Doctors & patients are saying about 'A-Fib.com'...


"A-Fib.com is a great web site for patients, that is unequaled by anything else out there."

Dr. Douglas L. Packer, MD, FHRS, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN

"Jill and I put you and your work in our prayers every night. What you do to help people through this [A-Fib] process is really incredible."

Jill and Steve Douglas, East Troy, WI 

“I really appreciate all the information on your website as it allows me to be a better informed patient and to know what questions to ask my EP. 

Faye Spencer, Boise, ID, April 2017

“I think your site has helped a lot of patients.”

Dr. Hugh G. Calkins, MD  Johns Hopkins,
Baltimore, MD


Doctors & patients are saying about 'Beat Your A-Fib'...


"If I had [your book] 10 years ago, it would have saved me 8 years of hell.”

Roy Salmon, Patient, A-Fib Free,
Adelaide, Australia

"This book is incredibly complete and easy-to-understand for anybody. I certainly recommend it for patients who want to know more about atrial fibrillation than what they will learn from doctors...."

Pierre Jaïs, M.D. Professor of Cardiology, Haut-Lévêque Hospital, Bordeaux, France

"Dear Steve, I saw a patient this morning with your book [in hand] and highlights throughout. She loves it and finds it very useful to help her in dealing with atrial fibrillation."

Dr. Wilber Su,
Cavanaugh Heart Center, 
Phoenix, AZ

"...masterful. You managed to combine an encyclopedic compilation of information with the simplicity of presentation that enhances the delivery of the information to the reader. This is not an easy thing to do, but you have been very, very successful at it."

Ira David Levin, heart patient, 
Rome, Italy

"Within the pages of Beat Your A-Fib, Dr. Steve Ryan, PhD, provides a comprehensive guide for persons seeking to find a cure for their Atrial Fibrillation."

Walter Kerwin, MD, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA


Supplements

Supplements for a healthy heart

Magnesium Deficiency & Fatal Arrhythmias: Two Videos with Dr. Carolyn Dean

Mineral deficiencies like magnesium (Mg) can force the heart into fatal arrhythmias. Magnesium is one of the most common nutritional deficiencies. It’s chronically lacking in most diets. Almost everyone with A-Fib is magnesium deficient.

Two Videos About Magnesium Deficiency with Dr. Dean

C. Dean, MD

We have two videos in our A-Fib Video Library featuring Dr. Carolyn Dean, author of The Magnesium Miracle, talking about magnesium deficiency and calcium overload:

The Best Way to Supplement Magnesium” with Dr. Carolyn Dean. Getting nutrients through food is not always possible; discusses side effects of too much Mg and how you can tell if you have a deficiency.(3:39) Go to video.

Importance of Balancing Calcium & Magnesium”. Dr. Dean discusses the importance of balancing your intake of magnesium and calcium (2:1); the benefits of both and why you need to have both in the body; the problem of ‘calcium overload’. (2:30) Go to video.

Should You Take Magnesium Supplements?

Browse our library

As Dr. Carolyn Dean states, it’s hard to get enough magnesium from today’s food. Magnesium has been depleted from the soil by industrial scale farming. Therefore, A-Fib patients should consider taking magnesium supplements. (Note: it takes about 6 months of magnesium supplements to build up healthy level of Mg.)

For more about magnesium, see my article: Cardiovascular Benefits of Magnesium: Insights for Atrial Fibrillation Patients.

The Warfarin Myth: A Quiz About Foods and Vitamin K

Taking warfarin to manage your increased risk of clots and A-Fib stroke? Have you been told to avoid foods with vitamin K to prevent excess clotting? To separate the facts from the myths about warfarin and vitamin K, take our 5 question quiz.

A 5 Question Quiz about Warfarin and Vitamin K

1. True or False: Warfarin and vitamin K actually work against each other in your body.
True. Vitamin K helps your blood clot. Warfarin makes your blood clot more slowly. Your INR level is monitored to keep them in balance.

2. True or False: When taking warfarin, you should limit foods with high levels of vitamin K like dark, leafy greens.
False. You don’t need to avoid foods with vitamin K. The key is to consistently maintain your daily level of vitamin K.

Don’t confuse vitamin K with the K on the periodic table for potassium. One’s a vitamin, the other is a mineral.

3. True or False: Vitamin K information is not included on most packaged food nutritional labels.
True. So it’s often hard to determine the amount of vitamin K in your food.

4. True or False: To be safe, it’s better to maintain a low level of vitamin K in your diet.
False. Don’t avoid vitamin K foods. Vitamin K is an important nutrient especially for bone strength, brain function and cardiovascular health.

5. True or False: A vitamin K supplement may actually help stabilize your INR levels.
True. Some experts suggest that a low-dose vitamin K supplement (50-150 mcg/day) may help stabilize fluctuations in INR.

The Facts About Warfarin and Vitamin K

Vitamin K Finder - veggies with border at A-Fib.com

Vitamin K Finder at ptinr.com

Well, how’d you do on the quiz? Did you learn something? So, if you’re on warfarin, you now know the facts from the myths:

• You can eat dark, leafy greens rich with vitamin K
• You need to maintain a consistent intake of vitamin K
• Most nutritional labels won’t help when checking for the amount of vitamin K
• Vitamin K is important for bone strength, brain function and cardiovascular health
• A low-dose vitamin K supplement may help stabilize your INR

Misinformation Surrounding Warfarin

Prolific A-Fib blogger Dr John Mandrola (Dr. John M.), posted about misinformation surrounding warfarin patients and vitamin K. He wrote:

“I am so utterly tired of correcting this mistake….Patients on warfarin can indeed eat green vegetables; they should just eat them consistently. I have vegetarians who do beautifully on warfarin. The problem comes when people vary the weekly dose of vegetables.”

Reclaim the Benefits of Vitamin K

Safety first. When on warfarin, don’t make any changes to your vitamin K intake without first talking to your doctor.

If you and your doctor decide that you can increase your vitamin K intake, the key is to be consistent on a daily schedule. If consumption of vitamin K does affect your INR, your doctor can always adjust the warfarin dosage.

For a practical reference about foods with vitamin K, check out the online ‘Vitamin K Finder’ at the ptinr.com website.

References for this article
PTINR.com website sponsored by Alere. URL: http://www.ptinr.com/cafe-ptinr/vitamin-k-finder

Baker P, et al. Reversal of asymptomatic over-anticoagulation by orally administered vitamin K. Br J Haematol. 2006 May;133(3):331-6. URL: http://www.pubfacts.com/detail/16643436/

Dezee KJ, et al. Treatment of excessive anticoagulation with phytonadione (vitamin K): a meta-analysis. Arch Intern Med. 2006 Feb 27;166(4):391-7. URL: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16505257

Sconce E, Khan T, Mason J, et al. Patients with unstable control have a poorer dietary intake of vitamin K compared to patients with stable control of anticoagulation. Thromb Haemost. 2005 May;93(5):872-5. URL: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15886802

FAQs A-Fib Treatments: Medicines and Drug Therapies

Drug Therapies for Atrial Fibrillation, A-Fib, Afib

Drug Therapies for Atrial Fibrillation

Atrial Fibrillation patients often search for unbiased information and guidance about medicines and drug therapy treatments. These are answers to the most frequently asked questions by patients and their families. (Click on the question to jump to the answer.)

1. “I have a heart condition. Which medications are best to control my Atrial Fibrillation?” What medications work best for me?“

2. HRT: “Do you have information about Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) and if it might help or hinder my atrial fibrillation?”

3. Rate Control Drug: “I take atenolol, a beta-blocker. Will it stop my A-Fib.”

4. Antibiotics: “Which antibiotics are less liable to cause an A-Fib attack? How is Clindamycin for dental work? In the past I reacted to Azithromycin and Advil.”

Antiarrhythmic Drugs

1. “Is the “Pill-In-The-Pocket” treatment a cure for A-Fib? When should it be used?” (“Pill-In-The-Pocket” makes use of an antiarrhythmic drug such as flecainide)

2. I’ve been on amiodarone for over a year. It works for me and keeps me out of A-Fib. But I’m worried about the toxic side effects. What should I do?”

3. “Is the antiarrhythmic drug Multaq [dronedarone] safer than taking amiodarone? How does it compare to other antiarrhythmic drugs?”

4. “My doctor told me about the Tikosyn drug option that I want to consider in getting rid of my 5-month-old persistent A-Fib. That seems like something that should be discussed on your web site.”

Blood Thinners/Anticoagulants

Note: August 2015 Update: Aspirin is no longer recommended as first-line therapy to prevent A-Fib stroke.

1. “Are anticoagulants and blood thinners the same thing? How do they thin the blood?

2. Should everyone who has A-Fib be on a blood thinner like warfarin (brand name: Coumadin)?”

3. For A-Fib patients, which is the better to prevent A-Fib-related stroke—warfarin (Coumadin), a NOAC or aspirin?”

4. “I am on Coumadin (warfarin). Do I now need to avoid foods with Vitamin K which would interfere with its blood thinning effects?”

5. Are natural blood thinners for blood clot treatment as good as prescription blood thinners like warfarin?”

6. “I’m worried about having to take the blood thinner warfarin. If I cut myself, do I risk bleeding to death?“

7. “I”ve read about a new anticoagulant, edoxaban (brand names: Lixiana, Savaysa) as an alternative to warfarin (Coumadin). For A-Fib patients, how does it compare to warfarin? Should I consider edoxaban instead of the other NOACs?”

Related question: My new cardiologist wants me to switch from Pradaxa to Eliquis. if bleeding occurs, is Eliquis safer, easier to deal with?

Post-Procedure

1. I’ve had a successful catheter ablation and am no longer in A-Fib. But my doctor says I need to be on a blood thinner. I’ve been told that, even after a successful catheter ablation, I could still have “silent” A-Fib—A-Fib episodes that I’m not aware of. Is there anything I can do to get off of blood thinners?“

2. “I just had an Electrical Cardioversion. My doctor wants me to stay on Coumadin for at least one month. Why is that required? They mentioned something about a “stunned atrium.” What is that?“

A-Fib Stroke Risk

1. “What are my chances of getting an A-Fib stroke?

2. “The A-Fib.com web site claims that an A-Fib stroke is often worse than other causes of stroke. Why is that? If a clot causes a stroke, what difference does it make if it comes from A-Fib or other causes? Isn’t the damage the same?“

3. “How long do I have to be in A-Fib before I develop a clot and have a stroke?

4. Are there alternatives to taking anticoagulants? My heart doctor wants me to take Xarelto. I am concerned about the side effects which can involve death. What else can I do?”

Related question: Is there a way to get off blood thinners all together? I hate taking Coumadin. I know I’m at risk of an A-Fib stroke.”

5. “I’ve heard of people with A-Fib on anticoagulants who still had a stroke. What can I do to make sure I never have a stroke?

If you find any errors on this page, email us. Y Last updated: Tuesday, April 20, 2021
Return to Frequently Asked Questions

Memorial Sloan Kettering’s App of Herbs, Vitamins, and Dietary Supplements

Determining whether herbs, vitamins, and other over-the-counter dietary supplements can be helpful or harmful to you can be challenging.

Our favorite resource is the About Herbs database at the Memorial Sloan Kettering (MSK) website.

Web-based ‘About Herbs’ app

The database is continually updated and managed by a pharmacist and a botanicals expert with assistance from other MSK Integrative Medicine Service experts.

You can search by product or by medical condition to find objective and evidence-based information about:

• traditional and proven uses
• potential benefits
• possible adverse effects
• interactions with other herbs or medicines

Download App or Use Web Version

iTunes Store

Use the web-based service, or the About Herbs app that’s compatible with iPad, iPhone, and iPod Touch devices and other mobile devices.

Download the free About Herbs app from the iTunes App Store or

Or go to the web-based version.

Your Doctor Needs to Know

If you are using a dietary supplement, keep your doctor or other healthcare professional informed. Why? The active ingredient in the product could interact with—increase or lessen—the effect of other medicines you’re taking.

A ‘Magic Pill’ to Improve Your Chances of a Long, Healthy Life

It’s not a pill, nor a medication. Magnesium is the ‘magic’ pill that improves by 34% your chances of living a long, healthy life—a mineral naturally present in many foods. Magnesium is important for anyone with a high cardiovascular risk (including patients with Atrial Fibrillation).

Insights come from researchers in Spain who carefully monitored the diets of 7,216 men and women between the ages of 55-80 (an age range more likely to develop A-Fib). Mg 200 pix sq at 96 resThe people in the highest third of magnesium intake (442 mg/day) were 34% less likely to have died from any cause over a five-year period. And they had a 59% reduced risk of cardiovascular mortality, plus a 37% reduction in cancer mortality.

Why was the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) lowered by ingesting more magnesium? …Continue reading…

Taking Supplements? How to Time Your Daily Doses

Updated November, 10, 2016

If you take several supplements (like I do), you may wonder:

Should I take them at the same time each day? Or should I spread doses throughout the day? Should I take with meals? Or on an empty stomach?”

The best answer may depend on whether you are taking medication, on the specific supplement and/or on your personal life style.

Medication Inventory form

Medication Inventory form

Start with the ‘Suggested Use’

Read the supplement label. Some are fairly specific, i.e., “with or without food”, or “with food” or “on an empty stomach”; or specific time (morning or bedtime) or in divided dosages. Make notes for each supplement. Download and use this FREE form to help you keep track of everything.

Do you Have Other Medical Conditions?

If you have diabetes, hypertension or heart disease, first talk to your doctor or pharmacist. Combining supplements with prescription medications, can produce unexpected or life-threatening results.

They may offer advice specific to the combinations of your meds and supplements.

Do Some Reading, Take Some Notes

The best time to take a specific vitamin or supplement may depend on the specific supplement. Do some reading on each at the library or at a reputable website or two. Make notes of the information you find. A few examples:

• Taking a single dose multi-vitamin? It’s best to take it in the morning when nutrients are depleted and with or near breakfast so it’s broken down, then digested with the food.
• Vitamin D is best absorbed after your biggest meal, usually dinner, averaging 56 percent greater boost than those who take it without food.
• Calcium supplement, don’t take along with a multivitamin containing iron. The calcium may interfere with the iron’s absorption.
• Magnesium may be best taken in the evening, since Magnesium may support sound sleep.

Healthy Directions, Dr. David Williams

On the website Healthy Directions, Dr. David Williams offers advice about the best times to take vitamins. He lists specific vitamins and supplements and organized them into three groups, those that should be taken before meals, with meals, or in-between meals. See his article for specifics, The Best Times to Take Your Vitamins

[Healthy Directions offers advanced nutritional supplements and guidance from highly respected integrative and alternative health doctors including Julian Whitaker, MDDr. David WilliamsDr. Stephen Sinatra, MD and others.]

My favorite independent research sites

For reliable, unbiased research and information on specific vitamins and supplements, we recommend these three sites (in order or preference). None of the three sell supplements (or anything else). They just offer information on vitamins, herbs, natural products and supplements.

memorial-sloan-kettering-cancer-center-logo1. Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Institute/Integrative Medicine: “About Herbs, Botanicals & Other Products
2. Drugs.com: ‘MedFacts Natural Products Professional database
3. The ‘Dietary Supplement Label Database’ at the U.S. National Institutes of Health.

Adjust for Your Life Style

You may need to adjust your supplement taking to accommodate work or school demands, family schedules, etc. For example, if you work the swing shift, your “morning” dose may need to be 1 pm, and your ‘evening’ doze may need to be at 2 am.

Or, if you often skip meals during your work day, taking equally divided doses may become erratic. So, it may be better taking your doses before you go to work.

EZY Dose-4-times a day organizer - A-Fib.com

EZY Dose-4-times a day organizer

Bottom Line: Try to be Consistent

For optimum benefit, it may take some effort to work up your supplement schedule. But you don’t have to obsess about it. Since these are ‘natural’ substances (vs. prescription drugs), you usually don’t have to be overly careful about when you take them. What’s important is do try to be consistent from day to day.

After you work out your schedule, consider using a vitamin/supplement organizer. Check out My Search for the Best 7-Day Medicine/Vitamin Organizer.

For more answers to your questions about mineral deficiencies, see our: FAQ Minerals & Supplements

For more on where to research specific vitamins and supplements see, FAQ Minerals Deficiencies: Reliable Research.

Can You Suppress Your PVCs and PACs?

Are you one of the many A-Fib patients who also have PACs and PVCs (ectopics)? Are your PACs more than just annoying? Do your PACs become more frequent and trigger an A-Fib attack?

Perhaps you’re thinking if you reduce these extra beats and palpitations, you may be able to reduce your A-Fib episodes. So, what can you do?

PAC and PVC stands for Premature Ventricle Contractions and Premature Atrial Contractions.

Catheter Ablation Option

In extreme cases where the extra beats are very disturbing and damage one’s quality of life, Electrophysiologists (EPs) can perform an ablation for them similar to an ablation for A-Fib. But this is a specialized procedure that not all EPs perform or are willing to perform.

Suppress PACs and PVCs with the “Awesome Foursome” Cocktail

Dr. Stephen T. Sinatra in his book, The Sinatra Solution—Metabolic Cardiology, recommends the following natural “cocktail” for suppressing PACs and PVCs, what he calls the “awesome foursome”:

L-carnitine: A derivative of the amino acid lysine which helps to turn fat into energy. It promotes energy metabolism and enhances cardiac function. Some consider it the single most important nutrient in cardiac health. It reduces PVCs.

Dosage: Daily: 750-2000 mg of L-Carnitine Fumerate (250 to 500 mg three to four times a day).

Coenzyme Q10 (Ubiquinone): A naturally occurring enzyme, part of the quinone chemical group, that is found in every cell in the body. It produces energy in the mitochondria and energizes the heart. 95% of the body’s energy is generated by CoQ10, which generates energy in the form of ATP. It prolongs the action potential and helps maintain sinus rhythm. It improves heart rhythm problems.

Dosage: 100-300 mg daily in divided doses with meals.

D-ribose: A five-carbon sugar that is a regulator in the production of ATP. The only compound used by the body to replenish depleted energy stores. Ribose increases tolerance to cardiac stress, improves exercise tolerance and physical function, provides cardiac energy needed to maintain normal heart function, increases cardiac efficiency, lowers stress during exercise, and maintains healthy energy levels in heart and muscle.

Dosage: Daily: 7-10 grams of Ribose powder. Take in divided doses with meals or just before and after exercise.

Magnesium: A vital mineral used by the enzymes that make energy synthesis and recycling possible. Adequate intracellular magnesium is essential to normal tissue and organ function. Low magnesium is associated with cardiac abnormalities, fibrillation, and vascular and muscle spasms, and is seen in cardiac failure.

Dosage: A recommended goal is a minimum 600 mg/day, preferably 800 mg. (For example, 200mg three times a day and 200 mg at bedtime.)

To Learn More About PACs and PVCs

Read the research in my article, Premature Atrial Contractions (PACs) Predict A-Fib.
Read John’s personal A-Fib story, PVC-Free After Successful Ablation at Mayo Clinic.

The Sinatra Solution: Metabolic Cardiology by Stephen Sinatra, MD

Get yours at Amazon.com

Dr. Sinatra’s Book on Amazon.com

Use our A-Fib.com portal link to Amazon.com to get your copy of Dr. Stephen T. Sinatra book, The Sinatra Solution—Metabolic Cardiology.

When you use the A-Fib.com Amazon.com link, we receive a small commission on each sale, at no extra cost to you. We apply it toward the monthly publishing costs of this website. Bookmark this link and use every time you go to Amazon.com.

My Search for the Best 7-Day Medicine/Vitamin Organizer

By Patti J. Ryan

Do you struggle with the daily mix of supplements and prescriptions you take? Some are small, but some are horse-pill size! Some you take in the AM, others you take in the PM.

Trying to find the right pill organizer has been a trial for me. Most often the compartments are too small and hard to open.

EZ Dose 7-Day AM/PM organizer at A-Fib.com

EZ Dose 7-Day AM/PM organizer with push-button lids

I Found the Best Organizer

After years of trial and effort, I’ve FINALLY found a great pill organizer―the EZY Dose AM/PM 7-Day Push Button organizer.

This 7-day organizer has two rows for AM/PM dosages with large letters for the days of the week.

Compartments are extra large―about 1 1/8″ wide by 1 3/8″ deep. That’s large enough for those ‘horse pill’ size tablets. The compartments have rounded bottoms― making it effortless to get the pills out. And the cherry on top? Push button lids―easy open and easy close.

EZY Dose - 4-times a day organizer

EZY Dose – 4-times a day organizer

Do you carry your meds with you? The EZY Dose is also compact and portable for carrying in your purse or jacket pocket.

Note: If you take pills four times a day, there’s an EZY Dose for you too: 7-Day XL Medtime Planner

Use our Link to Amazon.com and Support A-Fib.com

For my needs, I bought two 7-Day EZY Dose organizers from Amazon.com, so I’m set for two weeks at fill up time.

amazon_logo white square

Use our Amazon.com portal link: Here’s a link to get two EZY Dose AM/PM 7-Day Push Button organizers and Free Amazon Prime shipping. (Purchases through our portal link helps support A-Fib.com―at no extra cost to you!)

The EZY Dose AM/PM 7-Day organizer is also available from other retail and online sources.

Is the Supplement BCAA+G a Natural Remedy for Atrial Fibrillation?

In his personal A-Fib.com story, Tom Lisak wrote that his A-Fib disappeared after taking the supplement combination BCAA+G twice a day.

BCAA+G supplement - a natural cure for A-Fib? at A-Fib.com

The heart muscle will suffer if BCAA-deficient

Personally, I take BCAA+G after running and after working out at the gym. (For recommended products: see ‘BCAA+G’ under ‘Natural’ Supplements for a Healthy Heart.)

Branched Chain Amino Acids coupled with L-Glutamine (BCAA+G) helps builds muscle. Athletes and weight lifters use BCAA+G to improve exercise performance and decrease post-exercise soreness and recovery time.

Our body doesn’t naturally manufacture Branched Chain Amino Acids. They’re essential nutrients that the body obtains from proteins found in food. All of your muscles, including your heart, could suffer if you are BCAA-deficient. Continue reading...

My Top 7 Picks: Natural Supplements for a Healthy Heart

By Steve S. Ryan, PhD

While not considered “A-Fib specific” like your medications, these minerals and supplements may improve overall heart health and thereby help your Atrial Fibrillation.

Recommendations for Heart Health

For a detailed discussion of these minerals and supplements along with recommended dosages, see our article, ‘Natural’ Supplements for a Healthy Heart. Our seven recommendations are:

For a detailed discussion of these seven nutritional supplements, see our article ‘Natural’ Supplements for a Healthy Heart.

• Taurine
• Coenzyme Q10
• L-Carnitine
• Omega-3 Fish Oils
• Ribose (D-Ribose)
• Hawthorne Berry
• BCAA+G

Many Sources and My Amazon.com List

These minerals and supplements are available from many reputable retail and online sources. To make shopping easy for you, see my ‘Wish List’ on Amazon.com. (Note: Use any of these Amazon portal links, and your purchases help support A-Fib.com.)  

To get you started choosing brands, tablet size and forms of each supplement, we offer you 2 brands that meets our requirements.

1.  41A5986BbLL._SL500_SL135_Taurine, 1000 Mg

Taurine, along with Magnesium and Potassium, have been described as “the essential trio” for treating nutritional deficiencies relating to A-Fib. Taurine protects potassium levels inside the heart, regulates cellular calcium, and improves heart muscle contraction. Suggested products:

Now Foods Taurine 1000Mg, 100-Capsules; Source Naturals Taurine 1000mg, 240 Capsules

2. Ubiquinol CoQ10 (coenzyme) 100 Mg

Coenzyme’s ability to energize the heart is perhaps its chief attribute; improves heart functions and heart rhythm problems. Coenzyme is a naturally occurring enzyme and plays a key role in producing energy in the mitochondria. “Ubiquinol” is a more readily absorbed form.

Source Naturals Ubiquinol CoQ10 100mg, 90 Softgels; Jarrow Formulas Ubiquinol QH-Absorb, High Absorption/Enhanced Stability, 100 mg, 120 Softgels

3. GPL-Carnitine dosage: 500 -1000 Mg41pGdDbehjL._SL500_SL135_

L-Carnitine is a vitamin-like nutrient; a derivative of the amino acid lysine which helps to turn fat into energy. Considered by some to be the single most important nutrient in cardiac health. It reduces the incidence of cardiac arrhythmias and premature ventricular contractions (PVCs).

Swanson Glycine Propionyl-L-Carnitine Hcl Gplc 840 mg 60 CapsVitacost GPLC Glycine Propionyl L-Carnitine HCl-GlycoCarn 1000 mg PLC per serving – 60 Capsules

4. Omega 3 Fish Oil 1000 Mg 41XsPG8LBGL._SL500_SL135_

Essential fatty acids like EPA and DHA are considered by some to be natural defibrillators, lessening the incidence of cardiac arrhythmias and A-Fib. Krill Fish Oil 1000 Mg; Essential Fatty Acids (EPA and DHA) make blood platelets less sticky, less likely to form clots (cause of strokes). Some prefer Krill oil to fish oil as it’s exacted from organisms living in pristine deep-water seas.

Source Naturals Omega EPA Fish Oil, 1000mg, 100 SoftgelsMegaRed Extra Strength Omega 3 Krill Oil 500mg Supplement, 60 Count

5. Ribose/D-Ribose Powder 51d1BMLf-LL._SL500_SL135_41ZcLixRg3L._SL500_SL135_

Ribose increases tolerance to cardiac stress, lowers stress during exercise, and maintains healthy energy levels in heart and muscle. The heart’s ability to maintain energy is limited by one thing—-the availability of Ribose.

Now Foods D-Ribose Powder, 8-OunceDoctor’s Best Best D-Ribose Featuring Bioenergy Ribose, 250-Gram

6. Hawthorne Extract 41vl3oo6+7L._SL500_SL135_41VLGf88IyL._SL500_SL135_

Hawthorne Berry reduces tachycardias and palpitations and prevents premature ventricular contractions (PVCs). Hawthorne Berry can energize the heart without prompting arrhythmias. It has a normalizing effect upon the heartbeat. Dosage 300 to 510 Mg

Now Foods Hawthorn Extractract 300mg, Veg-capsules, 90-CountNature’s Way Hawthorn Berries , 510 mg., 180 Veg-capsules

7. 512+5YkmiCL._SL500_SL135_BCAA with L-Glutamine, 1000 Mg

‘Branched Chain Amino Acids’ (BCAA) are critical to the repair and maintenance of strong heart muscle and function. Be sure to get BCCA in combination with L-Glutamine (though challenging to find). We like the powder form. Suggested products:

MRM BCAA+G, Lemonade, 35.2-Ounce (1000g) Plastic JarBodyTech BCAA and Glutamine (13.8 Oz Powder)

Note: Mineral supplements may interfere or interact with your prescription medications, so always consult your doctor before adding any supplements to your treatment plan.

Many Physicians are Not Well Versed in Nutritional Support

Always discuss with your doctor before adding supplements - A-Fib.com

Always discuss with your doctor

Don’t expect a lot of support from your doctor. Unfortunately, a great number of doctors are not well versed in recommending or supervising nutritional support. Quite often, they may dismiss your inquiries about nutritional supplements. 

You may need to work with (or educate) your doctor to determine the benefit of supplements for your A-Fib health.

Learn about Mineral Deficiencies and Atrial Fibrillation

For an extensive discussion about mineral deficiencies, see our Treatments page: Minerals Deficiencies.

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