ABOUT 'BEAT YOUR A-FIB'...


"This book is incredibly complete and easy-to-understand for anybody. I certainly recommend it for patients who want to know more about atrial fibrillation than what they will learn from doctors...."

Pierre Jaïs, M.D. Professor of Cardiology, Haut-Lévêque Hospital, Bordeaux, France

"Dear Steve, I saw a patient this morning with your book [in hand] and highlights throughout. She loves it and finds it very useful to help her in dealing with atrial fibrillation."

Dr. Wilber Su Cavanaugh Heart Center, Phoenix, AZ

"Your book [Beat Your A-Fib] is the quintessential most important guide not only for the individual experiencing atrial fibrillation and his family, but also for primary physicians, and cardiologists."

Jane-Alexandra Krehbiel, nurse, blogger and author "Rational Preparedness: A Primer to Preparedness"



ABOUT A-FIB.COM...


"Steve Ryan's summaries of the Boston A-Fib Symposium are terrific. Steve has the ability to synthesize and communicate accurately in clear and simple terms the essence of complex subjects. This is an exceptional skill and a great service to patients with atrial fibrillation."

Dr. Jeremy Ruskin of Mass. General Hospital and Harvard Medical School

"I love your [A-fib.com] website, Patti and Steve! An excellent resource for anybody seeking credible science on atrial fibrillation plus compelling real-life stories from others living with A-Fib. Congratulations…"

Carolyn Thomas, blogger and heart attack survivor; MyHeartSisters.org

"Steve, your website was so helpful. Thank you! After two ablations I am now A-fib free. You are a great help to a lot of people, keep up the good work."

Terry Traver, former A-Fib patient

"If you want to do some research on AF go to A-Fib.com by Steve Ryan, this site was a big help to me, and helped me be free of AF."

Roy Salmon Patient, A-Fib Free; pacemakerclub.com, Sept. 2013


Natural Therapies

FAQs Natural Therapies: A-Fib Free with Naturopathic Support

 FAQs Natural Therapies: A-Fib Free with Naturopathy

Complementary & Natural Therapies

Complementary & Natural Therapies

5. “Have any A-Fib.com readers reported success working with a Naturopathic doctor? Anyone controlling their A-Fib with supplements?”

In May 2014, Kathy Reynolds from Hollister, Missouri, wrote us that with naturopathic assistance she had been A-Fib-free for over 10 months!

After being diagnosed with Lone A-Fib in October 2012, she was on metoprolol ER 50mg daily, and a short four week run of Coumadin, but she never reached a therapeutic level. Frustrated, she decided to discontinue the Coumadin and replaced it with natural supplements with anticoagulant properties like garlic and turmeric.

She continued to make fresh vegetable/fruit juices at home and eat a high nutrient, anti-inflammatory diet limiting most processed foods. Over the next eight months she had six more A-Fib attacks.

In addition she wrote:

“A naturopathic route was of great value to me. After consulting Dr. Laurell Matthews, ND, in July of 2013, I left her office with a renewed sense of hope. Dr. Matthews, a naturopathic physician (practicing now in Fayetteville, Arkansas) was new on staff at Harrison Optimal Health where I was a patient treated for thyroid and hormonal issues. She had successfully treated patients with A-Fib!

She added several supplements to my daily regimen which made a huge difference and I have been free of A-Fib attacks for over 10 months now!

I no longer live in fear of tomorrow, though I do realize that time will tell. With the guidance of Dr. Matthews, I found relief with supplementation. Potassium and magnesium are very important (though none of my hospital blood work showed any mineral deficiencies, and I attempt to eat a high mineral and nutrient diet) but I take no added calcium. (She also successfully reduced her metoprolol dose down to ½ dose every other day.) 

What was added to my growing list of supplements? My daily regimen includes:

• CoQ10 100mg
• Taurine 1000mg twice/day
• Hawthorne Solid Extract 1/4 tsp twice/day
• Convallaria (Lily of the Valley) 8-10 drops in water twice/day
• Magnesium Citrate 200mg twice/day
• High-Omega 3 fish and flax oils, and coconut oil

Lesson Learned: Try Supplements Before Getting an Ablation

I discovered through a little research that other NDs may prescribe much higher doses of some of these supplements, and I would not advise anyone to self medicate.

Seek an understanding, competent MD or ND who keeps you informed so that ultimately you can be in charge of your own care. In my opinion, there may be some cases where it’s worth trying supplements before resorting to what could be an unnecessary procedure and expense.”

Read more of Kathy’s story (#73): A-Fib Success with Naturopathic Assistance—Over 10 Months A-Fib Free! 

Do you have an A-Fib experience with a Naturopathic doctor to share? We would love to hear from you, just send an email

Last updated: Sunday, August 16, 2015 

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FAQs Natural Therapies: Whole Food or Organic Diet for A-Fib?

 FAQs Natural Therapies: Whole Food or Organic Diet?

Complementary & Natural Therapies

Complementary & Natural Therapies

6. “Is a whole food or organic diet helpful for patients with Atrial Fibrillation? Is there any research recommending one or the other?”

Many health experts believe that eating more whole foods is our best bet for improving health and preventing disease. Numerous studies have found that a diet high in healthy foods like fruits, vegetables, and whole grains are associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease, cancer and type 2 diabetes (also closely associated with Atrial Fibrillation).

A Whole-Food Organic Diet

In an editorial in the ‘Naturopathic Doctor News & Review’, naturopathic doctor Dan Carter writes about treatment for Atrial Fibrillation. He states that a whole-food organic diet (as much as is possible and practical) is preferred for A-Fib patients. Dr. Carter suggests:

•  Eat a sufficient amount of complete protein (½ g of protein per 1 lb of body weight). Include meats, eggs, and low-mercury seafood (cold-water fish, such as salmon, is especially beneficial). Raw dairy is recommended for those who tolerate it; whey protein is useful for smoothies.

•  Eat lots of raw and cooked vegetables and salad greens.

•  Choose as carbohydrate sources sweet potatoes, yams, white potatoes, and white rice. Unless the patient is an athlete, the daily intake should be limited to 150 g.

•  Cook foods with chemically stable oils, such as coconut (best), butter, and palm kernel, and use olive oil on salads and foods after cooking.

•  Avoid simple sugars and seed-derived edible oils (soy, corn, safflower, sunflower, and canola).

Are Whole Food and Organic Foods the Same?

The terms whole food and organic food are often confused. But whole foods are not necessarily organic, nor are organic foods necessarily whole.

Whole foods are unprocessed and unrefined, or processed and refined as little as possible.

Organic foods come from animals free of antibiotics and growth hormones; fruits and vegetables are free of pesticides, ionizing radiation and bioengineering.

Keep in mind, research has not found a diet that will cure your A-Fib. The best you can do is eat a heart healthy diet, limit alcoholic drinks, don’t smoke. Be active and exercise. And control the 4 lifestyle factors associated with A-Fib: high-blood pressure, diabetes, sleep apnea and obesity.

References for this Article

 Last updated: Wednesday, February 4, 2015 

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FAQs Natural Therapies: Use of the Vagal Maneuver for A-Fib Attacks

 FAQs Natural Therapies: The Vagal Maneuver

Complementary & Natural Therapies

Complementary & Natural Therapies

4. “What is the ‘vagal maneuver’? I’ve heard it might help me during an A-Fib episode. What is it and how is it done? Is it safe?”

Have you ever had the hiccups and held your breath for at least 5 seconds trying to get rid of them? That’s called the Valsalva maneuver (one type of vagal maneuver). You also use the maneuver while lifting, coughing, belching. and going to the bathroom.

What if you tried it for an A-Fib attack? Research has found the Valsalva maneuver, if performed properly, is safe and about 25% of time is effective in slowing many types SVT such as atrial fibrillation. (But for some patients the arrhythmia returned shortly after.)

Hans Larsen of the A-Fib Report recommends the Valsalva Maneuver for Lone A-Fib patients not on antiarrhythmic drugs. He describes it this way: “Sit down and bend forward at the waist―hold your breath and strain as if blowing up a balloon.” Hold the maneuver for five seconds or so.

This maneuver greatly increases pressures inside the chest cavity―which stimulates the vagus nerve and increases vagal tone. (The vagus nerve is one of 12 cranial nerves and extends from the brain stem to the abdomen, via various organs including the heart, esophagus and lungs.)

Judi Coffey has written me that repeated deep belching will get her out of an A-Fib attack. (You can contact her at: Luckers567@yahoo.com)

So try the Valsalva maneuver—and try it several times—since it only works about 25% of the time. (After all, it’s cheap and ‘natural’). It just might work for you!

References for this Article

Last updated: Wednesday, August 26, 2015 

Return to FAQ Natural Therapies

FAQs Natural Therapies: What is Naturopathic Medicine?

Complementary & Natural Therapies

Complementary & Natural Therapies

 FAQs Natural Therapies: Naturopathy

3. “A dietitian friend referred me to a Naturopathic doctor. What is naturopathic medicine? Are they ‘real’ physicians?”

Naturopathic medicine (or naturopathy) is based on the belief that the body can heal itself naturally. Naturopathic medicine attempts to improve health, prevent disease, and treat illness by promoting the use of organic foods and exercise; encouraging a healthy, balanced lifestyle; and applying concepts and treatments from other areas of complementary medicine (such as ayurveda, homeopathy, and herbal therapies).

Naturopathic medicine tries to find the cause of the condition rather than focusing solely on treating symptoms.

According to the World Health Organization, the principles of naturopathy can be summarized as:

• “first, do no harm”
• act in cooperation with the healing power of nature
• seek, identify and treat the fundamental cause of the illness
• treat the whole person using individualized treatment
• teach the principles of healthy living and preventive health care

A properly trained naturopathic physician works with other health professionals, referring people to other practitioners for diagnosis or treatment when appropriate.

Is Naturopathy Safe?

If considering a Naturopathic practitioner, you’ll want someone willing to work together with your conventional health care providers. For your safety, it’s important for all of the professionals involved in your health to communicate and cooperate.

Two common concerns about naturopathic medicine are the use of dietary fasting and a bias against immunization (vaccinations).

How is a Naturopathic Doctor Trained? Are they Licensed?

Today, a licensed naturopathic doctor (ND) attends a 4-year, graduate-level naturopathic medical school and studies the same basic sciences as a medical doctor (MD). But the ND also studies alternative approaches to therapy, such as herbal medicine, acupuncture, and bodywork.

Not all naturopathic educational programs are the same. In the United States, the Council on Naturopathic Medical Education (CNME) is the only agency recognized by the U.S. Department of Education to accredit naturopathic programs and colleges. Licensed naturopathic physicians must fulfill state-mandated continuing education requirements annually, and will have a specific scope of practice defined by their state’s law. (List of US states requiring licensing.)

Naturopathy licensing is not universally mandated. In North America, for example, five Canadian provinces, seventeen U.S. states, and the District of Columbia require naturopaths to be licensed.

Selecting a Naturopathic

Selecting a naturopathic practitioner is like choosing any doctor or other health professional—look for someone you trust, who understands your personal care needs. The person you choose depends on the type of care you want to experience, and your comfort level with non-traditional care.

In the U.S., choose a naturopath who graduated from an accredited naturopathic program or college. And if it’s required by your state, is appropriately licensed.

Also see our FAQ answer to: “How do I find a doctor with a more “holistic” approach? I want nutritional counseling and a more integrated approach.” 

Keep your GP and Cardiologist Informed

Always tell your doctors if you are thinking about combining a naturopathic therapy with your conventional medical treatment. Be cautious. Combining treatments, supplements or medications can have unexpected results.

References for this Article

Last updated: Friday, August 28, 2015 

Return to FAQ Natural Therapies

FAQs Natural Therapies: Chiropractic Adjustment for A-Fib?

 FAQs Natural Therapies: Chiropractic Adjustment 

Complementary & Natural Therapies

Complementary & Natural Therapies

7. Do A-Fib patients find chiropractic adjustment useful? If so, what are their results? In the past, I’ve found it helpful for other ailments. Could it help with my A-Fib symptoms?

According to the U.S. National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine: Chiropractic is a health care profession that focuses on the relationship between the body’s structure—mainly the spine—and its functioning. They primarily perform adjustments (manipulations) to the spine or other parts of the body with the goal of correcting alignment problems, alleviating pain, improving function, and supporting the body’s natural ability to heal itself.

There are few clinical studies focused on arrhythmia and ‘manipulation’ techniques (osteopathic or chiropractic).

An A-Fib Patient Reports

We heard from Bente Strong about how he uses chiropractic adjustment for his Vagal A-Fib.1 Vagal atrial fibrillation is often recognized by its frequent occurrence at night (nocturnal paroxysmal A-Fib).

Bente Strong wrote:

“The Vagus nerve2 is central to digestive systems and the upper chambers of the heart. Keeping that area – the neck and thoracic (upper) region of the spine – open, aligned and flexible, clearly helps. I first discovered this after 3 days and nights of non-stop A-Fib, which went away for most of the next ten days after an adjustment.

I now get a chiropractic adjustment every 2 weeks and frequently lie on my back across an exercise ball in order to stretch and adjust myself as best I can.”  

You can email Bente Strong at: bente_l(at)msn.com

Do you have an A-Fib experience using chiropractic techniques to share? We would love to hear from you, just send an email

Last updated: Wednesday, February 4, 2015 

Return to FAQ Natural Therapies

References    (↵ returns to text)
  1. For more about Vagal A-Fib, see our FAQ answer to: What is the difference between “Adrenergic” and “Vagal” Atrial Fibrillation? 
  2. The vagal nerve is one of 12 cranial nerves; it extends from the brain stem to the abdomen, via various organs including the heart, esophagus and lungs.

FAQs Natural Therapies: Acupuncture for A-Fib

 FAQs Natural Therapies: Acupuncture

Complementary & Natural Therapies

Complementary & Natural Therapies

9. “What’s the research on acupuncture and Atrial Fibrillation? I’m willing to try it if it will help ease or reduce my A-Fib episodes.”

Acupuncture is a technique in which practitioners stimulate specific points on the body—most often by inserting thin needles through the skin. It is one of the practices used in traditional Chinese medicine and is generally considered safe when performed by an experienced, well-trained practitioner using sterile needles.

Some conventional medical practitioners—including physicians and dentists—practice acupuncture.

Articles in peer-reviewed medical journals describe the successful use of acupuncture to deal with conditions as varied as cocaine dependency, hiccups, and pregnancy-related pelvic pain. Results from a number of studies suggest that acupuncture may help ease types of chronic pain and reduce the frequency of tension headaches and prevent migraine headaches.

But what about A-Fib patients? Will acupuncture help reduce Atrial Fibrillation episodes or ease symptoms? Should A-Fib patients consider acupuncture treatments?” Read on…

However, clinical practice guidelines are inconsistent in recommendations about acupuncture.

Acupuncture and Arrhythmias

In Traditional Chinese Medicine, stimulation of the Neiguan spot has been utilized to treat palpitations and symptoms related to different cardiovascular diseases.

A 2010 study found acupuncture prevents arrhythmic recurrence after cardioversion in patients with persistent A-Fib. And there’s ample evidence that acupuncture is effective in treating both hypertension and supraventricular tachycardia. The article identified three acupuncture points to be stimulated:

•  Neiguan (PC-6): used to counteract palpitations, and there’s evidence that it help restore autonomic nervous system balance.
•  Shenmen (HT-7): helps calm anxiety, heart palpitations and irregular heart beat.
•  Xinshu (BL-15): has a modulating effect on the autonomic nervous system.

They concluded: “Acupuncture treatment prevents arrhythmic recurrence after cardioversion in patients with persistent AF. This minimally invasive procedure was safe and well tolerated.”

In 2012, researchers in another study observed a similar antiarrhythmic effect in both persistent and paroxysmal A-Fib patients. Two small groups of AF patients received 10 acupuncture sessions once a week with puncturing of the Neiguan, Shenmen and Xinshu spots. (For comparison, a control group was also used as well as a “sham acupuncture” group.) Research findings, through preliminary, “strongly suggest that acupuncture may be an effective non-invasive and safe antiarrhythmic tool in the management of these patients”.

A systematic research review in 2011 looked at 10 randomised controlled trials of acupuncture treatment for cardiac arrhythmias. The researchers concluded that, despite encouraging results, there was not conclusive evidence in support of acupuncture treatment for cardiac arrhythmias.

Is Acupuncture Effective for A-Fib?

Articles in peer-reviewed medical journals describe the successful use of acupuncture to deal with a variety of medical conditions.

According to the British Acupuncture Council:

“In general, acupuncture is believed to stimulate the nervous system and cause the release of neurochemical messenger molecules. The resulting biochemical changes influence the body’s homeostatic mechanisms, thus promoting physical and emotional well-being.”

Do the same medical journals have conclusive evidence that acupuncture works for Atrial Fibrillation? No—not yet.

Are there early indications that acupuncture may have an anti-arrhythmic effect in patients with atrial fibrillation and warrant large-scale trials? Published studies say—Yes!

So you may want to talk with your health care providers about trying acupuncture as a non-invasive and safe treatment for your Atrial Fibrillation.

Credentials and Insurance Coverage

If you decide to visit an acupuncturist, check his or her credentials. Most states require a diploma from the National Certification Commission for Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine for licensing.

Some insurance companies may cover the costs of acupuncture, while others may not. For more information, see NCCAM’s fact sheet Paying for Complementary Health Approaches.

References for this article

Last updated: Tuesday, August 25, 2015 

Return to FAQ Natural Therapies

FAQ: Natural Therapies & Holistic Treatment for A-Fib

Complementary & Natural Therapies

Complementary & Natural Therapies

FAQ: Natural Therapies & Holistic Treatment

Many A-Fib patients have questions about treatment alternatives such as naturopathic doctors, complementary or integrated medicine as well as mind/body practices (such as chiropractic, acupuncture, yoga and meditation).

1. How do I find a doctor with a more “holistic” approach? I want nutritional counseling and a more integrated approach to my A-Fib treatment plan?

2. I’ve read that yoga and acupuncture are considered ‘Complementary Medicine’. What is that? How does it relate to conventional medicine?

3. “A dietitian friend referred me to a Naturopathic doctor. What is naturopathic medicine? Are they ‘real’ physicians?

4. What is the ‘vagal maneuver’? I’ve heard it might help me during an A-Fib episode. What is it and how is it done? Is it safe?

5. Have any A-Fib.com readers reported success working with a Naturopathic doctor? Anyone controlling their A-Fib with supplements?

6. Is a whole food or organic diet helpful for patients with Atrial Fibrillation? Is there any research recommending one or the other?

7. Do A-Fib patients find chiropractic adjustment useful? If so, what are their results? In the past, I’ve found it helpful for other ailments. Could it help with my A-Fib symptoms?

8. I do Yoga. It relaxes me and helps with my stress level. Is there any evidence on Yoga helping with other A-Fib symptoms?

9. “What’s the research on acupuncture and Atrial Fibrillation? I’m willing to try it if it will help ease or reduce my A-Fib episodes.”

10. “Have there been any tests comparing natural blood thinners to the new anticoagulants (NOACs) in terms of efficacy and speed of onset?

“Most people use non-mainstream approaches along with conventional treatments. The boundaries between complementary and conventional medicine overlap and change with time.” ∼ US National Institutes of Health

Last updated: Wednesday, May 18, 2016 

Return to Frequently Asked Questions

FAQs Natural Therapies: What is Complementary Medicine?

 FAQs Natural Therapies: Complementary Medicine

Complementary & Natural Therapies

Complementary & Natural Therapies

2. “I’ve read that yoga and acupuncture are considered ‘Complementary Medicine’. What is that? How does it relate to conventional medicine?

The word “complementary” means “in addition to.” “Complementary” medicine generally refers to using a non-mainstream approach together with conventional medicine, that is, treatment and medicine that you use in addition to your doctor’s standard care.

[By contrast the term “Alternative” medicine refers to using a non-mainstream approach in place of conventional medicine.]

You’ve probably heard of ‘complementary’ treatments and perhaps even used one or more. Common examples are:

♠  Acupuncture
♠  Yoga
♠  Massage therapy
♠  Herbal remedies
♠  Naturopathic medicine

Should You Use Complementary Medicine?

Before you decide to use this type of treatment, think about these questions:

•  Why are you considering this treatment? People often use complementary medicine to treat long-term health problems or to stay healthy. But if you are looking for a “cure-all,” you may be disappointed. Before you begin to use it, make sure that you learn how well it is likely to work.

•  What are you comfortable with? Part of the philosophy of some forms of complementary medicine is to listen to and touch people in a healing way. Some people find great comfort in this. Others may be bothered by it.

What are the Risks?

The greatest risk is that you may use these treatments instead of going to your regular doctor. Complementary medicine should be in addition to treatment from your doctor. Otherwise you may miss important treatment that could save your life.

Always talk to your doctor before you use any new medicines. Some herbs or supplements, for example, an be dangerous when they are combined with a prescription medicine you are taking.

What are the Benefits?

One benefit is that many people who practice complementary medicine take a “whole person,” or holistic, approach to treatment. They may take an hour or more to ask you questions about your lifestyle, habits, and background. This makes many people feel better about the treatment and the person giving the treatment itself. Some people feel more of a sense of control because they are more involved in their own health.

Beware of a practitioner who is critical of your traditional care or suggests ending it. Most ‘complementary’ practitioners also value conventional medicine.

If Considering a Complementary Healthcare Practitioner

The U.S. National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM), part of the U.S. Institutes of Health, offers this advice if you are considering going to a complementary health practitioner:

 •  Select a complementary practitioner with the same care you would use in choosing a conventional medical provider.
•  Understand your state and local government’s requirements for licensing and certification of practitioners, and the limitations of those requirements.
•  Do not use an unproven product or practice to replace proven conventional care or as a reason to postpone seeing a health care provider about a medical problem.
•  Tell all your health care providers about any complementary health approaches you use. Give them a full picture of what you do to manage your health. This will help ensure coordinated and safe care.

Some insurance companies cover the costs of complementary treatments, while others may not. Check to see what your plan covers, and refer the NCCAM fact sheet Paying for Complementary Health Approaches.

For tips about talking with your health care providers about complementary health approaches, see NCCAM’s Time to Talk campaign.

Last updated: Wednesday, August 26, 2015 

Return to FAQ Natural Therapies

FAQs Natural Therapies: Finding Doctor with a Holistic Approach

 FAQs Natural Therapies: Holistic Approach 

Complementary & Natural Therapies

1. “How do I find a doctor with a more “holistic” approach? I want nutritional counseling and a more integrated approach to my A-Fib treatment plan.”

You may want to search for physicians who practice Complementary or Integrative medicine, Naturopathic doctors and Registered Nutrition and Dietetic professionals. Professional associations are useful places to start your search. We offer links to online search tools for the U.S., Canada, Australia and the UK.

U.S. organizations with online search tools:

• American College for Advancement in Medicine (ACAM) promotes Complementary and Integrative Medicine and is the premier source for patients looking for an integrative medicine provider. The Physician+Link is accessed by over 30,000 unique visitors each month. Use the ‘Physician + Link’ online search tool or call 1-800-532-3688 for help in locating a physician near you.

• The Academy of Integrative Health & Medicine  promotes the integration of conventional with complementary and alternative medicine. Besides licensed medical doctors who practice holistic medicine, there are also naturopathic physicians, acupuncturists, chiropractors and massage therapists. Use their “Find a Provider” online search to find a provider in your area.

•  American Association of Naturopathic Physicians (AANP) association members are graduates of naturopathic medical schools accredited by the Council on Naturopathic Medical Education (recognized by the U.S. Department of Education) with programs leading to the Doctor of Naturopathic Medicine (N.D. or N.M.D.) or Doctor of Naturopathy (N.D.) degree. Use the AANP search tools to find an NP doctor near you.

•  Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics is the world’s largest organization of food and nutrition professionals and is committed to improving the nation’s health through research, education and advocacy.  Use their ’Find a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist‘ online referral service.

Online search tools for Canada, Australia and the UK:

•  Canadian Association of Naturopathic Doctors (CAND) is the national association for qualified naturopathic doctors across Canada. For a naturopathic doctor in Canada, use their Find A Naturopathic Doctor online referral service.

•  Australasian Integrative Medicine Association (AIMA) represents the doctors and other health care professionals who practice integrative medicine in Australia and New Zealand. (The AIMA directory is currently off-line.) They provide a link to the “Find a Doctor‘ service by the Australasian College of Nutritional and Environmental Medicine (ACEM).

• Complementary and Natural Healthcare Council (CNHC) is the UK voluntary regulator for complementary healthcare practitioners and has been approved as an Accredited Voluntary Register. ⇒ Use the ‘Search the Register‘ button at the top of their home page, or use this link.

Also see How To Find A Complementary Health Practitioner on the U.S. National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM)’s website. You’ll find information and resources about professional standards, training, and other requirements for complementary health practitioners. NCCAM is the US government’s lead agency for scientific research on complementary and alternative medicine.

Last updated: Wednesday, February 4, 2015 

Return to FAQ Natural Therapies

FAQ Minerals & Supplements: Natural Remedies for PVCs & PACs

FAQ Minerals Deficiencies: PVCs & PACs 

Minerals & Supplements for a Healthy Heart

Minerals & Supplements

 3. “I have annoying PVCs and PACs with my A-Fib. Are there natural remedies to reduce these extra beats and palpitations? My doctor says to ignore them.”

Doctors generally consider Premature Ventricle Contractions (PVCs) and Premature Atrial Contractions (PACs) as benign and not something to worry about. Everyone gets them occasionally. But for people with A-Fib, PVCs and PACs seem to be more frequent and often seem to precede an A-Fib attack

Dr. Stephen T. Sinatra in his book, The Sinatra Solution—Metabolic Cardiology, recommends the following natural “cocktail” for suppressing PACs and PVCs, what he calls the “awesome foursome”:

L-carnitine. A derivative of the amino acid lysine which helps to turn fat into energy. It promotes energy metabolism and enhances cardiac function. Some consider it the single most important nutrient in cardiac health. It reduces PVCs. Dosage: Daily: 750-2000 mg of L-Carnitine Fumerate (250 to 500 mg three to four times a day).

Coenzyme Q10 (Ubiquinone), A naturally occurring enzyme, part of the quinone chemical group, that is found in every cell in the body. It produces energy in the mitochondria and energizes the heart. 95% of the body’s energy is generated by CoQ10, which generates energy in the form of ATP. It prolongs the action potential and helps maintain sinus rhythm. It improves heart rhythm problems. Dosage: 100-300 mg daily in divided doses with meals. 

D-ribose. A five-carbon sugar that is a regulator in the production of ATP. The only compound used by the body to replenish depleted energy stores. Ribose increases tolerance to cardiac stress, improves exercise tolerance and physical function, provides cardiac energy needed to maintain normal heart function, increases cardiac efficiency, lowers stress during exercise, and maintains healthy energy levels in heart and muscle. Dosage: Daily: 7-10 grams of Ribose powder. Take in divided doses with meals or just before and after exercise.

Magnesium. A vital mineral used by the enzymes that make energy synthesis and recycling possible. Adequate intracellular magnesium is essential to normal tissue and organ function. Low magnesium is associated with cardiac abnormalities, fibrillation, and vascular and muscle spasms, and is seen in cardiac failure. Dosage: A recommended goal is a minimum 600 mg/day, preferably 800 mg. (For example, 200mg three times a day and 200 mg at bedtime.)

In extreme cases where the extra beats are very disturbing and damage one’s quality of life, Electrophysiologists (EPs) can perform an ablation for them similar to an ablation for A-Fib. But this is a specialized procedure that not all EPs perform or are willing to perform.

References for this Article

Return to: FAQ Minerals & Supplements

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