Doctors & patients are saying about 'A-Fib.com'...


"A-Fib.com is a great web site for patients, that is unequaled by anything else out there."

Dr. Douglas L. Packer, MD, FHRS, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN

"Jill and I put you and your work in our prayers every night. What you do to help people through this [A-Fib] process is really incredible."

Jill and Steve Douglas, East Troy, WI 

“I really appreciate all the information on your website as it allows me to be a better informed patient and to know what questions to ask my EP. 

Faye Spencer, Boise, ID, April 2017

“I think your site has helped a lot of patients.”

Dr. Hugh G. Calkins, MD  Johns Hopkins,
Baltimore, MD


Doctors & patients are saying about 'Beat Your A-Fib'...


"If I had [your book] 10 years ago, it would have saved me 8 years of hell.”

Roy Salmon, Patient, A-Fib Free,
Adelaide, Australia

"This book is incredibly complete and easy-to-understand for anybody. I certainly recommend it for patients who want to know more about atrial fibrillation than what they will learn from doctors...."

Pierre Jaïs, M.D. Professor of Cardiology, Haut-Lévêque Hospital, Bordeaux, France

"Dear Steve, I saw a patient this morning with your book [in hand] and highlights throughout. She loves it and finds it very useful to help her in dealing with atrial fibrillation."

Dr. Wilber Su,
Cavanaugh Heart Center, 
Phoenix, AZ

"...masterful. You managed to combine an encyclopedic compilation of information with the simplicity of presentation that enhances the delivery of the information to the reader. This is not an easy thing to do, but you have been very, very successful at it."

Ira David Levin, heart patient, 
Rome, Italy

"Within the pages of Beat Your A-Fib, Dr. Steve Ryan, PhD, provides a comprehensive guide for persons seeking to find a cure for their Atrial Fibrillation."

Walter Kerwin, MD, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA


Supplements

Supplements for a healthy heart

My Top 5 Picks: When You’re Deficient in Magnesium & Potassium

Last updated: January 28, 2019

A deficiency in Magnesium and Potassium can force the heart into fatal arrhythmias. Most A-Fib patients are lacking in both minerals.

Magnesium & Potassium Deficiencies are Common

Magnesium (Mg) is needed for proper muscle, nerve, and enzyme function. Lacking in most diets, it’s often necessary to take a magnesium supplement over several months to restore levels.

A-Fib patients are often deficient in Potassium (K), as well In fact, a deficiency of magnesium can lead to potassium depletion. Potassium is essential for normal nerve impulses and muscle function and maintaining normal cardiac function.

A Wish List: My Top 5 Recommendations

These are the Mg and K products I recommend (and use) along with a great book on magnesium. I’ve also added two Bonus Videos. These products are available from many online sources. You can see this ‘Wish List’ on Amazon.com. (Note: Use our Amazon portal link, and your purchases help support A-Fib.com.) For recommended dosages, go to Treatments/Mineral Deficiencies.

 Magnesium Mg Drs Best1. Doctor’s Best High Absorption Magnesium

(200 Mg Elemental) 240-Count tablets. One form of easily absorbed magnesium is Magnesium glycinate a chelated amino acid. Look for the label ‘Albion Minerals.’ This is a patented process designed to limit bowel sensitivity.

 Potassium NOW bottle2. Now Foods Potassium Gluconate Pure Powder, 1-pound

Just like magnesium deficiency, A-Fib patients are usually deficient in Potassium as well. We recommend the powder in order to take the recommended 1600-2400mg/day. (Be cautious of tablets that list ‘540mg’ but only contain 99mg of Potassium.)

 Ancient Minerals Magnesium Oil3. Ancient Minerals Magnesium Oil, 8 oz.

If oral magnesium causes bowel sensitivity (loose stools), an alternative is magnesium oil which bypasses the gastrointestinal tract. Spray on the skin and massage in. After 20-30 minutes, you can wipe off any powder residue (salt) or just jump in the shower! Eight sprays delivers approximately 100 mg of magnesium to the skin.

(Tip: To help with muscle ticks, my wife applies 5-6 sprays of magnesium oil to each leg before bed.)

 4. Ancient Minerals Magnesium Chloride Bath Flakes in bulk

Similar to Epsom salts (Magnesium sulfate), the molecular structure of Magnesium Chloride is different and is much more easily absorbed into the body. Soak for 20-30 minutes in a bath with 2 cups of bath flakes. Can be used in conjunction with magnesium tablets. Any brand will do.

 The Magnesium Miracle book cover5. The Magnesium Miracle by Carolyn Dean

Comprehensive book on the importance and helpful benefits of magnesium as well as just what a magnesium deficiency causes. Easy to read with organized sections with dosing recommendations. Best seller on Amazon.com with over 600 reviews.

Dr. Carolyn DeanVIDEO BONUS:

From our A-Fib video library, two short videos with Carolyn Dean, the author of The Magnesium Miracle:

1.      The Best Way to Take Magnesium and
2.      The Importance of Balancing Calcium and Magnesium.

Learn More about Mineral Deficiencies

To read more about mineral deficiencies and how to use these products and recommended dosages, go to Treatments section on Mineral Deficiencies.

Caution: Consult with your doctor before adding any supplements to your treatment plan.

Got A-Fib? You're not Alone. Check our list of online discussion groups

References for this article
Mineral Deficiencies. A-Fib.com https://a-fib.com/treatments-for-atrial-fibrillation/mineral-deficiencies/

Knox, Kerri. FACT (moderator@gordonresearch.com). Atrial Fibrillation responses. A2: http://www.easy-immune-health.com/atrial-fibrillation-cause.html

Berkelhammer, C, Baer, RA “A clinical approach to common electrolyte problems:*4. Hypomagnesemia” http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1345822

Burgess, Jackie. “The Strategy – What Metabolic Cardiology Means to Afibbers,” July 2010, P.5. http://www.afibbers.org/resources/magnesiumabsorption.pdf

If you find any errors on this page, email us. Y Last updated: Monday, January 28, 2019

Back to: Treatments/Mineral Deficiencies

Can I Take the Supplement Krill Oil While on Eliquis?

We’ve added a new FAQ and answer to our section, Mineral Deficiencies & Supplements:

“I’m taking Eliquis for my risk of A-Fib stroke. I’m interested in the supplement, Krill Oil, that has natural blood thinning properties. Is It OK to take Krill Oil along with Eliquis?

Krill Oil and Eliquis Work Differently

The supplement, Krill Oil, is similar to fish oil. Both contain omega-3 fatty acids. Fatty acids are thought to make blood platelets less sticky, and thus are less likely to form clots. Krill Oil is considered superior to fish oil for not accumulating toxins the same way fish do.

Eliquis is an anticoagulant, a ‘Direct Factor Xa Inhibitor’, and affects only one stage in the anticoagulation process (the stage after platelets do their part). It works to slow or stop clotting proteins (like fibrin) from binding together and forming a clot.

Continue reading my answer

How Blood Clotting Works: First, platelets clump together to temporarily ‘plug’ the wound; Next, a cascade of coagulation stages reinforces the plug with fibrin threads that act as a ‘molecular glue’ during healing.

FAQs Minerals & Supplements: Can I Take Krill Oil with Eliquis?

 FAQs Minerals & Supplements: Krill Oil

Minerals & Supplements

Minerals & Supplements

“I’m interested in the supplement, Krill Oil, that has natural blood thinning properties. I’m taking Eliquis for my risk of A-Fib stroke. Is It OK to take Krill Oil along with Eliquis?”

I wish I had a more definitive answer for you. Here’s what we know.

Krill Oil and Eliquis Work Differently

The supplement, Krill Oil, is similar to fish oil. Both contain omega-3 fatty acids. Fatty acids are thought to make blood platelets less sticky, and thus are less likely to form clots. Krill Oil is considered superior to fish oil for not accumulating toxins the same way fish do.

How Blood Clotting Works: First, platelets clump together to temporarily ‘plug’ the wound; Next, a cascade of coagulation stages reinforces the plug with fibrin threads that act as a ‘molecular glue’ during healing.
Eliquis is an anticoagulant, a ‘Direct Factor Xa Inhibitor’, and affects only one stage in the anticoagulation process (the stage after platelets do their part). It works to slow or stop clotting proteins (like fibrin) from binding together and forming a clot.

Eliquis: No Method to Measure Anticoagulant Effect

The anticoagulant, warfarin, has ‘one’ but Eliquis doesn’t. The effectiveness of warfarin can be determined by blood tests measuring INR levels. By comparison, there’s no method to measure Eliquis’ anticoagulant effect (or any of the new NOACs).

Unlike warfarin, there’s no method to measure Eliquis’ anticoagulant effect.

Antiplatelets vs Anticoagulants

We know that Krill Oil and Eliquis work differently. Krill Oil affects the clumping of blood platelets. Eliquis (and all NOACs) affect the anticoagulant process.

Intuitively one would think that since Eliquis and Krill Oil affect different stages in the anticoagulant process, it might be OK to use them together. But Eliquis is so new we have little research to definitively say this.

Bottom line: We can’t measure how Krill Oil affects the anticoagulation process when taking Eliquis.

Discuss with your Doctors

Ask your doctors about taking Krill Oil along with Eliquis (but they probably won’t know the answer). Most doctors consider nutritional supplements, like Krill Oil, of dubious value and little more than ‘snake oil’. (But this is changing in today’s medical schools.)

Most doctors consider nutritional supplements of dubious value and little more than ‘snake oil’.

If you and your doctor agree to start Krill Oil, begin with a low dosage, then increase it gradually.

IMPORTANT: Keep accurate, scrupulous records of how you react to taking Krill Oil with Eliquis. Be prepared to stop the Krill Oil, if necessary.

(Thanks, Ralph, for this question. Please share your experience with us.)

References for this article
10-Step Process of Blood Coagulation. Thrombocyte.com.

10-Step Process of Blood Coagulation

Best Natural Blood Thinner. Healthline website. Medically Reviewed by Mark R Laflamme, MD on January 20, 2016. http://www.healthline.com/health/high-blood-pressure/best-natural-blood-thinners#Overview1

Return to: FAQ Minerals & Supplements
Last updated: Monday, June 18, 2018

Success with Dr. Dean’s Liquid Magnesium Supplement ‘ReMag’

Dianne T. from Mesquite, Nevada, wrote me about how magnesium supplementation has mostly eliminated her A-Fib symptoms and restored her to normal sinus rhythm (NSR). She recommends liquid magnesium:

“I was diagnosed with A-Fib about 18 months ago, but as it turned out, I have PAC’s.  Of course I was told that these PACs will eventually turn into A-Fib. But I believe that irregular heartbeats, even A-Fib, can often be caused by a magnesium deficiency. After about a year on ReMag, my heart is mostly in NSR. It works!
Diane T. and Magnesium Deficiency at A-Fib.com

Dianne T.

Dr. Carolyn Dean has written an eBook about A-Fib and the magnesium connection: Atrial Fibrillation: Remineralize Your Heart [July 2015]. The good thing about her liquid magnesium product, REMAG™, is that you can take a therapeutic dose without the laxative effect. I was taking 900 mg daily but now I need less. I take about 600-750 daily.
I have heard many testimonials from others suffering from A-Fib and other arrhythmia disorders who have had the same experience as I have had. But it does take time. It took me about 6-8 months before I really noticed a big difference. It doesn’t work over night, and it can get complicated when taking meds. I wasn’t on any meds, so I didn’t have that issue.”

I’m thankful to Dianne for sharing her A-Fib success story of replenishing her Magnesium levels. Magnesium is useful for many muscle-related ailments and has rightfully been called the ‘miracle’ supplement.

Considering a Magnesium Supplement?

While Dianne is using Dr. Dean’s Remag product (about $18/month), I recommend you first try these less costly magnesium supplements. I take and recommend:

What's working for you? Share your tips at A-Fib.com

Email us what’s working for you.

Doctor’s Best High Absorption Magnesium (200 Mg Elemental), 240-Count (2-4 tablets a day). On Amazon.com that’s $13.84 for a 2–4 month supply (includes Free shipping for Prime Members). About $3.50 to $7 a month.

If sensitive to the laxative effect of Magnesium, I recommend:

Magnesium oil; Spray and rub into the skin; examples: Ancient Minerals Magnesium Oil and Life-flo Pure Magnesium Oil; 8 oz spray bottle lasts about 4 months. About: $2 to $4 a month.

Epson salt (magnesium sulfate); Any brand in bulk. $1.50 to $4.50 a pound. Less than $1 a bath. Dissolve 1 to 3 cups (or three handfuls) in full tub bath and soak for 30 minutes.

These Magnesium products can be used in tandem to maximize your Mg absorption. Read more about Atrial Fibrillation and Mineral Deficiencies in our Treatments section.

Be patient when supplementing Magnesium. It takes three to six months, or more, to replenish your depleted levels of Magnesium.

‘Doctor Health’ Radio: A-Fib Patients & Common Mineral Deficiencies

INTERVIEW: Dr David Snow, host of Doctor Health Radio, talks with Steve S. Ryan, PhD, publisher of A-Fib.com, about magnesium and potassium deficiencies, both common among A-Fib patients; how ‘calcium overload’ can actually bring on Atrial Fibrillation; other supplements to promote a healthy heart; and a few warnings for A-Fib patients.

See our library of videos about Atrial Fibrillation

Video Format: radio interview with lower third graphic titles.
Length: 5:27 min. Click to listen in.

VIDEO LIBRARY: We have loads of A-Fib-related videos in our Video Library. For the reader who learns visually through motion graphics, audio, and personal interviews, these videos are organized loosely into three levels: introductory/basic, intermediate and in-depth/advanced.

See our video library for more videos featuring Steve S. Ryan, PhD.

Taking Warfarin? The Myth about Foods with Vitamin K

Are you taking the blood thinner warfarin to manage your risk of clots and A-Fib stroke? Have you been told to avoid foods with vitamin K to prevent excess clotting? Want to know the facts about warfarin and vitamin K? Take our 5 question quiz to separate the facts from the myths.

A 5 Question Quiz about Warfarin and Vitamin K

1. True or False: Warfarin and vitamin K actually work against each other in your body.
True. Vitamin K helps your blood clot. Warfarin makes your blood clot more slowly. Your INR level is monitored to keep them in balance.

2. True or False: When taking warfarin, you should limit foods with high levels of vitamin K like dark, leafy greens.
False. You don’t need to avoid foods with vitamin K. The key is to consistently maintain your daily level of vitamin K.

Don’t confuse vitamin K with the K on the periodic table for potassium. One’s a vitamin, the other is a mineral.

3. True or False: Vitamin K information is not included on most packaged food nutritional labels.
True. So it’s often hard to determine the amount of vitamin K in your food.

… Continue with the quiz…->

Our Top 3 Sources for Reliable, Unbiased Info on Vitamins and Supplements

Interested in ‘natural’ ways to treatment your A-Fib symptoms? Are you researching minerals and supplements? You aren’t alone. An A-Fib.com reader wrote us:

“Where can I find reliable, unbiased research and information on specific vitamins and supplements? (I want an independent resource, not some site trying to sell me their products.)”

We agree that the most reliable information is from unbiased sites—often the best are non-commercial sites.

Drugs.com MedFacts Natural Products menu

Drugs.com MedFacts Natural Products menu

In our search for unbiased sources, we looked at many, many informational directories. Three searchable databases rose to the top of our list. In order of preference, here are our favorites:

1. Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Institute/Integrative Medicine: ‘About Herbs, Botanicals & Other Products’
2. Drugs.com: ‘MedFacts Natural Products Professional database’
3. The ‘Dietary Supplement Label Database’ at the U.S. National Institutes of Health.

To read our complete report with links to each database, go to FAQ Minerals Deficiencies: Reliable Research.

If you find other useful resources, send us an email and we’ll share them with our readers.

Videos: Dr. Carolyn Dean Discusses Magnesium Deficiency

Video: Importance of Balancing Calcium & Magnesium Dr. Carolyn Dean.

Video: Importance of Balancing Calcium & Magnesium Dr. Carolyn Dean.

Magnesium information for A-Fib patients. We’ve two videos to our A-Fib Video Library featuring Dr. Carolyn Dean, author of The Magnesium Miracle, talking about magnesium deficiency and calcium overload:

The Best Way to Supplement Magnesium” with Dr. Carolyn Dean. Getting nutrients through food is not always possible; discusses side effects of too much Mg and how you can tell if you have a deficiency.(3:39) Go to video. From iHealthTube.com.

Importance of Balancing Calcium & Magnesium”. Dr. Dean discusses the importance of balancing your intake of magnesium and calcium (2:1); the benefits of both and why you need to have both in the body; the problem of ‘calcium overload’. (2:30) Go to video. From iHealthTube.com.

Anyone in A-Fib is Almost Certainly Magnesium Deficient

Anyone in A-Fib Mg deficient - Lighter poster - 400 pix wide at 300 resWhy? Magnesium used to be plentiful in fruits, vegetable and grains, but decades of industrial-scale farming have stripped the soil of minerals like magnesium.

One study found that the nutrient content of crops has declined by as much as 40% since the 1950s. “It’s now is almost impossible to get adequate amounts of magnesium from food.”

At least 80% of Americans are deficient in magnesium consuming only about 270 mg of magnesium a day. While the Recommended Daily Allowance is 420 mg for adult males and 320 mg for adult females. (The RDAs is the minimum amount for a healthy person, not the recommended amount.)

Anyone in A-Fib is almost certainly magnesium deficient with a substantial cumulative deficiency over months and years.

To learn more about Magnesium, go to our Mineral Deficiencies page. If considering a supplement, read: Low Serum Magnesium Linked with A-Fib, by Lynn Haye; and Natural’ Supplements for a Healthy Heart.

References for this Article
Goodman, Dennis. This Mineral Prevents Headaches, Heart Disease, More. Bottom Line Personal. Volume 35, Number 2, January 15, 2014.

Reassuring: No Deaths from Vitamin Supplements. Absolutely None.

During my resent research, I found this press release and report about the safety of minerals and vitamin supplements.

31 Years of Supplement Safety Once Again Confirmed by America’s Largest Database

by Andrew W. Saul, Editor

(OMNS Jan 14, 2015) There were no deaths whatsoever from vitamins in the year 2013. The 31st annual report from the American Association of Poison Control Centers shows zero deaths from multiple vitamins. And, there were no deaths whatsoever from vitamin A, niacin, vitamin B-6, any other B-vitamin, vitamin C, vitamin D, vitamin E, or any vitamin at all.

Zero deaths from vitamins. Want to bet this will never be on the evening news?

Prescription Meds Don’t Fare So Well

I wish prescription medications could claim the same excellent safety record as vitamins. Alas, in an average year, there are at least 106,000 deaths and over 450,000 adverse events reported due to prescription drugs

References for this article
Mowry JB, Spyker DA, Cantilena LR Jr, McMillan N, Ford M. 2013 Annual Report of the American Association of Poison Control Centers’ National Poison Data System (NPDS): 31st Annual Report. Clinical Toxicology (2014), 52, p 1032-1283. Free full text download at https://aapcc.s3.amazonaws.com/pdfs/annual_reports/2013_NPDS_Annual_Report.pdf ISSN: 1556-3650 print / 1556-9519 online. DOI: 10.3109/15563650.2014.987397.

Saul, A. W. No Deaths from Vitamins. Absolutely None. 31 Years of Supplement Safety Once Again Confirmed by America’s Largest Database. Orthomolecular Medicine News Service, January 14, 2015 Accessed August 7, 2015, URL: http://orthomolecular.org/resources/omns/v11n01.shtml

Inspirational Quote: Anyone in A-Fib is Almost Certainly Mg Deficient

“Anyone in A-Fib is almost certainly magnesium deficient. An imbalance or deficiency in minerals like magnesium, potassium, and calcium can force the heart into fatal arrhythmias.”

Quote by Steve S. Ryan, former A-Fib patient, from his book, Beat Your A-Fib: The Essential Guide to Finding Your Cure (BeatYourA-fib.com). A-Fib-free since 1998 after focal point catheter ablation in Bordeaux, France.

Most US adults ingest only about 270 mg of magnesium a day, well below the modest magnesium RDAs of 420 mg for adult males and 320 mg for adult females. This creates a substantial cumulative deficiency over months and years. Read more about magnesium and other minerals on our page: Mineral Deficiencies.Anyone in A-Fib Mg deficient - Lighter poster - 400 pix wide at 300 res

FAQs Natural Therapies: NOACs vs. Natural Blood Thinners Tests?

Complementary & Natural Therapies

Complementary & Natural Therapies

 FAQs Natural Therapies: NOACs vs Natural Blood Thinners?

“Have there been any tests comparing natural blood thinners to the new anticoagulants (NOACs) in terms of efficacy and speed of onset?”

Comparison testing is unlikely. It’s highly improbable that pharmaceutical companies and the FDA will one day pay for unbiased tests comparing their products to natural blood thinners. They have everything to lose and nothing to gain. Clinical trials are expensive, so it’s unlikely any others (e.g. the nutritional supplements industry) will have a financial incentive to pursue it either.

Return to FAQ Natural Therapies
Last updated: Saturday, February 16, 2019

Preventing A-Fib: Taurine & L-Arginine “Essential” Nutrients

Our body’s production of Taurine and L-Arginine decline with age. Considered “conditional” nutrients when we are young, as we age Taurine and L-Argenine may become “essential” nutrients to prevent morbidity and mortality. 

Cardiac arrhythmias like A-Fib with no known cause (Lone A-Fib) may actually result from deficiencies of Taurine and L-Argenine.

Researchers at George Eby Research Institute searched for nutrient deficiencies that could cause irregular heartbeats such as PACs and PVCs and atrial fibrillation. They found a wealth of literature supporting the amino acids taurine and arginine as common nutrients deficient in people with irregular heartbeats.

The researchers studied case histories of people with very frequent irregular heartbeats and found that adding 10-20g of Taurine/day reduced PACs by 50% and prevented all PVCs―but didn’t prevent pauses.

Adding 4-6g of L-Argenine immediately terminated the remaining pauses and PACs. Continuing this treatment maintained normal sinus rhythm.

The authors of this study hypothesized that cardiac arrhythmias like A-Fib with no known cause (Lone A-Fib) may actually result from deficiencies of Taurine and L-Argenine.

How Taurine Works

Graphic of Taurine 3D molecule

Taurine 3D molecule

Taurine is a sulfur-containing amino acid and is the most important and abundant amino acid in the heart. Taurine is found in large amounts in the brain, retina, heart, and blood cells called platelets. Taurine is found in eggs, fish, meat, and milk, but not in vegetable proteins.

Hypotheses of how Taurine reduces arrhythmias:

• Regulates potassium, calcium and sodium levels in blood and tissue
• Regulates the excitability of the myocardium
• Protects against free radical damage
• Dampens the activity of the sympathetic nervous system
• Dampens epinephrine release
• Restores energy and endurance

Graphic L-arginine 3D molecule

L-arginine 3D molecule

How L-Arginine Works

L-arginine (or Arginine) is one of the 20 most common natural amino acids. It is necessary for the body to make proteins. Foods that provide good amounts of L-arginine include carob, coconut, dairy products, gelatin, meat, oats, peanuts, soybeans, walnuts, wheat, and wheat germ. Chocolate craving may be a sign that arginine levels are low.

Hypotheses of how L-Argenine reduces arrhythmias:

• Works as a nitric oxide (NO) precursor which may have antiarrhythmic properties
• Restores sinus rhythm spontaneously
• NO stabilization of the sinus node thereby preventing cardiac arrhythmias

Don’t Try This at Home

Caution: The dosage of Taurine referenced in this study is a heavy dosage (10-20g of Taurine/day) requiring 10-20 pills a day. I think this dosage is too much and have heard that such a high level of Taurine can cause palpitations and high blood pressure. (But I’m still looking for studies that document this. Email me if you find related research.)

The Take-Away: As we age, our levels of Taurine and L-arginine naturally decline and at the same time become “essential nutrients” for maintaining good cardiovascular health. If you experience PACs and PVCs, try supplementing your intake of Taurine and L-arginine. To learn about the supplement Taurine, read my article ‘Natural’ Supplements for a Healthy Heart.

References for this article
Eby G, Halcomb WW. Elimination of cardiac arrhythmias using oral taurine with l-arginine with case histories: Hypothesis for nitric oxide stabilization of the sinus node. Med Hypotheses. 2006;67(5):1200-4. PMID: 16797868. Lasted accessed Aug 9, 2015. URL: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16797868

Minton, B L. Common Irregular Heartbeats are Completely Normalized by Taurine and Arginine. NaturalNews.com. June 04, 2009 Last accessed Aug 9, 2015 URL: http://www.naturalnews.com/026380_taurine_research_body.html

Taurine. Life Extension Vitamins. Last accessed Aug 9, 2015. URL: http://www.lifeextensionvitamins.com/cadico14thvz.html

NEW FAQ: Can I Take CoQ10 With a Blood Thinners

Minerals and Supplements w border 125B at 96 res“Can I take the supplement CoQ10 while on Eliquis for Atrial Fibrillation? On your site it says CoQ10 could be helpful. But on my bottle of CoQ10, it says “do not take if you are on blood thinners”.”

Eliquis is a “single key activated factor,” while warfarin affects many different steps in the anticoagulant process. Vitamin K foods aren’t restricted with Eliquis. That might indicate that you could take CoQ10 with Eliquis. But Eliquis is so new we have little research to definitively say this.

To read Steve’s full answer, see FAQs Minerals & Supplements, Question 12: CoQ10 & Blood Thinners.

Sources of Unbiased Research on Vitamins and Supplements

FAQ: “Where can I find reliable, unbiased research and information on specific vitamins and supplements? (I want an independent resource, not some site trying to sell me their products.)”

We agree that the most reliable information is from unbiased sites—often the best are non-commercial sites. We’ve looked at many, many informational directories. Three searchable databases rose to the top of our list. In order of preference, here are our favorites:

1. Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Institute/Integrative Medicine: ‘About Herbs, Botanicals & Other Products’
2. Drugs.com: ‘MedFacts Natural Products Professional database’
3. The ‘Dietary Supplement Label Database’ at the U.S. National Institutes of Health.

To read our complete FAQ answer with links to each database, go to FAQ Minerals Deficiencies: Reliable Research.

If you find other useful resources, send us an email and we’ll share them with our readers.

TWO VIDEOS About Magnesium Deficiency with Dr. Carolyn Dean

We’ve added two videos to our A-Fib Video Library featuring Dr. Carolyn Dean, author of The Magnesium Miracle, talking about magnesium deficiency and calcium overload:

See our library of videos about Atrial Fibrillation

See our library of videos

The Best Way to Supplement Magnesium” with Dr. Carolyn Dean. Getting nutrients through food is not always possible; discusses side effects of too much Mg and how you can tell if you have a deficiency.(3:39) Go to video. From iHealthTube.com.

Importance of Balancing Calcium & Magnesium”. Dr. Dean discusses the importance of balancing your intake of magnesium and calcium (2:1); the benefits of both and why you need to have both in the body; the problem of ‘calcium overload’. (2:30) Go to video. From iHealthTube.com.

FAQs Minerals & Supplements: Chelate – What does it mean?

FAQs Minerals & Supplements: Chelated

“What does ‘chelate’ or ‘chelated formulas’ mean when talking about vitamin and minerals? Is it important?”

“Chelated” minerals are among the mineral supplements touted for their improved absorption. The word, chelate (pronounced: key late) means to create a ring-like complex, or in loose terms ‘to grab and bond to’.

Most clelated formulas use protein molecules, i.e. chains of amino acids. The human body is very efficient at absorbing individual amino acids. (Amino acids are not the only “chelators” available, but they are ideal for minerals.)

For instance, the amino acid glycine is readily absorbed across the intestinal wall. When the glycine “grabs” and bonds with a Magnesium molecule, you’ve got Magnesium Glycinate. The idea is that the chelated Magnesium doesn’t break down in the digestive process. Instead it is easily absorbed, because it gets carried to your cells bound to the amino acid.

Don’t confuse with “Chelation Therapy”—treatment for removing heavy metals (including mercury) from the blood. 

Are Chelated Minerals Better for Absorption?

In the nutritional supplement industry, many claims are made for the superior absorption of certain, sometimes proprietary, mineral formulations. Drug stores and supermarkets, for example, sell chelated calcium and iron pills that are advertised to be absorbed better than cheaper non-chelated minerals.

[The foremost proponent of the superiority of true mineral amino acid chelates, is Albion Laboratories of Clearfield, Utah, which develops, patents, and markets these chelates as ingredients for dietary supplements and fortified foods.]

But according to a WebMD.com post, Find a Vitamin or Supplement: Chelated Minerals:

“Promoters sometimes market chelated minerals as dietary supplements that are superior to other mineral supplements, claiming chelated minerals are used more easily by the body (more bioavailable) than non-chelated minerals. But there is no evidence to support this claim. In fact, there is very little scientific information about chelated minerals.”

Sports medicine doctor and fitness guru, Dr. Gabe Mirkin agrees.

“You can get all the minerals that you need from a varied diet, but if you want to take extra minerals, Chelated minerals offer no advantage over non-chelated ones.”

In this post entitled, Chelated Minerals Not Better, Dr. Mirkin goes on to explain that once a non-chelated mineral is in your intestines, it naturally will chelate or bind to parts of food—in fact, to almost everything that you eat, such as organic acids like citric acid in fruits, sugars like those found in milk, and amino acids like those found in any protein source that you eat.

What’s in Your Stomach Determines Mineral Absorption

Mineral absorption depends on what is in your stomach and intestines when you eat the mineral. One mineral can affect the absorption of another (in a good way, or a bad way). For example:

•  Fat increases and fiber decreases mineral absorption.
•  Vitamin C will significantly increase the absorption of iron from plant foods.
•  Taking calcium with iron together reduces absorption of both minerals.
•  Taking large amounts of zinc markedly inhibits copper absorption.

Chelation or lack of chelation is insignificant compared to the variable conditions in your digestive system, according to Dr. Mirkin.

References for this Article
•Find a Vitamin or Supplement: Chelated Minerals. WebMD.com website. Last accessed Dec 10 2014. URL: http://www.webmd.com/vitamins-supplements/ingredientmono-41-chelated%20minerals.aspx?activeingredientid=41&activeingredientname=chelated%20minerals/

•Mirkin, G. Chelated Minerals Not Better. Dr. Gabe Mirkin on Health, Fitness and Nutrition. June 01, 2013/Checked Nov 2 2014; Last accessed Dec 10 2014. URL: http://drmirkin.com/nutrition/9354.html

Return to: FAQ Minerals & Supplements
Last updated: Monday, June 18, 2018

FAQs Minerals & Supplements: Can restoring Mg levels reverse my A-Fib?

 FAQs Minerals & Supplements: Can Mg Reverse A-Fib? 

Minerals & Supplements

Minerals & Supplements

Regarding Magnesium, can supplementing and restoring Mg to healthy levels reverse my A-Fib? I’m about to schedule a catheter ablation. But if supplementing can cure my A-Fib, why do an ablation? (BTW: I ordered, and love your book!)”

It would probably take you at least six months to build up your magnesium levels to normal or better. You have to start slow 100 mg/day, then gradually build up to 600 or 800. Too much magnesium too soon will give you loose stools and diarrhea and will make you lose electrolytes like magnesium and potassium. (In Europe magnesium is often used as an IV in the emergency room to get people out of an A-Fib attack. But this is rarely done in the US.)

Magnesium Isn’t As Successful As a Catheter Ablation

Unfortunately we can’t guarantee that achieving these normal levels of magnesium will cure your A-Fib once it’s established. We just don’t have enough scientific data to say that. But we do know that a successful catheter ablation can make you A-Fib free.

Of all the 70+ personal A-Fib stories we’ve published on A-Fib.com, we only have one who states she was cured by natural supplements. (She takes much more than just magnesium and started when she first developed A-Fib.)

Personally I take 800 mg/day of magnesium along with all the other supplements mentioned in my book, Beat Your A-Fib, as insurance for not getting A-Fib again. I was cured back in 1998 by a procedure that would be considered primitive today. A ‘focal point’ ablation was done on only one of my pulmonary veins. None of the others were isolated.

But if you have a successful catheter ablation and your PVs are well isolated, you are, in a sense, immunized against developing PV-originating A-Fib again. But A-Fib can develop in other parts of the heart, too, which is why we continue to take magnesium and other supplements to restore and maintain normal nutrition levels.

Magnesium To Make You Heart-Healthy

Getting your magnesium levels back up to normal will likely make you feel better and be more heart healthy. You might become one of the few who are completely “cured” of A-Fib just by taking natural supplements. But with your already established A-Fib, you can’t rely on that happening. Remember, A-Fib is a progressive disease. Waiting another six months while you build up your Mg levels is giving your A-Fib more time to “remodel” and damage your heart.

If you have been in A-Fib for a year or more, it’s probably better to go through with your scheduled ablation.

Magnesium For Six Months For Newly Developed A-Fib?

For people who just developed A-Fib, it may be worth trying natural remedies along with avoiding A-Fib triggers for six months or a year before going for a catheter ablation. But there is a caveat. The longer you stay in A-Fib while trying various natural remedies (or drug therapies), the more your heart changes and remodels itself. In particular, A-Fib produces fibrosis, a scarring and hardening of the heart walls, which is permanent and to date irreversible. (See my 2013 BAFS article, A-Fib Produces Fibrosis) If you don’t see a dramatic reduction in your A-Fib episode frequency, duration and overall burden within six months (or less), then head straight to the most experienced and skilled EP you can find for an ablation.

Combine Ablation With Heart Healthy Nutrients and Life-Style Changes

The trap for those who work hard at improving nutrition and supplements is they feel like a failure if they can’t stop their A-Fib with natural means alone. They keep trying one thing after another for years while avoiding the obvious need for an expert ablation procedure.

But trying natural remedies for A-Fib shouldn’t be an ‘either/or’ decision.

We should use every tool possible to put the ‘A-Fib genie back in the bottle’. The best approach is to combine an expert ablation procedure with permanent dietary improvements (including heart healthy nutrients and supplements) while also addressing any appropriate life-style changes (i.e., for high-blood pressure, sleep apnea, diabetes and obesity).

For someone who has just developed A-Fib, try to get out of A-Fib ASAP. It goes without saying that it’s not healthy and feels terrible to have A-Fib attacks.

Thanks to Daniel Towner for the excellent question and to Shannon Dickson for sharing his ideas.

Return to: FAQ Minerals & Supplements
Last updated: Monday, June 18, 2018

New FAQ: Can restoring Mg to healthy levels reverse my A-Fib?

 New FAQ: Mineral Deficiencies & Supplements Regarding Magnesium, can supplementing and restoring Mg to healthy levels reverse my A-Fib? I’m about to schedule a catheter ablation. But if supplementing can cure my A-Fib, why do an ablation?”  Read Steve’s answer.

80% of Americans are Deficient in Magnesium

First published 

Most US adults ingest only about 270 mg of magnesium a day, well below the modest magnesium RDAs of 420 mg for adult males and 320 mg for adult females. (The Recommended Daily Allowance, RDA, is the minimum amount for a healthy person; A-Fib patients are frequently extremely deficient.) This creates a substantial cumulative deficiency over months and years.

“At least 80% of Americans are deficient in magnesium.” Why? Magnesium used to be plentiful in fruits, vegetable and grains, but decades of industrial-scale farming have stripped the soil of minerals like magnesium.

One study found that the nutrient content of crops has declined by as much as 40% since the 1950s. “It’s now is almost impossible to get adequate amounts of magnesium from food.”

For more about Magnesium, go to our Mineral Deficiencies page. If considering a supplement, read: Low Serum Magnesium Linked with A-Fib, by Lynn Haye; and Natural’ Supplements for a Healthy Heart.

References for this Article
Goodman, Dennis. This Mineral Prevents Headaches, Heart Disease, More. Bottom Line Personal. Volume 35, Number 2, January 15, 2014.

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