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Dr. Douglas L. Packer, MD, FHRS, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN

"Jill and I put you and your work in our prayers every night. What you do to help people through this [A-Fib] process is really incredible."

Jill and Steve Douglas, East Troy, WI 

“I really appreciate all the information on your website as it allows me to be a better informed patient and to know what questions to ask my EP. 

Faye Spencer, Boise, ID, April 2017

“I think your site has helped a lot of patients.”

Dr. Hugh G. Calkins, MD  Johns Hopkins,
Baltimore, MD


Doctors & patients are saying about 'Beat Your A-Fib'...


"If I had [your book] 10 years ago, it would have saved me 8 years of hell.”

Roy Salmon, Patient, A-Fib Free,
Adelaide, Australia

"This book is incredibly complete and easy-to-understand for anybody. I certainly recommend it for patients who want to know more about atrial fibrillation than what they will learn from doctors...."

Pierre Jaïs, M.D. Professor of Cardiology, Haut-Lévêque Hospital, Bordeaux, France

"Dear Steve, I saw a patient this morning with your book [in hand] and highlights throughout. She loves it and finds it very useful to help her in dealing with atrial fibrillation."

Dr. Wilber Su,
Cavanaugh Heart Center, 
Phoenix, AZ

"...masterful. You managed to combine an encyclopedic compilation of information with the simplicity of presentation that enhances the delivery of the information to the reader. This is not an easy thing to do, but you have been very, very successful at it."

Ira David Levin, heart patient, 
Rome, Italy

"Within the pages of Beat Your A-Fib, Dr. Steve Ryan, PhD, provides a comprehensive guide for persons seeking to find a cure for their Atrial Fibrillation."

Walter Kerwin, MD, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA


My A-Fib RF Catheter Ablations: 1998 vs 2019

When I developed paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation in 1997, I was very symptomatic. This time, in 2019, I didn’t have any symptoms—instead my A-Fib was detected by my tiny, inserted Medtronic Reveal LINQ loop monitor/recorder.

More Differences Between 1998 and 2019

Since 1998, the treatment of A-Fib by catheter ablation has advanced by light years including 3D Mapping and ablation systems and catheter technologies.

My last ablation 21 years ago in Bordeaux, France lasted eight+ hours. This one at St. John’s Hospital in Santa Monica, CA took only 2-3 hours.

In Bordeaux, I was in the hospital for 9 days (mostly for observation, and a “touch up” second EP lab visit). In 2019, I was in and out in 12 hours.

Second Time Around: My A-Fib Catheter Ablation Prep

Steve Ryan pre-op A-Fib ablation

Pre-op: Steve with nurse inserting IV

On Thursday, August 1st, my wife, Patti, and I arrived at St. John’s around 5:30 am.

The nurses did the usual insertion of an IV port. They had trouble getting into my left arm and used the right. Then they shaved not just my groin but my chest and back too so that they could more easily attach the electrode pads for the mapping system (those pads were cold).

Then they wheeled me into the EP lab where it seemed like an army of people were waiting on me (probably around 8 people.) They were very friendly and super-efficient in their gowns and face masks.

Dr. Shephal Doshi of Pacific Heart Institute did my RF catheter ablation. (Both he and the anesthesiologist visited me in pre-op before the ablation.) Dr. Doshi has an excellent rapport with the staff and has a great sense of humor.

Out Like a Light

Before I knew it, they had a mask over my face, and I was out like a light. (Dr. Doshi said I was a “cheap date.”)

Mapping of my A-Fib heart - Steve Ryan August 2019

Mapping screen showing my A-Fib heart – the dots are the ablation lesions – notice the tight arrangement; Steve Ryan August 2019

Thanks to Dr. Doshi, we have loads of photos of my RF catheter ablation taken from the EP lab control room and some from inside the EP lab. (I intend to get an explanation of each screen from him to share with you later.)

Post-Ablation Recovery

I didn’t wake up until in the recovery room. Dr. Doshi said everything went very well. I will give you more technical details as I learn them (I don’t remember much of what he said at the time.)

He told Patti that indeed he could see the ablation lesions from my first ablation in 1998, which were around just two of my pulmonary veins (and some other areas). So, no wonder I needed a “touch-up”.

I don’t know too many details from 1998—I didn’t know to ask for the Operating Room (OR) report back then.

Post op: Dr Doshi and nurse Jamie removing Steve’s groin stitch.

To close the one catheter incision point in my right femoral vein, he used some kind of sliding figure-eight stitch that could be loosened or tightened as needed. That stitch was painful and hurt for a while. It was removed before I left the hospital.

In the recovery room I remember them bringing me a vegetable soup which tasted delicious. Patti fed me bits of a lunch of chicken salad and raw vegetables, low-fat milk and pineapple chunks.

I was discharged about 4:30pm. After a stop at the pharmacy, we were home by 6pm. Amazing compared to my first catheter ablation in 1998. In and out in under 12 hours!

Meds: Pantoprazole and Xarelto

Dr. Doshi said I have a large esophagus so he was concerned about acid reflux damage. To prevent the very rare complication Atrial Esophageal Fistula, I was given a prescription for the Proton Pump Inhibitor Pantoprazole SOD 40 mg to be taken once a day. I did have some acid reflux the first day, but none since I started taking the Pantoprazole. (For more about Atrial Esophageal Fistula , see Dr. David Keane’s AF Symposium 2014 presentation, “Complications Associated with Catheter Ablation for AF”.)

And I’m continuing to take Xarelto 20 mg (rivaroxaban) at night with a meal (I was also on it two weeks prior to my ablation).

Recovering at Home

Dr. Shephal Doshi and Steve Ryan before his A-Fib catheter ablation Aug 1 2019

My wife, Patti, drove me home that evening. I felt terrific. But that wasn’t to last.

No problems with my heart, but the next night (Friday), I developed a low-grade fever and felt very weak and unbalanced the next day. I slept a lot Saturday and felt better.

Sunday I was scheduled to be a lector at our local Catholic church. ­(I tried to get someone to sub for me but couldn’t find anyone.) I did read the scriptures for our congregation and felt fine. But went straight home after (I wouldn’t recommend this for everyone). One needs rest after an ablation.

As I write this Sunday night, I feel fine, just a bit tired. I’ll write more when I talk with Dr Doshi about my fever and after my two-week checkup.

(Visited 1 times, 3 visits today)

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