosthetic or mechanical valves have to be on an anticoagulant which up to now was restricted to warfarin. So, are the new NOACs an option?

Bioprosthetic valves are non-synthetic (usually porcine) devices used to replace a defective heart valve. Compared to mechanical valves, bioprosthetic valves are less likely to cause clots, but are more prone to structural degeneration (35% fail within 15 years).

Warfarin vs Edoxaban (NOAC)

A 2017 study showed that the Novel Oral Anticoagulant (NOAC) edoxaban (brand name: Savaysa) was safer than warfarin in preventing an A-Fib stroke in people with bioprosthetic heart valves.

Edoxaban 30 and 60 mg (Savaysa)

Edoxaban works by inhibiting factor Xa in the coagulation process. The lower dose (30 mg) was associated with a reduced rate of major bleeding, but not the higher dose (60 mg).

Compared to warfarin, edoxaban was associated with lower annual stroke rates, systemic embolic events, major bleeds, and deaths annually.

“Our analysis suggests that edoxaban appears to be a reasonable alternative to warfarin in patients with Afib and remote bioprosthetic valve implantation,” according to Dr. Robert P. Giugliano of Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, MA.

Edoxaban Works With Bioprosthetic Valves But Not Mechanical Ones

For the first time, research indicates that a NOAC (edoxaban) can be used for Valvular A-Fib to prevent an A-Fib stroke―but only in the case of bioprosthetic (porcine) valves.

The NOAC, Edoxaban (Savaysa), was safer than warfarin for A-Fib patients with bioprosthetic valves.

With regards to mechanical valves, the authors cited a study in which dabigatran (Pradaxa) fared poorly in mechanical valves.

What About Other Factor Xa NOACs?

What about the other ‘factor Xa inhibitors’ such as Xarelto and Eliquis? Can they be used like edoxaban? Currently there is little clinical data on this subject. But since all three are factor Xa inhibitors, most likely they will be proven to be effective in A-Fib patients with bioprosthetic valves.

What Patients Need to Know

Do you have Valvular A-Fib and a bioprosthetic valve? Are you on warfarin? If being on warfarin is difficult for you, you now have a choice of anticoagulant. Ask your doctor about switching to the NOAC, edoxaban.

Reference for this Article

2017 AF Symposium: Preventing Esophageal Fistula

Report 14 from the 2017 AF Symposium summarizes a live ablation using a new tool to protect the esophagus.

The Problem: During an ablation, doctors take great precautions to not heat or injure the esophagus which lies behind the posterior wall of the left atrium. Injuring the esophagus can, in very rare cases, cause an atrial esophageal fistula which can be fatal.

Fear of causing esophageal injury can cause the EP to modify the ablation lesion set delivery, thereby reducing ablation success.

New Solution: an Esophagus displacement tool.

Use of the esophagus displacement tool, EsoSure Esophageal Retractor

The EsoSure Esophageal Retractor allows doctors to re-position a section of the esophagus away from the nearby heart tissue and avoid the heat generated during ablation.

Live streaming ablation: In this re-do ablation, entrainment (pacing) mapping was used to identify non-PV triggers.

Since they had to ablate in the posterior of the left atrium next to the esophagus, they simply moved the EsoSure Retractor up and down to displace the esophagus. The EPs remarked they could now ablate at a higher wattage without fear of harming the esophagus. …continuing reading my report…

Steve’s A-Fib Alerts: March 2017 Issue is Out

Check your email boxes! Our A-Fib Alerts: March 2017 issue is out and being read around the world. Read the current issue of A-Fib Alerts online or learn more about our newsletter.

Beat Your A-Fib book at A-Fib.com

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2017 AF Symposium LIVE VIDEO: Can Adding Fibrosis Improve Ablation Success?

Updated March 9: We added two new slides comparing the patient’s initial and subsequent DE-MRI images.

Report 13 from 2107 AF Symposium: In a live ablation from from Mass. General Hospital in Boston, Drs. Heist and Van Houzen demonstrated a pioneering strategy to treat Atrial Fibrillation patients with patchy fibrotic areas of tissue. This tissue perpetuates A-Fib.

First, a DE-MRI scan defines and measures the heart’s areas of fibrosis. Next, the doctors ablated (or filled in) these patchy areas with more fibrosis (i.e., ablation scarring) turning the patchy areas into dense fibrotic areas. Transforming patchy fibrotic tissue to dense fibrotic tissue stops A-Fib signals from perpetuating in that tissue.

It may seem counter-intuitive―create more fibrosis to make patients A-Fib free. Read more about this innovative strategy.

A-Fib.com HON Certified for 8th Year: ‘Health Information You Can Trust’

Once again, A-Fib.com has earned the Health On the Net Foundation (HON) Certification for quality and trustworthiness of medical and health online information. The Health On the Net Foundation (HON) Code of Conduct helps protect citizens from misleading health information.

The voluntary HONcode accreditation program sets out a standardized criterion of eight principles of good practice for health information web sites. Each applicant is checked for compliance by a review committee including medical professionals.

Our 2017-2018 Active Certification & Dynamic Seal

The A-Fib.com HON seal is displayed in the footer of our web page and is directly linked to the A-Fib.com HONcode certificate located on the HON website.

HON Certified: Websites You Can Trust

When browsing healthcare sites on the web, look for the HON Code certificate. Learn more at Health On the Net Foundation (HON) Certification.

High-Quality Illustration of the Heart’s Electrical System

The Heart's Electrical System Illustration

The Heart’s Electrical System: Click image to download

Update March 24: The Cleveland Clinic has given us permission to host this graphic on A-Fib.com for the viewing and printing by our readers.

Print and keep this illustration handy for the next time you talk with your doctor about the workings of your heart. You can make notes directly on the picture.

Download the PDF file and store on your hard-drive. To have one handy when you need it, print and store copies in your “A-Fib Binder or folder“.
A-Fib.com Library of videos and animations

Video: You may also want to watch the video, How Your Heart Works and Understanding Arrhythmias, or one of several heart animations from our A-Fib.com Video & Animations Library.

Also see our Free Offers and Downloads page.

2017 AF Symposium: LIVE Video Ablation With Non-Contact Catheter Mapping

The Acutus Medical Non-Contact basket catheter with multiple electrodes

The Acutus Medical Non-Contact basket catheter with multiple electrodes

Report 12 from 2107 AF Symposium: In a live case from Prague, the Czech Republic, the EPs used the non-contact basket catheter to generate a 3D anatomy of the patient’s left atrium.

They produced propagation maps which looked like rotor action seen in other mapping systems, but sharper and with high resolution.

During the ablation, they used Acutus Medical’s basket catheter to re-map the left atrium. This showed that there were gaps in the ablation of one of the right vein openings which they corrected. …Read my full report…

Atrial Fibrillation and Atrial Flutter: Cause and Effect?

About Atrial Fibrillation and Atrial Flutter…are they linked? Does one precede the other? Can one procedure fix both? Can a typical catheter ablation fix both Atrial Fibrillation and Atrial Flutter at the same time? Can Maze surgery or Mini-maze surgery fix both?

Surgery vs. Ablation

In general, Atrial Flutter originates in the right atrium and Atrial Fibrillation in the left atrium.

Maze/Mini-maze surgical approaches typically don’t access the right atrium, and therefore can’t fix A-Flutter.

Maze/Mini-maze surgical approaches typically don’t access the right atrium, and therefore can’t fix A-Flutter. If you have both A-Fib and A-Flutter, a Maze procedure needs to be followed by a catheter ablation to fix the Atrial Flutter.

A catheter ablation procedure for A-Flutter is relatively easy and it’s highly successful (95%). It usually involves making a single line in the right atrium which blocks the A-Flutter (Caviotricuspid Isthmus line).

A Catheter Ablation Two-Fer? 

If you are having a catheter ablation, many doctors make this Caviotricuspid Isthmus ablation line while doing an A-Fib ablation (in the left atrium)—even if you don’t have A-Flutter at the time.

Catheter inserted into the heart and through septum wall into Left Atria

Catheter inserted into the heart and through septum wall into Left Atria

Catheters enter the heart through the right atrium. At the beginning of a catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation, doctors enter the heart through the right atrium. While there they may elect to make the right atrium ablation line at this point which takes 10-20 minutes.

They then go through the wall separating the right and left atria (transseptal wall) to do the ablation for A-Fib in the left atrium. (Some doctors chose to place the right atrium ablation line at the end of an ablation when they withdraw from the left atrium into the right atrium.)

Some say one should “do no harm” and not make this right atrium ablation line if there is no A-Flutter. Saying it can always be done later in another catheter ablation at little risk to the patient.

Research: Are A-Fib and A-Flutter Linked?

While you can have A-Flutter without A-Fib, more often than not, they are linked. When you have A-Flutter, A-Fib often lurks in the background or develops later.

Patients did much better if they had an ablation for both A-Fib and a A-Flutter at the same time even though they appeared to only have A-Flutter.

Some A-Flutter may originate in the left atrium, or the A-Flutter may mask A-Fib which may appear later after a successful A-Flutter ablation.

As many as half of all patients ablated for A-Flutter may later develop A-Fib.

In a small research study, patients did much better if they had an ablation for both A-Fib and a A-Flutter at the same time even though they appeared to only have A-Flutter.

What Patients Need to Know

But right now we can’t say for sure if one causes the other. We do know that A-Flutter usually comes from the right atrium, while A-Fib usually comes from the left atrium.

Resources for this article

New Research into Alcohol & A-Fib: How Many Drinks are Too Many?

“While moderate amounts of alcohol appear protective for the ‘plumbing,’ or blood supply to the heart muscle, the benefits of alcohol do not extend to the electrical parts of the heart, or heartbeat.”

Over time, drinking may actually change the electrical signals, triggering irregular heartbeat (arrhythmias).

“The benefits of alcohol do not extend to the electrical parts of the heart.”

Risk per Daily Alcohol Drink

A new study found the risk of atrial fibrillation grew by 8 percent for each daily alcoholic drink. The findings were similar for men and women. The authors looked at previous studies that tracked almost 900,000 people over 12 years.

Fibrosis: The study doesn’t establish a direct cause-and-effect relationship. Nevertheless, “cell damage from habitual drinking may lead to small amounts of fibrous tissue within the heart that causes the irregular, quivering heartbeat”, the study authors said.

Post-catheter ablation: The review found that people who continue to drink are more likely to have ongoing irregular heartbeats even after catheter ablation.

Weekly recommendation: “..No more than one alcoholic drink per day with two alcohol-free days a week.”

Weekly Alcohol Recommendation

Dr. Pater Kistler recommended that those with irregular heartbeat “should probably drink no more than one alcoholic drink per day with two alcohol-free days a week.”

He added they had no randomized data that tells what a ‘safe’ amount is to consume. The study authors called for more research to determine whether avoiding alcohol completely is required for patients who have irregular heartbeats.

Know Your Triggers

Some Atrial Fibrillation patients have sworn off alcohol altogether. Through trial and error, they’ve found that any amount of alcohol contributes to or triggers their A-Fib episodes.

Dr. Kistler’s research is helpful for the balance of A-Fib patients. It offers some research-based guidelines to minimize the impact of alcohol consumption on their A-Fib.

For additional reading, see my article:Holiday Heart”: Binging Alcohol, Marijuana & Rich Foods.

Resources for this article

New FAQ: Do Ablations Only Treat A-Fib Symptoms and Not a “Cure”?

We’ve posted a new FAQ and answer about curing Atrial Fibrillation with catheter ablation versus successful drug therapy:

Q: “I’ve read that an ablation only treats A-Fib symptoms, that it isn’t a “cure.” If I take meds like flecainide which stop all A-Fib symptoms and have no significant side effects, isn’t that a ‘cure?’”

My answer: A successful catheter ablation doesn’t just treat A-Fib symptoms, it physically changes your heart.

Isolates PVs: An ablation closes off the openings around your pulmonary veins (PVs) so A-Fib signals from the Pulmonary Veins (PVs) can no longer get into your heart.

It electrically ‘isolates’ your PVs, and if successful and permanent, you should be protected from developing A-Fib that originates from your PVs (where most A-Fib originates).

Recurrence Rates: Older research showed that recurrence of A-Fib after an ablation occurred at a 7% rate out to five years. But this was before the use of the newer techniques of Contact Force Sensing catheters and CryoBalloon ablation which make more permanent lesion lines around your Pulmonary Veins.

Also, people with comorbidities, like sleep apnea…continue reading my answer…

2017 AF Symposium: Three New Reports—Genetic A-Fib and LIVE Streaming Video Ablations

Live Streaming Video from AF Symposium at A-Fib.com

To my 2017 AF Symposium Overview, I added how we observed in-progress A-Fib procedures via streaming video from five locations spanning the globe, and heard from the EPs performing the ablations. Continue to the Video Overview…

Report 11: LIVE! Ablation Using CardioFocus Laser Balloon

CardioFocus HeartLight Laser Balloon catheter

CardioFocus HeartLight Laser Balloon catheter

Video streaming from Na Homolce Hospital in Prague, The Czech Republic. Drs. Peter Neuzil, Jan Petru and Jan Skoda did an ablation using the CardioFocus HeartLight Endoscopic Visually Guided Laser Balloon (FDA approved April 4, 2016).

The doctors showed how they could directly see the Pulmonary Vein opening they were ablating (unlike RF and CryoBalloon systems). The center of the catheter has an endoscopic (looking inside) camera.

(To me, this is a major advantage and ground-breaking improvement for patients.)

Read more of my report, and see a short video clip with an actual view of the pulmonary veins during an ablation. …Continue reading my report….

Report 10: LIVE! Two Procedures—but Different Left Atrial Appendage Occlusion Devices

Featuring the Amplatz Amulet from St. Jude Medical and the LAmbre from LifeTech Scientific.

Amplatz Amulet occlusion device by St. Jude Medical - A-Fib.com

Amplatz Amulet occlusion device by St. Jude Medical

Live from Milan, we watched the doctors insert an Amplatz Amulet into the LAA of a 78-year-old women who had a high risk of bleeding.

These doctors did something I had never seen before. They made a physical model of the woman’s LAA, then showed how the Amplatz Amulet fit into the model. This helped AF Symposium attendees see how the Amplatz Amulet actually worked. …Continue reading my report…

Report 9: World-Wide Studies on Genetic A-Fib

DNA: Double helix graphic at A-Fib.com

Dr. Patrick Ellinor of Mass. General Hospital, Boston MA, reported the biggest news is that A-Fib genetic research is increasing exponentially. The AFGen Consortium website lists 37 different studies and world-wide institutions studying A-Fib genetics with over 70,000 cases. Within the next 10 years, Dr. Ellinor and his colleagues hope to identify over 100 different genetic loci for A-Fib.

Dr. Ellinor reported that using a genetic “fingerprint” of A-Fib helps to identify those patients at the greatest risk of a stroke. (There’s a 40% increased risk of developing A-Fib if a relative has it.)…Continue reading my report…

About the Annual AF Symposium

The annual AF Symposium brings together the world’s leading medical scientists, researchers and EPs to share recent advances in the treatment of atrial fibrillation. You can read all my summary reports on my 2017 AF Symposium page.

Steve’s A-Fib Alerts: February 2017 Issue is Out

Check your email boxes! Our A-Fib Alerts: February 2017 issue is out and being read around the world.

Get up to 50% discount on 'Beat Your A-Fib' by Steve S. Ryan, PhD at A-Fib.com

Get up to 50% discount on my book.

Not a subscriber yet?  Sign-up TODAY! A-Fib Alerts is the easy way to get your A-Fib news. It’s in a quick, easy-to-scan format. Get your A-Fib news delivered direct to your email box. (There’s No Risk! You can unsubscribe at any time.) Subscribe NOW.

Read the current issue of A-Fib Alerts or learn more about our newsletter.

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My Atrial Fibrillation Story: I was Told to “Just Live with It.”

Roger Finnern from Tempe, AZ, wrote to share his journey back to normal sinus rhythm (NSR) after 4 years in chronic asymptomatic Atrial Fibrillation. He writes about being on amiodarone, how he did a sleep apnea study (at home), and used acupuncture to help reduce his A-Fib symptoms:

Roger Finnern

Steve, I contacted you last in December 2015 as I was in chronic A-Fib without symptoms, age 67, and had a cardiologist who wanted me to do nothing but take a low dose aspirin and live with it.
After two years of being in Chronic A-Fib, I went out on my own. With your recommendation, I contacted Dr. Vijay Swarup, Arizona Heart Rhythm Center. I ended up getting a RF ablation in early February 2016.

After Ablation, Back in A-Fib after 2 days

After my ablation, I was in rhythm only 2 days before it reverted. They performed cardioversion twice before releasing me from the hospital, and each worked only for a minute before reverting back.
Dr. Swarup was a bit miffed as he had tested all ablated points and could not produce any response back to A-fib. He said something to the effect that my heart was highly irritated. They put me on the antiarrhythmic drug amiodarone to convert at home.

Amiodarone image

Amiodarone Works—finally A Normal EKG!

The amiodarone worked, and one week later I saw my doctor and had my first normal EKG since 2013! On August 2, six months post-ablation, I was taken off amiodarone. (I was kept on amiodarone longer than normal, due to the rough time we had getting into rhythm initially.) …Continue reading Roger’s story…

2017 AF Symposium More Reports: Obesity & A-Fib and Increasing Fibrosis

Another two summary reports from the January 2017 AF Symposium. Here’s the entire list of my reports from the 2017 AF Symposium.

Report 7: A-Fib Increases Fibrosis by 5%-10% Per Year

Dr. Nassir Marrouche of the University of Utah (CARMA), Salt Lake City, UT continued his ground-breaking work using MRI to investigate Atrial Fibrillation. Some of the major contributions Dr. Marrouche’s MRI research has made include that patients with high fibrosis levels are at greater risk of stroke and that they may be precluded from a successful catheter ablation.

He showed how current MRI testing also measures fibrosis in 3D to better gauge its thickness. Read about his latest research on A-Fib patients and fibrosis.

Report 8: New Insights into the Effects of Obesity on Atrial Fibrillation

Dr. Jose Jalife of the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, discussed the “Obesity Paradox”, a hypothesis that obesity may be protective and associated with greater survival with certain chronic diseases. Dr. Jalfie showed how and why this is not the case with A-Fib.

Under normal conditions, the surface of the heart is covered by fat stored in the tissue. A-Fib is often associated with increased volume of epicardial fat… Continue reading Dr. Jalife’s research findings.

See the entire list of my reports from the 2017 AF Symposium.
Look for another report soon.

New Video Added to A-Fib Library

We’ve add a video to our library of Atrial Fibrillation videos:

Mechanism and effects of Atrial Fibrillation

An Impulse That’s Lost its Way

A medical description of the mechanism and effects of Atrial Fibrillation (i.e., initiating triggers, abnormal substrate, electrical and structural remodeling, blood stasis and hypercoagulable state, etc.). Animation with narration.

Difficulty level: Intermediate. 3:24 min. Watch video.

A-Fib.com Library of Videos and Animations

We have loads of A-Fib-related videos in our Video Library. For the reader who learns visually through motion graphics, audio, and personal interviews, these short videos are organized loosely into three levels: introductory/basic, intermediate and in-depth/advanced. Click to browse our video library.

Click image to go to video.

A Popular Video: Buyer Beware of Misleading or Inaccurate A-Fib Information’, with Steve Ryan and host, Skip E. Lowe. Click image to go to video.

Steve Ryan Videos: We’ve edited Steve’s most interesting radio and TV interviews to create several short (3-5 min.) videos. Check out Videos Featuring Steve S. Ryan, PhD, publisher of A-Fib.com.

3:59 min. Click to Watch video.

New Research on NOACs: Which has More Bleeding Risk―Which is Safer?

Do you take the anticoagulant, Xarelto? Or one of the newer NOACs? Which is safest? Which has the least GI bleeding?

NOACs Research Study Results

The New NOACs - anticoagulants graphic at A-Fib.com

Which is safer?

A Mayo Clinic study indicated that the risk of gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is higher for patients taking Xarelto than for other anticoagulants in its class.

The researchers compared the gastrointestinal (GI) safety profile of three rival oral anticoagulants: Xarelto (rivaroxaban), Pradaxa (dabigatran) and Eliquis (apixaban). All of the patients in the study had Atrial Fibrillation.

Bleeding occurrence: GI bleeding occurred more frequently in patients taking Xarelto compared to Pradaxa (approximately 20% increased risk), while Eliquis had the lowest GI bleeding risk.

Age factor: They also found that the risk of GI bleeds increased with age. In particular, patients over the age of 75 were at an increased risk.

Safety: Eliquis had the most favorable GI safety profile, even among very elderly patients, and Xarelto had the least favorable. … Continue reading this report…->

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