Doctors & patients are saying about 'A-Fib.com'...


"A-Fib.com is a great web site for patients, that is unequaled by anything else out there."

Dr. Douglas L. Packer, MD, FHRS, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN

"Jill and I put you and your work in our prayers every night. What you do to help people through this [A-Fib] process is really incredible."

Jill and Steve Douglas, East Troy, WI 

“I really appreciate all the information on your website as it allows me to be a better informed patient and to know what questions to ask my EP. 

Faye Spencer, Boise, ID, April 2017

“I think your site has helped a lot of patients.”

Dr. Hugh G. Calkins, MD  Johns Hopkins,
Baltimore, MD


Doctors & patients are saying about 'Beat Your A-Fib'...


"If I had [your book] 10 years ago, it would have saved me 8 years of hell.”

Roy Salmon, Patient, A-Fib Free,
Adelaide, Australia

"This book is incredibly complete and easy-to-understand for anybody. I certainly recommend it for patients who want to know more about atrial fibrillation than what they will learn from doctors...."

Pierre Jaïs, M.D. Professor of Cardiology, Haut-Lévêque Hospital, Bordeaux, France

"Dear Steve, I saw a patient this morning with your book [in hand] and highlights throughout. She loves it and finds it very useful to help her in dealing with atrial fibrillation."

Dr. Wilber Su,
Cavanaugh Heart Center, 
Phoenix, AZ

"...masterful. You managed to combine an encyclopedic compilation of information with the simplicity of presentation that enhances the delivery of the information to the reader. This is not an easy thing to do, but you have been very, very successful at it."

Ira David Levin, heart patient, 
Rome, Italy

"Within the pages of Beat Your A-Fib, Dr. Steve Ryan, PhD, provides a comprehensive guide for persons seeking to find a cure for their Atrial Fibrillation."

Walter Kerwin, MD, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA


A-Fib Patient Stories

Our Patient-to-Patient Resources: Help from Others with Atrial Fibrillation

To help you cope with your Atrial Fibrillation, we offer you the resources to educate yourself about A-Fib and your treatment options, and to arm yourself with the skills to navigate a path to a life without Atrial Fibrillation.

Our Personal A-Fib stories of Hope and Courage and our A-Fib Support Volunteers are two resources to help answer your questions and bolster your resolve to Seek Your A-Fib Cure (or best outcome for you).

A-Fib Patient Stories of Hope, Courage and Lessons Learned

Your first experiences with Atrial Fibrillation have changed your life in a number of ways: dealing with your A-Fib symptoms, the emotional toll as well, and the impact on your family.

It’s encouraging to read how someone else has dealt with their A-Fib. In our 99+ Personal A-Fib Stories of Hope, A-Fib patients tell their stories to encourage and offer you hope. (The first story is Steve Ryan’s in 1998). Many writers have included their email address if you want to contact them directly. To browse our patient experiences, go to Personal A-Fib Stories of Hope and Courage.

Offering Hope: Our A-Fib Support Volunteers

Having someone you can turn to for advice, emotional support, and a sense of hope that you can be cured, may bring you peace of mind. Our A-Fib Support Volunteers have gone through a lot while seeking their A-Fib cure. They have been helped along the way and want to return the favor. They answer questions and offer you encouragement through exchanging emails and sharing their stories.

Our volunteer listings are organized by geographic locations, within the U. S. and internationally by country and/or region.  Learn how to contact our A-Fib Support Volunteers.

Readers post their stories and volunteer to help you to
Seek your Cure. 

Update: My Post-Abaltion 2-Month Checkup

It’s been almost two months since my catheter ablation August 1, 2019 at St. John’s Hospital in Santa Monica, CA. And I’m feeling fine.

Just had a check-up with my EP, Dr. Shephal Doshi, on Wednesday. I haven’t had an A-Fib episode for a month.

My ECG looks perfect (see below). Notice how good the P-wave looks which often disappears when you have A-Fib. (Want to learn how read an ECG? See my article, Understanding the EKG Signal.)

Steve Ryan, A-Fib.com. ECG on Sept 25, 2019 by Dr Doshi. Verdict: all is normal!

My ECG on Sept 25, 2019 by Dr Doshi. Verdict: all is normal!

My Reveal LINQ Loop Heart rate Monitor Report

When you look at the report from my Reveal LINQ inplanted monitor, you can see I have had some tachycardia (marked in blue). But I think that may have come from the intense 100 meters sprints I do at the track. (Tachycardia is anything over 100 beats/minute.) Not to worry. Tachycardias do sometimes occur after an ablation. But one’s heartbeat usually returns to normal, as did mine.

Steve Ryan, A-Fib.com: My implanted LINQ heart monitor report 9-25-19. Note: Tachy and Pause.

My implanted LINQ heart monitor report 9-25-19. Note: Tachy and Pause.

As I reported before, during my first month post-op, I had one three-second pause at 2:00 am which isn’t of concern to me (marked in red).

Though my EP suggests putting in a pacemaker, I’d rather wait till after my blanking period is over. And even then, I’m against having a pacemaker unless I’m dizzy and feeling faint. Who wants to be burdened with a pacemaker for the rest of one’s life if it isn’t really necessary?

The Best News of All

And perhaps my best news is I don’t have to take my anticoagulant (Xarelto) any more. Yea!

Now it’s just one month to go in my 3-month post-ablation blanking/healing period. If it’s smooth sailing this next month, I’ll report again then.

For all my reports about the return of my Atrial Fibrillation after 21 years, see the following posts:

Sept 2018: Has My A-Fib Returned? I Get an Insertable Wireless Monitor
Oct 2018: Part 2: My Medtronic Reveal LINQ loop recorder21-Day results
Nov 2018: Part 3: PVCs/PACs but No A-Fib; False positives from my LINQ Monitor
July 2019: My 20-year Warranty Ran Out! My A-Fib is Back!
Aug 2, 2019: My Catheter Ablation was a Success—I was Home the Same Day
Aug 5, 2019: My A-Fib RF Catheter Ablations: 1998 vs 2019

My A-Fib RF Catheter Ablations: 1998 vs 2019

When I developed paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation in 1997, I was very symptomatic. This time, in 2019, I didn’t have any symptoms—instead my A-Fib was detected by my tiny, inserted Medtronic Reveal LINQ loop monitor/recorder.

More Differences Between 1998 and 2019

Since 1998, the treatment of A-Fib by catheter ablation has advanced by light years including 3D Mapping and ablation systems and catheter technologies.

My last ablation 21 years ago in Bordeaux, France lasted eight+ hours. This one at St. John’s Hospital in Santa Monica, CA took only 2-3 hours.

In Bordeaux, I was in the hospital for 9 days (mostly for observation, and a “touch up” second EP lab visit). In 2019, I was in and out in 12 hours.

Second Time Around: My A-Fib Catheter Ablation Prep

Steve Ryan pre-op A-Fib ablation

Pre-op: Steve with nurse inserting IV

On Thursday, August 1st, my wife, Patti, and I arrived at St. John’s around 5:30 am.

The nurses did the usual insertion of an IV port. They had trouble getting into my left arm and used the right. Then they shaved not just my groin but my chest and back too so that they could more easily attach the electrode pads for the mapping system (those pads were cold).

Then they wheeled me into the EP lab where it seemed like an army of people were waiting on me (probably around 8 people.) They were very friendly and super-efficient in their gowns and face masks.

Dr. Shephal Doshi of Pacific Heart Institute did my RF catheter ablation. (Both he and the anesthesiologist visited me in pre-op before the ablation.) Dr. Doshi has an excellent rapport with the staff and has a great sense of humor.

Out Like a Light

Before I knew it, they had a mask over my face, and I was out like a light. (Dr. Doshi said I was a “cheap date.”)

Mapping of my A-Fib heart - Steve Ryan August 2019

Mapping screen showing my A-Fib heart – the dots are the ablation lesions – notice the tight arrangement; Steve Ryan August 2019

Thanks to Dr. Doshi, we have loads of photos of my RF catheter ablation taken from the EP lab control room and some from inside the EP lab. (I intend to get an explanation of each screen from him to share with you later.)

Post-Ablation Recovery

I didn’t wake up until in the recovery room. Dr. Doshi said everything went very well. I will give you more technical details as I learn them (I don’t remember much of what he said at the time.)

He told Patti that indeed he could see the ablation lesions from my first ablation in 1998, which were around just two of my pulmonary veins (and some other areas). So, no wonder I needed a “touch-up”.

I don’t know too many details from 1998—I didn’t know to ask for the Operating Room (OR) report back then.

Post op: Dr Doshi and nurse Jamie removing Steve’s groin stitch.

To close the one catheter incision point in my right femoral vein, he used some kind of sliding figure-eight stitch that could be loosened or tightened as needed. That stitch was painful and hurt for a while. It was removed before I left the hospital.

In the recovery room I remember them bringing me a vegetable soup which tasted delicious. Patti fed me bits of a lunch of chicken salad and raw vegetables, low-fat milk and pineapple chunks.

I was discharged about 4:30pm. After a stop at the pharmacy, we were home by 6pm. Amazing compared to my first catheter ablation in 1998. In and out in under 12 hours!

Meds: Pantoprazole and Xarelto

Dr. Doshi said I have a large esophagus so he was concerned about acid reflux damage. To prevent the very rare complication Atrial Esophageal Fistula, I was given a prescription for the Proton Pump Inhibitor Pantoprazole SOD 40 mg to be taken once a day. I did have some acid reflux the first day, but none since I started taking the Pantoprazole. (For more about Atrial Esophageal Fistula , see Dr. David Keane’s AF Symposium 2014 presentation, “Complications Associated with Catheter Ablation for AF”.)

And I’m continuing to take Xarelto 20 mg (rivaroxaban) at night with a meal (I was also on it two weeks prior to my ablation).

Recovering at Home

Dr. Shephal Doshi and Steve Ryan before his A-Fib catheter ablation Aug 1 2019

My wife, Patti, drove me home that evening. I felt terrific. But that wasn’t to last.

No problems with my heart, but the next night (Friday), I developed a low-grade fever and felt very weak and unbalanced the next day. I slept a lot Saturday and felt better.

Sunday I was scheduled to be a lector at our local Catholic church. ­(I tried to get someone to sub for me but couldn’t find anyone.) I did read the scriptures for our congregation and felt fine. But went straight home after (I wouldn’t recommend this for everyone). One needs rest after an ablation.

As I write this Sunday night, I feel fine, just a bit tired. I’ll write more when I talk with Dr Doshi about my fever and after my two-week checkup.

Tony Rejects Drug Therapy: Says to Ask Questions, None are Stupid

Tony Hall, Evansville, IN, was 54 years old when he develped Atrial Fibrillation in January 2014. After confirming his diagnosis at the hospital, he wrote:

“I sit in the passenger seat feeling like a pet heading to a kennel. Suddenly things are different. I no longer have that “healthy as a horse” attitude.”

He started drug therapy. Then came a cardioconversion, but that didn’t keep him in normal sinus rhythm for long. He was in and out of A-Fib, and by August was in persistent A-Fib.

Learning His Treatment Options

Tony didn’t passively accept everything he was hearing from doctors and others.

He and his wife, Jill, read as much as they could and critically waded through the information they found. (I’m continually amazed at how much mis-information there is about A-Fib on the internet and in the media.)

5-months post-ablation, Tony and Jill after 10K race.

After doing his research, educating himself about treatment options and learning what his health insurance would cover, he chose to have a catheter ablation at the Mayo Clinic in December 2014.

During his three month blanking period, he had some sporadic fluttering and early on a couple of brief A-Fib episodes.

Off all medication and A-Fib-free, in March 2015 he completed a 10K race beating his time from the previous year by a fraction.

Becoming his Own Best Patient Advocate

Tony and Jill are great examples for all A-Fibbers of how to become your own best patient advocate. He rejected endless trials of various drug therapies. Instead he opted for a catheter ablation just shy of a year after his initial A-Fib diagnosis.

In his A-Fib story, he shares this advice to others considering a catheter ablation:

“Make sure, if you desire to have an ablation, that your reasoning is sound and that you have a good argument as to why drug therapy is not the way you want to go.
Having an ablation as front line treatment for A-Fib is not embraced by every EP, and many are reluctant to ablate until drug therapy has failed.
Be persistent and move on [to another doctor] if you are met with resistance.”

For Tony Hall’s personal experience story, see: Very Active 54-Year Old Became His Own Patient Advocate; Chose Ablation as First Line Treatment.

Medical Marijuana: A-Fib Patients Offer Personal Experiences

Due to the increased use of medical marijuana in California and other states, we should soon be getting more data on marijuana’s effects on Atrial Fibrillation.

Several readers with A-Fib have emailed me to share their experiences and observations with marijuana. There seems to be a lot of interest every time I write about this topic.

How about you? I’d love to get more first-hand feedback from A-Fib users. Please email me.

First-Hand Experiences: A-Fib and Medical Marijuana

Jim, an A-Fib patient, has kindly shared his personal use of marijuana and how it helps him. He has tried various meds, cardioversion, and had a failed ablation. He owns his own business in California and is under a lot of stress.

♥ JIM: “Because of all of this, I was having trouble sleeping and was getting very stressed out. But instead of taking something pharmaceutical, I turned to medical marijuana. It changed my life. I come home at night, have some marijuana edibles, and the stress goes away. I sleep wonderfully at night, waking up fresh and ready for another day.

I told my doctor who understands. He says that marijuana edibles shouldn’t have anything to do with A-Fib, and that I can continue to take them.”

On the other hand, John writes that:

♥ JOHN: “99% of his A-Fib attacks occurred while under the influence of marijuana.”

And others add their experiences:

♥ JONATHAN: “I tried a tiny bit of brownie for the first time since being diagnosed with A-Fib (occasional episodes). It was OK until about two hours later. I went into A-Fib and, a bit later, came the closest I ever have to blacking out. I don’t think it’s for me anymore.”

You can join the discussion, too. If you have used marijuana to help with your A-Fib symptoms, email me and share your experience.

♥ WILLIAM: “The A-Fib ablation has been very successful, except the two times that I went into A-Fib after smoking marijuana. I’m a lifelong recreational marijuana smoker, also smoke to relieve the pain from six surgeries on my right arm. Both times that I’ve gone into A-Fib since my last ablation have been after smoking marijuana. After the latest episode I’ve quite smoking marijuana because of the evidence that it can lead to A-Fib.”

♥ SCOTT: “I am currently 55 years old and have been through 15 cardioversions due to A-Fib. I smoked marijuana pretty much daily and noticed that, when I smoked, my heart rate went up. So, I stopped smoking altogether. Since quitting smoking marijuana 7 years ago, I have not had a single case of going into A-Fib. I’m positive that the two are related.”

Scott added that he also stopped drinking which helped. He used to drink a six pack daily.


PODCAST: Marijuana—Good, Bad or Ugly for Patients with A-Fib?

For my most recent report about A-Fib and Marijuana, listen to my Podcast with Travis Van Slooten, publisher of LivingWithAtrialFibrillation.com. (About 18 min. in length.) Includes transcript.

PODCAST

Marijuana—Good, Bad or Ugly for Patients with A-Fib?

With Steve Ryan and Travis Van Slooten (18 min.)

Go to Podcast

References for this article
Korantzopoulos, P. et al. Atrial Fibrillation and Marijuana Smoking. International Journal of Clinical Practice. 2008;62(2):308-313.

Petronis KR, Anthony JC. An epidemiologic investigation of marijuana- and cocaine-related palpitations. Drug Alcohol Depend 1989; 23: 219-26.

Rettner, R. Marijuana Use May Raise Stroke Risk in Young Adults. LiveScience.com, MyHealthNewsDaily February 08, 2013. Last accessed Nov 5, 2014. URL: http://www.livescience.com/26965-marijuana-smoking-stroke-risk.html

How to Cook up Your A-Fib Plan for a Cure

At A-Fib.com we encourage you to become your own best patient advocate. Here’s our “recipe” to help you look beyond common drug therapies and nourish you on your path to an A-Fib cure or best outcome for you.

We hope the ingredients in our “recipe” will help you in your journey to a life free of the burden of Atrial Fibrillation. At A-Fib.com we can help you, and many of our A-Fib.com readers have written their personal stories to help you, too.

A-Fib Patient Stories: Listed by Topic

It’s encouraging to read how someone else has dealt with their A-Fib. In our 99+ Personal A-Fib Stories of Hope, A-Fib patients tell their stories to help bolster your determination to seek a life free of A-Fib.

Pick an A-Fib story by Theme or Topic: You may find it helpful to read a specific type(s) of stories. For example, about A-Fib patients in your age group, patients with the same symptoms as yours, or perhaps patients who have had a specific treatment such as a cardioversion, catheter ablation or a mini-maze surgery.

Select stories by theme or topic

How to Choose an A-Fib story: To help you select a personal A-Fib story, we’ve cross-referenced them by five major themes and topics:

by Cause
by Risk Factor
by Symptom
by Age group/Years with A-Fib
by Treatment

Each category has several subcategories. To browse stories on a specific subject, see Personal A-Fib Stories ‘Listed by Subject’.

At A-Fib.com, we can help you to
Whip up your Resolve to
Seek your Cure. 

‘A-Fib-Zebub’ Whispers in your Ear …”A-Fib’s not that Bad”

That little voice has a name: A-Fib Zebub.

This little character is called “That Demon A-Fib-Zebub“. He’s that tiny voice that’s whispers in your ear…“You don’t look sick! A-Fib’s not that bad. You can live with it”.

Don’t Listen to A-Fib-Zebub!

Any time A-Fib-Zebub pops up in your head, it’s time to remember that A-Fib is not benign, but a progressive disease. It’s not a “nuisance arrhythmia” as some doctors consider it.

And don’t, as one doctor told his patient, just “take your meds and get used to it”.

Don’t Settle for a Lifetime on Meds: Aim for a Cure

Who wants this demon on their shoulder for the rest of their lives? Don’t listen to A-Fib-Zebub! Instead seek your A-Fib cure like I did (see my personal A-Fib story: Finding my Cure).

For many, many patients, A-Fib is definitely curable.

Always Aim High! If you have A-Fib, no matter how long you’ve had it, you should aim for a complete and permanent cure. Shoot for the moon, as they say, and you’ll find the best outcome for you and your type of A-Fib.

Personal Stories of Hope and Lessons Learned

To help bolster your resolve, seek encouragement from other patients. Other A-Fib patients have been where you are right now and have shared their personal experiences (starting with story #1 by Steve Ryan).

Each story is told in their own words. Some stories are told in a few paragraphs while other stories are longer, spanning years, even decades. Symptoms will vary, and treatments choices run the full gamut.

Browse through our list of over 99 Personal A-Fib stories of Hope. Look for patients with similar symptoms or situations as your own. Many writers have included their email address if you want to contact them directly. Read a story or two to learn how others are dealing with this demon we call Atrial Fibrillation. Their hope and courage is contagious.

Do not learn to live with Atrial Fibrillation.
Seek Your Cure!

For Inspiration: ‘A-Fib’s Demise’ a Poem by Emmett Finch, the Malibu Poet

At the beginning of this new year, we offer you a poem written for A-Fib patients by our friend Emmett Finch, the Malibu Poet. We met Emmett when we researched his personal A-Fib story for our book, Beat Your A-Fib (“40-Year Battle With A-Fib Includes AV Node Ablation With Pacemaker”).

Emmett F.

Emmett honored us with a special poem ‘A-Fib’s Demise’. It’s for people of faith who look for hope and help from the Divine but also see doctors, medicines, supplements, etc. as manifestations of the “creative power we call God.”

We hope A-Fib’s Demise will inspire you during this coming year to seek your A-Fib cure!  (Note: You can download and print the PDF.)

Emmett's Poem - A-Fib_s Demise

Wishing you a blessed year to come
filled with good heart health.

The Mental Games that A-Fib Plays―Anthony Offers Ways to Cope

For a substantial portion of A-Fib patients, the impact on ‘quality of life’ extends beyond our beating heart. Atrial Fibrillation wreaks havoc with your head as well.

In his A-Fib story, Anthony Bladon wrote:

“The mental games that A-Fib play are insidious. The constant lurking fear that A-Fib may spontaneously return. I absolutely needed to develop coping mechanisms. I firmly encourage you to do the same!”

Recent research indicates that “psychological distress” worsens the severity of A-Fib symptoms.

How Anthony Learned to Cope

Now A-Fib free, Anthony recommends several coping techniques: frequent short rests, staying hydrated and practicing relaxation exercises to help you remain unstressed.

He advises you to confront your A-Fib fears directly. Don’t let your fears mill around in your subconscious. Another suggestion is to:

“…set aside a 20 minute worrying time during the day and refuse to think about troubling fears at any other time.”

In addition, he developed what he calls an ‘anxiety thoughts log’ for writing down word-for-word what the anxious thought was, when, and what was the trigger. He explained how it helped him:

“By confronting my most extreme fears very explicitly (‘Is this a TIA or A-Fib?’ or ‘I’m afraid of a stroke, I might die or be disabled’, or ‘I can’t contemplate a third ablation!’), it became easier to re-state and contextualize them in a more reasonable frame of mind, thereby reducing my anxiety.”

Anthony is pleased with the eventual outcome of his two CryoAblations. After being A-Fib free for two years he wrote, “I feel like a new man!” To read more, see Anthony’s A-Fib story.

Fight your Fears! Ambush your Anxiety!

The emotional effects of Atrial Fibrillation can be debilitating. Recent research indicates that “psychological distress” worsens the severity of A-Fib symptoms.

A-Fib wreaks havoc with your head as well as your heart. Anxiety, fear, worry, confusion, frustration and depression. And at times, anger.

But, don’t expect much help from your heart doctors. They aren’t trained or often have little effective experience in dealing with the psychological and emotional aspects of A-Fib.

Don’t be ashamed to admit how A-Fib makes you feel (especially if you’re a guy). Your psyche is just as important as your physical heart. Anthony shared about seeking professional advice:

“If fears of A-Fib prey on your mind, I encourage you to seek out the help of a professional psychologist, as I did. After a few sessions of consultation, and with the continued use of tools like these, I was fully able to cope.”

Tell yourself: It’s okay to seek professional help to deal with the emotions that often accompany A-Fib. (Just acknowledging you have some or all of these symptoms is a step in the right direction.)

For more ideas, see our article: Seven Ways to Cope With Your A-Fib Fear and Anxiety

Have you tried any of Anthony’s coping techniques? Or do you have other ideas? If you have suggestions or programs that helped reduce your A-Fib-related anxiety, please email me and let me know.

Where it All Began: Steve Ryan’s A-Fib Story (A-Fib.com’s 1st Personal Experience)

Steve Ryan had his first A‑Fib attack in early 1997 at age 56 when in apparent good health. He ran 400 meter dashes and 5K’s, lived in Los Angeles, CA and worked on the camera crew of the NBC-TV soap opera “Days of Our Lives”. He had to take disability leave when episodes of erratic heart beats lead to dizzy spells making it unsafe for him to work around heavy equipment.

Steve shares that since finding his Atrial Fibrillation cure in April 1998, his mission has been to spare others the frustration, depression, and debilitating quality of life that Atrial Fibrillation caused him.

Steve Ryan, Bordeaux France before his 1998 ablation - A-Fib.com

Steve with 10-lead portable monitor before PVI, Bordeaux hospital, April 1998

“…before I decided to go to CHU Hopitaux de Bordeaux in France, I was on and off many, many different medications over the course of 15 months or so. None of them seemed to do much good. Then I had two catheter ablations of the right atrium, and one aborted attempt of the left atrium. All to no effect.
During my ten-day stay in the Bordeaux hospital, I had a successful “Focal Point Catheter Ablation” (now called Pulmonary Vein Ablation/Isolation) in the left atrium. Due to recurrence, I had a second ablation a week after the first. (So does that add up to two failed right atrium ablations and two left-atrium ablations?)
Looking back to 1997, I see that the two right atrium ablations were probably a waste of effort as we now know that A-Fib usually originates in the left atrium (and A-Flutter from the right atrium). For that reason, most of today’s EPs will ablate the left atrium for A-Fib, but as a precaution, will also ablate the right atrium against any rogue A-Fib signals and to address diagnosed (or undiagnosed) A-Flutter.”

Learn How Steve Found his A-Fib Cure

Steve Ryan, Bordeaux France before his 1998 ablation - A-Fib.com

Steve with monitor

Continue reading to learn how Steve educated himself about his Atrial Fibrillation and sent his records to the best EPs in the U.S. for advice.

And how he decided to travel to France to see Dr. Michel Haissaguerre, the world-reknown researcher and cardiac electrophysiologist who discovered the link between A-Fib and the Pulmonary Veins and who invented the PVI procedure.

Go to the first A-Fib.com personal experience story: Steve S. Ryan: Finding My A‑Fib Cure by Early Focal Catheter Ablation Procedure in 1998.

Rainbow over Steve’s hospital room after his second PVI; We took it as a blessing for his cure!

After 18 years in A-Fib, Triathlete Mike Jones Asked, “Could I Be so Fortunate?”

In his A-Fib story, Mike Jones writes that he’d been a very physically active middle age man who competed in running, triathlons and handball. It was difficult for him to accept that “something was wrong”.

In fact, he had paroxysmal A-Fib episodes for at least three years before his official diagnosis. Over the many years, he had been on various drug therapies, but nonetheless, his A-Fib episodes become very debilitating. He shares:

Mike Jones

“For many years, surgical intervention was out of reach, and financially out of the question for me. And, in those days, there was only the “Maze”. Along the way, I read a little bit about the Mini Maze, which did not inspire me much either.
It wasn’t until I found “A-Fib Resources for Patients” [A-Fib.com] that I began to take a real interest in researching PVI/PVA [Pulmonary Vein Isolation/Ablation] .”

Mike recalls the day after his life-changing catheter ablation:

“On the drive home the following afternoon, I thought about all those years that I had spent….with all of the drugs, and all of the depressing hours, with all of the sacrifices, and all of the fear…nearly 15 years of it.
Then, my long-awaited PVI procedure. In a 2 day period of time, with little discomfort (and within my budget!) all of that might now be behind me.
Could I be so fortunate?
I feel a little foolish now, a little sheepish, that I had made such a big thing out of getting this procedure done.”

Life After His Ablation

In the ten months following his ablation, Mike writes that he only had two episodes early on and that he continues to take soaks in Epson salts once a week to keep his magnesium levels up.

He writes about his life now that it is free of A-Fib:

 “I do not take any blood thinners, and no heart medication whatsoever. In my 70’s now, I won’t be running any endurance races, and my conditioning level is too low for any serious handball (yet).
But my energy level is high enough that I live a very normal life. I am a hobby woodworker, and I typically spend anywhere from 4 to 6 hours a day in my shop. I walk, swim, cut wood, and, when nobody is looking…I dance.
“I walk, swim, cut wood, and, when nobody is looking…I dance.”
I understand that the A-Fibs might one day return, but I would have no hesitation in returning for a tune up if, or when, that day should ever arrive.”

―Mike Jones, Redding, CA, Now A-Fib free after an ablation using both CryoBalloon and RF methods 

A-Fib is a Progressive Disease

It’s really remarkable that Mike could live in paroxysmal A-Fib for 18 years and not progress to Persistent or Longstanding Persistent A-Fib. In one study over half the people who developed paroxysmal A-Fib turned Persistent after only one year. Perhaps Mike’s athleticism and fitness kept his A-Fib from getting worse.

In most people, A-Fib is a progressive disease that remodels the heart and gets worse over time. To avoid this happening to you, aim to be A-Fib free as soon as you can.

For more about Mike, read his A-Fib story, Triathlete 18 years in A-Fib, on Amiodarone for eight years―then A-Fib free after ablation by Dr. Padraig O’Neill.

For more A-Fib stories to encourage and inspire you, go to Personal A-Fib Stories of Hope.

How One Reader Detects if He’s in (Silent) A-Fib

Some people have A-Fib with no obvious symptoms. This can be dangerous, lead to a stroke and, over time, to a deteriorating heart. Many of these patients do a self-check during the day to monitor for an irregular pulse. Here’s another idea from a fellow A-Fib patient.

Taking Your Pulse

After reading our article, A-Fib Self-Care Skills: How to Check Your Heartbeat and Heart Rate, our reader, Frank, wrote us about how he goes beyond just a self-check to determine if he’s in A-Fib.

“I read your self-care skills articles and wanted to comment.
I check for when I’m in A-Fib very easily. I purchased a pulse oximeter. And whenever my reading is significantly above my normal resting pulse, then I know I’m in A-Fib. I don’t believe there’s any other reason for my resting heart rate to be elevated unless I’m in atrial fib.
A good oximeter is not very expensive at all, and it may be a very useful tool for others.”

Our thanks to Frank for sharing his advice.

How Pulse Oximeters Measure Pulse Rate

Masimo‘s MightySat fingertip pulse oximeter

Pulse oximeters are easily recognized by their associated clip-type probe which is typically applied to a patient’s finger. They are lightweight and intuitive to use.

When your heart beats, it pumps blood through your body. During each heartbeat, the blood gets squeezed into capillaries, whose volume increases very slightly. Between heartbeats, the volume decreases. This change in volume affects the amount of light (such as the amount of red or infrared light) that will transmit through your finger.

Though this fluctuation is very small, it can be measured by a pulse oximeter.

Not Just for Pulse Rates but Blood Oxygen Levels, Too

Measuring your blood oxygen saturation level (SpO2) is also important for A-Fib patients, because a very low blood oxygen level puts a strain on your heart (and your brain).

Blood oxygen saturation

Using the same type of setup to measure pulse rate, an oximeter indirectly measures the amount of oxygen that is carried by your blood. By measuring the light that passes through the blood in your finger, your blood oxygen saturation level (SpO2) is calculated and expressed as a percentage.

Accuracy: The American Thoracic Society reports that the oxygen level from a pulse oximeter is reasonably accurate. The best reading is achieved when your hand is warm, relaxed, and held below the level of your heart. Most oximeters give a reading 2% over or 2% under what your saturation would be if obtained by an arterial blood gas test. (For example, if your oxygen saturation reads 92% on the pulse oximeter, it may be actually anywhere from 90 to 94%.)

Pulse Oximeters and Sleep Apnea 

Another application for a pulse oximeter. We’ve written about using a fingertip oximeter as an inexpensive way to check if you might have sleep apnea. A blood oxygen saturation level of 90% or lower means you should talk to your doctor, that you may need a sleep study. For more, see Possible Sleep Apnea? Oximeter is DIY Way to Check your Blood’s Oxygen Level

Know Your Pulse Rate and Blood Oxygen Level

Starting at about $25, an assortment of pulse oximeters are available at Amazon.com and other retailers. One CE and FDA approved unit is the Pulse Oximeter Portable Digital Oxygen Sensor with SPO2 Alarm ($23).

On a personal note: As many of our readers know, I’ve been A-Fib free for 20 years. But nonetheless I often will check my pulse using an oximeter at night before going to sleep. Just as Frank describes, it’s very easy to do.

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“Normal” Has a New Meaning for Jim After His Ablation

Before you developed Atrial Fibrillation, did you lead an active lifestyle? Has A-Fib robbed you of your energy and replaced it with fatigue? That’s what happened to Jim. After years of drug therapy that didn’t work, read how Jim recovered his active lifestyle post-ablation.

Three years after his ablation, Jim McGauley of Macclenny, FL, shared his personal A-Fib story with our A-Fib.com readers. His atrial fibrillation had been detected several years earlier but was not controlled effectively with drug therapy.

Jim underwent a catheter ablation in the summer of 2009. His procedure was performed without complications by Dr. Saumil Oza and his team at St. Vincent’s Medical Center, Bridgeport, CT.

He writes that, after a brief period of recuperation, he resumed normal activity.  In his story, After Years in A-Fib, New Energy and Improved Life, Jim shares: 

“Within a matter of days [of my ablation], I realized that “normal” had a new meaning.
I had lived with the atrial fibrillation for years, and it took the ablation and resulting corrected heart rhythm to bring about a marked surge in my energy level with less fatigue and an overall sense of “fitness”.
I have always maintained an active lifestyle, but post-ablation I was able to increase significantly my exercise regimen. I now run 2-3 miles three times a week and include modest weight training to keep my upper body toned.”
Jim McGauley, Publisher, The Baker County Press, Macclenny, FL. After failed drug therapy, now A-Fib free via catheter ablation.

Catheter Ablation Can Have Life-Altering Effects

Atrial Fibrillation patients seeking a cure and relief from their symptoms often have many questions about catheter ablation procedures. To learn more, see:

• VIDEO: When Drug Therapy Fails: Why Patients Consider Catheter Ablation (3:00 min., includes transcript)
• Treatments/Catheter Ablation
• Frequently Asked Questions: Catheter Ablation, Pulmonary Vein Isolation, CyroBalloon Ablation

About the ablation experience itself, Jim went on to share:

“The ablation itself is minimally invasive considering that it is correcting an abnormality inside the heart itself, and the recovery period was brief and generally comfortable.

I would readily recommend it… to anyone qualifying as a candidate to correct atrial fibrillation.”

―Jim McGauley, now A-Fib free after catheter ablation 

Be Proactive—Find the A-Fib Treatment Solution that Fits You Best

Advice from Patients Now Free from the Burden of Atrial Fibrillation

Joy G.

Joy Gray, Manchester, New Hampshire

“A-Fib tends to be a progressive disease, so taking an aggressive approach to treatment early on may be your best option.

Sheri Weber, Boyce, Virginia

Sheri Weber on A-fib.com

Sheri W.

“A-Fib hardly ever gets better. Be aggressive. Anger and determination led me to researching options. Find the solution that fits you best. Every case is different.
You can learn from others’ experiences, but you cannot determine what is best for your case unless you have all the facts, tests and personal goals in line.”

Michele S.

Michele Straub, Salt Lake City, Utah

“Do not take “this is as good as it gets” as an answer— do your own research about what’s possible and take a co-leadership role with your doctor.”

A-Fib Patient Stories: Learn from Others’ Experiences

Other A-Fib patients have been where you are right now. Dozens have shared their personal experience with our readers (starting with Steve Ryan’s story in 1998). Told in the first-person, many stories span years, even decades. Symptoms will vary, and treatments choices run the full gamut.

Each author tells their story to offer you hope, to encourage you, and to bolster your determination to seek a life free of A-Fib.

You can browse the many stories organized by categories such as age group, symptoms or treatment choice. Start at Personal A-Fib Stories by Subject Category.

Read how others learned to seek their A-Fib cure.


From The Top 10 List of A-Fib Patients’ Best Advice’ , a consensus of valuable advice from fellow Atrial Fibrillation patients; Chapter 12, Beat Your A-Fib: The Essential Guide to Finding Your Cure by Steve S. Ryan, PhD.

Go to Top 10 List of A-Fib Patients’ Best Advice
Please, share the advice ♥ 

After 5 Years A-Fib Free, Terry Shares “I Wish I Had Seen an EP Sooner Than I Did”

For over 15 years Terry Traver, Thousand Oaks, CA, suffered with A-Fib. At first, he’d have a 15-hour episode every three months or so. Over the years, though, his A-Fib progressed to persistent and severe to the point of being unable to work.

Sadly, during this time, he was never referred to a cardiologist (and certainly not to cardiac Electrophysiologist). Luckily, a friend put him in touch with a clinical electrophysiologist (EP). In March 2012, he had a successful catheter ablation with a touch-up ablation the following July.

Terry’s Lessons Learned

Terry Traver’s regrets

After being A-Fib free for five years, Terry shared his A-Fib story with our A-Fib.com readers. His ‘Lessons Learned’ include these two regrets:

• I would have had the ablation much sooner. No G.P. [family doctor] ever mentioned ablation as an option. I only heard about it from a friend!

• I had never heard of an electrophysiologist (EP), and wish I had seen one sooner.

Finding the Right Doctor for You

I’m still amazed when an A-Fib patient tells me their family doctor didn’t refer them to a cardiologist, and more importantly, to a cardiac Electrophysiologist.

GP, cardiologist or EP?

Consult the right type of cardiologist: Most cardiologists deal with the vascular or pumping functions of the heart (think ‘plumber’). But Atrial Fibrillation is a problem with the electrical function of your heart (think electrician).

It’s important for A-Fib patients to see a cardiac Electrophysiologist (EP)—a cardiologist who specializes in the electrical activity of the heart and in the diagnosis and treatment of heart rhythm disorders.

Educate yourself on treatment options: It’s so important for patients to educate themselves to receive the best treatment. Terry writes that in his 15 years with A-Fib, his GP never referred him to a cardiologist or an EP. Thank goodness a friend stepped in to help him.

Urgency! A-Fib is a Progressive Disease

The longer you wait, the worse A-Fib tends to get. Look at Terry’s story. His disease progressed to Persistent Atrial Fibrillation and was incapacitating.

To learn how to find the right doctor, go to our page: Finding the Right Doctor for You and Your Treatment Goals.

Part 2: Has My A-Fib Returned? 21 Day Results from My Medtronic Reveal LINQ loop recorder

In Part 1, Steve describes how during a recent medical exam, one of his doctors (not a cardiologist) detected an irregular heart beat. Steve didn’t feel any symptoms but went to see his EP who checked him over and found no A-Fib. 

But, just to be sure, his EP implanted a tiny wireless heart monitor so he can review Steve’s heart activity over time. Go here to read our first post.

21 Days of Data with my Medtronic Reveal LINQ ICM

Section of Steve’s ECG

After having worn the Medtronic Reveal LINQ loop recorder for 3 weeks, I went in to check my results with my EP, Dr. Shephal Doshi, at Pacific Heart in Santa Monica, CA. (Reports are sent wirelessly each night by the bedside transmitter.)

The monitor report was saying I was having multiple A-Fib attacks, though I didn’t feel anything. When Dr. Doshi did an EKG of me, I was in perfect sinus. He suspected the monitor or I might be producing false positives.

Steve & his CAM

I Get a 7-Day Carnation Ambulatory Monitor, Too

To check the accuracy of the LINQ monitor, he gave me a Carnation Ambulatory Monitor (CAM) to wear for a week. It’s similar to a Zio Patch, but is stuck vertically along my sternum.

For the next 7 days I should avoid immersing the device in water. I was told I could take a shower, but I am being cautious and just taking sponge baths.

I’m supposed to keep a log of when I eat meals, exercise, drink any alcohol, and include any A-Fib symptoms. If I do feel symptoms, I’m to press the button on the monitor. So far, I haven’t had any occasion to press the button. I’ll return the monitor to Dr. Doshi’s office in a week.

Monitoring the Monitor

Carnation Ambulatory Monitor

Reveal LINQ loop recorder

Since the LINQ monitor is still actively collecting data, my EP can compare the LINQ results with the results collected by the Carnation Ambulatory Monitor. Hopefully, Dr. Doshi will find no occurrences of A-Fib (just false positives).

I’ll write more when I have something to report.

Have you worn a Carnation Ambulatory Monitor? Email with your experience.

 

Atrial Fibrillation Patients: Team with Your Doctor—Be Your Own Patient Advocate

Advice from Patients Free of the Burden of Atrial Fibrillation

Charn Deol, Richmond, BC, Canada. Now A-Fib free after 23-years with Atrial Fibrillation, reflects on the doctor-patient relationship:

Personal A-Fib story by Charn Deol, BC, Canada at A-Fib.com

Charn Deol, BC, Canada

“As a patient, the relationship is somewhat like that of a child with a parent. The patient is naïve, scared, distraught and looking for a path of reassurance from the medical profession.This was not the case in this situation.

“My gut said to ‘no longer trust’ this supposed best electrophysiologist at the hospital”.

This is when “gut instincts” come into play. My gut said to ‘no longer trust’ this supposed best electrophysiologist at the hospital and search for an alternative path. (This is another cardiologist I dropped.)…

From this experience I’ve learned to obtain as much knowledge as possible of your condition. Trust your gut feelings if you feel uncomfortable with your doctor.”

Tony Hall, Evansville, IN. Now A-Fib-free: he shares about learning he had A-Fib along with his wife’s best advice:

Tony & Jill

I sat there for probably 40 minutes waiting for my A-Fib to convert back to normal sinus rhythm, but it would not. The EP agreed to release me with prescriptions for Xarelto and Metoprolol, and a non-driving restriction.

As we drive away and I sit in the passenger seat feeling like a pet heading to a kennel. Suddenly things are different. I no longer have that “healthy as a horse” attitude. …

As we drive away and I sit in the passenger seat feeling like a pet heading to a kennel.”

Learning About A-Fib. Anyway, I took the meds for a few days and read as much as I could on the internet about this condition I have now called Atrial Fibrillation.

My wife spent at least as much time as I doing her own research. We are soon better informed but in many scattered directions. 

My Wife Knew! While she was very concerned and extremely supportive, she knew that until I became my own advocate, that I would not pursue the most effective path to addressing and dealing with this condition. She was right there.

I started doing more research through the help of Steve’s book, and found comfort in the education about the variety of heart rhythm conditions, treatment options, testimonials, personal stories, etc… .”

Michele Straube, Salt Lake City, Utah, cured after 30 years in A-Fib, encourages you to be more active in your own treatment plan:

Michele S.

“Do not take ‘this is as good as it gets’ as an answer.”

“My experience with cardiologists was hit and miss. Early on I was told that they had never seen someone so young with A-Fib (at the time, I was in my mid-20’s). 

Some told me the best they could do was medicate me so I could walk from the bed to the window and back. I changed doctors.

Best advice: Do not take ‘this is as good as it gets’ as an answer—do your own research about what’s possible. Take a co-leadership role with your doctor.”

For More Personal Insights

It’s encouraging to read how someone else has dealt with their A-Fib. These A-Fib patients have been where you are right now. They tell their stories to help bolster your determination to seek a life free of A-Fib.

For more personal experiences, go to Personal A-Fib Stories of Hope and Encouragement.

Team with Your Doctor—Be Your Own Patient Advocate

Get Support: A-Fib Wreaks Havoc with Your Head as Well as Your Heart

Anxiety, fear, worry, confusion, frustration and depression, and at times, anger. Most A-Fib patients deal with one or more of these feelings. Beware: research indicates that “psychological distress” worsens the severity of A-Fib symptoms.

Advice About Stress from Patients (and a Spouse) Now Free from the Burden of A-Fib

Jay Teresi, Atlanta, GA, USA. cured after having A-Fib for over ten years:

Jay T.

“Of the entire experience, anxiety has been the greatest challenge. Don’t beat yourself up if you deal with this. Be honest with the doctors about it and get help.
And help your family to understand as they are your greatest support system.”
Kelly Teresi, wife of Jay Teresi, about coping with her husband’s A-Fib:

Kelley T.

“This disease is so far beyond what a non-A-Fib person can comprehend—many times I found myself frustrated, not understanding what was going on with Jay’s thoughts and heart. Jay’s A-Fib and the associated anxiety has left its imprint on our lives.”

Max Jussila, Shanghai, China, about the emotional impact of his A-Fib:

Max J.

“I have never been mentally so incapable…even the simplest work-related problems seemed impossible for me to handle, let alone solve.
I was only 52 years old…but mentally I was reduced to a six–year-old child with constant tantrums.”

Joe Mirretti, Gurnee, IL, a 62-Year old cyclist, about the personal A-Fib stories on A-Fib.com:

Joe M.

“Like everyone has said in their A-Fib stories, A-Fib does such a job on your head. Every time you feel something, it scares you like you’re going back into A-Fib. That’s been a mental battle.
That’s why reading those patient stories [on A-Fib.com] help.”

A-Fib Doesn’t Have to be in Your Head as Well

Don’t be ashamed to admit how A-Fib makes you feel (especially if you’re a guy). Your psyche is just as important as your physical heart. Just acknowledging you have some or all of these symptoms is a step in the right direction.

PODCAST: 15 Ways to Manage the Fear & Anxiety of Atrial FibrillationTune in to learn ways to cope. Listen as Steve Ryan and Travis Van Slooten, publisher of LivingWithAtrialFibrillation.com discuss ways to help you with the emotional component of A-Fib. (See show notes for the list of 15 tips.)

Acknowledge the Stress and Anxiety.
Seek Emotional Support. 


From The Top 10 List of A-Fib Patients’ Best Advice’ , a consensus of valuable advice from fellow Atrial Fibrillation patients; Chapter 12, Beat Your A-Fib: The Essential Guide to Finding Your Cure by Steve S. Ryan, PhD.

Go to Top 10 List of A-Fib Patients’ Best Advice
Please, share the advice ♥ 

Has My A-Fib Returned? I Get an Insertable Wireless Monitor to Find Out

Update 5 pm (see below): During a recent medical exam, one of my doctors (not a cardiologist) detected an irregular heart beat. I didn’t feel any symptoms before, during or after the appointment, so I wasn’t alarmed. But I did make an appointment with my EP.

Medtronic Reveal LINQ ICM

When I met with my EP, he took an ECG but didn’t find A-Fib (thank goodness). But, just to be sure, he recommended implanting a tiny wireless heart monitor so he can review my heart activity over time.

I Get a Reveal LINQ Insertable Cardiac Monitor

So yesterday, as an outpatient, I had a tiny cardiac monitor implanted just under the skin near my heart. The minimally invasive procedure took the doctor about 2 minutes to do. (Most of my time at the hospital was spent doing paperwork).

My doctor used the Medtronic Reveal LINQ Insertable Cardiac Monitor (ICM)—one of the world’s smallest cardiac monitors—the device is approximately one-third the size of a AAA battery.

MyCareLink transmitter

The Reveal LINQ System includes a bedside unit that collects heart rhythm data from the ICM and wirelessly sends it to my doctor every evening.

The device allows my cardiologist to continuously monitor my heart for up to 3 years.

Setup to transmit: I got it all set up and it’s working. But I don’t expect to get any feedback from my EP any time soon. I’ll publish an update when I have something to report.

My incision for the ICM

Update 5 pm: I forgot to mention that I had no pain with this procedure. They used some numbing agent on the incision area, but I’ve had no pain afterwards (it’s now about 36 hours since the insertion). No sutures. They applied a clear bandage that holds the tissue together while healing.

There’s no visible sign of the device. If I press the area I can barely feel the outline of the ICM. It’s possible this will diminish with time as the surrounding tissue encases it.

I’ll write more:  I’ll talk with my EP in a couple of weeks when he has reviewed some of the data received via the MyCareLink wireless transmitter. (I assume he has some data processing feature that will alert him before that if the readings are outside normal specs.)

VIDEO: The Insertion Procedure

An animated video (music, no narration) by Medtronic, shows how the Reveal LINQ ICM monitor is inserted through a tiny incision just under the skin near the heart. Special tools are used to make a small incision and another to hold the ICM and “plunge” it under the skin. About 2:45 min.

To enlarge video: click and start the video. At the lower right, click on the frame icon. To exit, click again.

Diet and Nutrition: ‘The China Study’ and Other Diet Plans With Dr. Joseph Mercola

After Saul Lisauskas of Encinitas, CA was diagnosed with Atrial Fibrillation, he was disappointed by doctors who offered only drug therapy with no advice about improving his symptoms through diet and nutrition. He decided to educated himself on the topic: In his A-Fib story Saul wrote:

Saul Lisauskas

“I read a few books on the subject of food and the interaction with our body. The best book was The China Study. It will give you an education about food, its sources and dangers.”

The China Study Book and its Critics

The China Study by T. Colin Campbell & Thomas M. Campbell II was first published in 2004. The book’s title comes from the China-Cornell-Oxford Project, a 20-year study that began in 1983 and was conducted jointly by the Chinese Academy of Preventive Medicine, Cornell University, and the University of Oxford.

By Campbell & Campbell II

Conflicting opinions: There has been criticism of some of the conclusions drawn in The China Study (mostly focused on data collection, collection bias and data analysis).

Publisher of Cholesterol-and-Health.com Christopher Masterjohn, PhD has written: “Only 39 of 350 pages are actually devoted to the China study…[The China Study] would be more aptly titled, A Comprehensive Case for the Vegan Diet, and the reader should be cautioned that the evidence is selected, presented, and interpreted with the goal of making that case in mind.”

The Cornell-Oxford-China Study: A Critique (Jesse and Julie Racsh Foundation) states: “After performing regression analyses, the data does not justify the indictment of all animal foods as risk factors for chronic degenerative disease.” Read the report online or download the PDF.

A Critical Look at ‘The China Study’ and Other Diet Plans: Dr. Mercola Interviews Denise Minger

Dr J. Mercola

A jam-packed, up-to-date article for those interested in improving current health problems and long-term health through diet and nutrition.

Denise Minger

Published in July 2018, natural health expert and Mercola.com founder Dr. Joseph Mercola interviewed Denise Minger, most noted for her comprehensive rebuttal of “The China Study” (The China Study: Fact or Fallacy?) some eight years ago. She’s heavily vested in the vegan versus omnivore battle, having cycled through vegetarianism and raw veganism, finally coming full circle to being an omnivore.

Topics covered in a Critical Look at ‘The China Study’ and Other Diet Plans:

• Raw Veganism Took a Toll on Health
• Debunking ‘The China Study’
• The Case for Lowering Protein Intake
• Protein Cycling
• Macronutrient Cycling — An Overlooked Component of Optimal Health
• Cyclical Ketogenic Diet Is Ideally Combined With Cyclical Fasting
• Focus on Nutrient Density
• How Minger’s Diet Has Changed Over the Years
• Critiquing the Blood Type Diet
• Awesome Omnivore
• Plant-Based Paleo
• Lifelong Learning Is Key to Staying Ahead

Go to A Critical Look at ‘The China Study’ and Other Diet Plans.

VIDEO: Highlights from Dr. Joseph Mercola’s interview with Denise Minger (2:28)


YouTube video playback controls are located in the lower right portion of the frame: closed captions,
speed/quality, watch on YouTube website and enlarge video to full frame.

Additional Resources About Diet and Nutrition

Download the full transcript of Dr. Mercola’s interview with Denise Minger. Read Debra Minger’s The China Study: Fact or Fallacy?.

Read The China Study for Free: The 2006 edition is available to read online or download.

The 2017 edition of The China Study is available at Amazon.com and other bookstores.

See my article: The Effect of Diet & Nutrition on Your A-Fib: My Top 5 Articles.

Resources for this article

• The China Project: Studying the Link Between Diet and Disease. Study room provides a general overview and introduction to the Cornell-China-Oxford project. Accessed August 7, 2018 URL: http://www.cornell.edu/video/playlist/the-china-project-studying-the-link-between-diet-and-disease

• Cornell-Oxford-China Study: A Critique. Jesse and Julie Racsh Foundation. Accessed August 7, 2018 URL: http://www.raschfoundation.org/wp-content/uploads/Cornell_Oxford_China-Study-Critique.pdf

• Masterjohn, C. The Truth About the China Study. Cholesterol and Health.com Accessed August 7, 2018 URL: http://www.cholesterol-and-health.com/China-Study.html

• Mercola, J. A Critical Look at ‘The China Study’ and Other Diet Plans. Mercola.com, July 08, 2018. URL: https://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2018/07/08/the-china-study-and-other-nutrition-plans.aspx

• Minger, D. The China Study: Fact or Fallacy? July 7, 2010. DeniseMinger.com. https://deniseminger.com/2010/07/07/the-china-study-fact-or-fallac/

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